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Okay so I was driving and sometimes I could smell diesel inside the cab thought nothing of it then one day it soubded like an exhaust leak then about 2 days later there was a ton of smoke coming from underneath my hood and after taking some hoses out of the way I saw this pipe is cracked. But I have no idea what it is called and how the easiest way to replace it is because there is no room anywhere
9034
9035
 

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That is the EGR pipe. If I remember correctly, it connects the egr cooler (exhaust side) to the egr valve (intake side). I can’t remember if there is one or two fasteners on the head, but it’s not an easy job. The air box, the intercooler pipe from the turbo, and the coolant flange on the side of the head all have to be moved to get to the bolts/nuts. It’s tight even with that out of the way. I may have even removed the battery as well. I did this about four years ago and replaced the gaskets, egr valve, and cleaned the charge pressure valve (throttle valve) out by hand when I did it. That part was revised, I believe, probably due to lack of durability. If I find the part number I’ll add it. 03G131521AT
 

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Yes, EGR Pipe. Bolts are hard to remove sometimes due to heat cycles. I suggest using copper anti-seizure when reinstalling so if ever needed to remove again it makes it super easy
 

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Yes, EGR Pipe. Bolts are hard to remove sometimes due to heat cycles. I suggest using copper anti-seizure when reinstalling so if ever needed to remove again it makes it super easy
This is one of those debated topics, so I risk causing more discussion on the anti seize. I highly recommend against using the anti seize here as it can run into the gasket face and the egr path. When I removed the part, also called an egr tube, a previous repair had anti seize on the bolts. This had in turn run onto the gasket face over time and made the fiber gasket brittle through heating and cooling events. When I pulled apart the old egr valve (intake side) it had anti seize coked with soot on the plunger. Also there was evidence of coked up spots on the butterfly valves in the intake. Maybe this case is the exception rather than the rule, but I just wouldn’t risk it. Also, the service manual does not suggest placing anti seize here. I checked this at the time of repair because of the evidence of anti seize that was there when I removed the egr pipe.
 

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It appears you may have over done the anti seize. I have been using it for years without any issue on gassers as well. A little goes a long way
 

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Again, I wasn’t the one using the anti seize. I just found the evidence. I also agree with “a little goes a long way”. I use a metal paint brush to apply it when I do and skim excess off with a shop rag.
 

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Yes sir. That is similar to what I do too. A couple of years ago a friend of mine came to me for having a misfire in his car. Seemed like the misfire was moving all across the 4 cylinders. It was a gassers. He said he recently had a "tune-up" done.

We pulled the spark plugs out and found excess anti-seize all over the threads going down on to the tip! Someone really liked anti-sieze :)
 
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