VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze Diesel forum banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I just completed a camshaft/TB/Water pump/tentioner/roller on a 05 1.9 tdi bew mk4, turned engine 2 times by hand checked everything a zillion times...Went to start engine, engine turned over 2 or 3 times then the battery died go figure I was only able to turn key maybe 3 seconds before batter died. So I put the amps to it and charged it for the day. Engine wont even turn over now, I re checked and turned engine by hand another 2 times to make sure engine was not siezed up. I took alternator off, tested it-works great. There is no clicking or noise from alternator. No major corrosion anywhere I can see, any connections I have seen have been cleaned. One key fob kept tripping car alarm, using other key fob now (this proly dose not have anything to do with a no start?) Check engine light is on, i am getting code reader and seeing what codes it has. The dummy light for the change your breaks is on, one caliper is off at the moment, this I am assuming has nothing to do with a no start? I put in a new battery, still no turn over. Can it really be the ignition key? This is a standard as well. Thanks, Jason
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
187 Posts
If your timing is out then it doesn't seem to have damaged your valves / pistons. You didn't take off the crankshaft pulley / cog? (the one at the timing belt end) - if you didn't touch this, then put in your tool to align crankshaft to TDC, and refit your belt, making sure camshaft is in the right position. You might get away with just loosening the three bolts on the pulley / cog on the belt end of the camshaft and moving the pulley to get it better timed.
Did you touch the crankshaft position sensor? is it connected ok?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the tips, yes I did take off cog when I replaced belt, will verify timing. I did not not touch crankshaft sensor, it appears to be connected will test continuity soon. Have code P0118 engine coolant temp sensor circuit high input, would this prevent engine from turning over?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
187 Posts
take off the crankshaft pulley / cog? or rotate the crankshaft without the locking tool (although possible with it in) whilst the belt was off? If you didn't touch this cog or sensor and used a locking tool before you took off the belt then it is probably ok.
"P0118 engine coolant temp sensor circuit high input " check your wiring - maybe you dislodged something? My notes from KeithUK say:

Fault Location:
Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) Sensor (G62) - Signal too High

Possible Cause:
Malfunction Indicator Lamp (MIL)(K83) active.
Difficulties with starting a cold engine.
Starting the engine when engine is warmish or warm, idle rpm immediately is 1200 - 3000 rpm.
RPM at idle is irregular.
With all engine temperatures idle rpm will often vary between 900 - 1000 rpm.
With engine warm (90 °C) the engine temperature suddenly drops (70 °C) and slowly comes back to 90 °C.
Bad acceleration during warm-up.
Diesel Engines: Glow plug indicator may be on for a longer than normal time or at ambient temperatures where it shouldn't come on at all.

Low engine coolant level.
Coolant thermostat.
Wiring/Connector(s).
Engine coolant temperature (ECT) sensor (G62).

Possible Solutions:
Check/Replace all faulty Wiring/Connector(s).
Read Measuring Value Blocks (MVB).
Check/Replace Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor (G62).

Special Notes:
In many cars between MY 1995-2002 the G2/G62 had a bad reputation for failing often. The original G2/G62 sensor is black and the improved replacements are green.

When is the code detected?:
An excessively high voltage from the sensor is sent to Engine Control Module (ECM).

Description:
The Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) sensor is used to detect the engine coolant temperature. The sensor modifies a voltage signal from the Engine Control Module (ECM). The modified signal returns to the Engine Control Module (ECM) as the engine coolant temperature input. The sensor uses a thermistor which is sensitive to the change in temperature. The electrical resistance of the thermistor decreases as temperature increases.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
Top