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Hello

I have a 2009 Jetta TDI Sportwagon (with DSG) I purchased new in April 2009. The car has been absolutely fantastic, and I have not had a single problem!! I average aroung 38 mpg for a 60/40 ratio of highway and city driving. The DSG transmission is great, in my opinion.

Now that my "free" maintenance period is over, I have been SHOCKED at the prices the dealership wants for routine work. The bigger problem is talking to a service advisor who actually knows anything about the diesel and/or DSG transmission. This scares me! I've talked to all of the dealers in my area and all have the same issues. They all want $900-1200+ for the 40K services mentioned below. Looks to me about $250 in parts and oil from IDPARTS.COM

My car is getting close to 40K miles so I have been looking at the various maintanence threads and have found them to be very informative and quite helpful. I used to do all my own oil changes and tune-ups in the "old days", but have been spooked with modern cars and their complex systems.

The 40K service calls for oil/filter change, fuel filter change, air and cabin filters, and DSG oil/filter change. Everything looks straightforward except for the DSG oil change. I don't have the VAGCOM tool or software and I'm not sure I want to spend the $300 or so just to get the DSG oil temperature (yes I know it can do more than that).

I read the "factory" and the "drain/refill" method that are posted elsewhere on this site.

My question is: Would it be an easy and valid way to change the DSG oil using an extractor? You could measure how much oil is extracted, then refill with the same amount (and maybe a little more to handle the new, dry filter).

If yes, you could do this at room temperature, measure the amount extracted and put back room temperature new oil. Am I missing something here that would contraindicate the use of an extractor?

Seems like a slam dunk if this is possible, other than the work needed to get to the filter.

Any comments or suggestions??

Again, this is the best site I have seen for the TDI. I especially like the idea of keeping the same generation car threads together, like my "5" vehicle. It's a pain to read a thousand threads and get concerned about some comments, only to find out later the person was talking about a much older version.

Thanks.
 

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I would not use an extractor because I don't know how far the tube will go into the DSG fluid pan. I used one to clean out the filter housing. You can certainly try it though. If you remove the drain plug and snorkel and nothing comes out, I can add this as a valid method to the FAQ article. http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/multi/dsg-diy-fluid-change-service.htm

Just make sure the car is as level as possible.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Appreciate the fast response. I will try it and see if all the oil is sucked out by the small diameter tube.

If succesful, will advise.
 

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Follow up to the proposed extractor option

Hi

Brand new owner of 2011 Golf TDI with DSG, beginning yesterday. This forum is great and I appreciate any knowledge or tips you guys can pass on. So planning ahead I had the same thought as diddocman regarding changing the DSG fluid . Digdocman how did your attempt to use the extractor for the DSG fluid change work? Did it access close to the desired target of 4.5 liters if it did not what proportion was accessed using the extractor tube- is it naive of me to suggest that if it can access 2 liters of DSG that one might be able to change 2 litres of DSG every 20k miles . Just a thought would appreciate your response

Kind regards

recmian
 

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Thanks Chitty-chitty-bang-bang! much appreciated. hopefully digdocman can relate his experience with the extractor.
Tried to locate diagrams to visualize the area below the oil filter, seems like the DSG fluid pump connects just below suggesting access beyond is blocked after a short distance and at best the suction tube would likely end at least a few inches from the bottom of the pan. This is all guess work on my part of course digdocmans experience would help clarify
The drain and replace volume procedure main weakness lies in the accuracy of measurements and removing fluid at more frequent intervals as I proposed will only increase the vulnerability but I think if you are careful and perhaps weigh the old filter on removal with the dry filter as a tare that may help but by the 4 or 5th change using this method I think there will be increasing probability of an under or over fill. I am curious to pursue this a bit more but my common sense tells me that unless I change at least 1/2 the volume in the case with the extractor I may be creating more risk than benefit. Also I wonder if you can "create" a dipstick to insert down where filter was before you drain the DSG the first time and record the level. In combination with careful measuring over time do you think that verifying with a "dip stick" checks as part of the procedure during the fill would decrease the varience overfill or under fill?

Sorry for such a long message

Thanks for your response

kind regards

m
 

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The drain tube is the dipstick. I don't think you can get the extractor tube to the pan but don't remember for sure. This is just how lots of german automatics are.
 

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dsg trans filter

Isn't the the transmission filter the screw on type? On my 2010 a3 tdi it appears to be, with the trans cooler above it?- If so why not just fill the new one up and then install when changing the trans fluid.
 

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Use Pela 650 extractor for 40k DSG change on '11 JSW TDI

Greetings:

I see this idea was mentioned but there was no follow-up; I'm about to tackle this project within the next week and was looking to see if anyone else has attempted this using an extractor. I plan to use the top-fill method (already made my big $$$ purchase from Blain's Farm & Fleet for the funnel) and purchased the filter/bottles of DSG fluid through ID Autoparts. I just did my oil change using my Pela 650 extractor and believe that the DSG change would (theoretically) be just as easy - I have an extra pickup tube to use with it so there wouldn't be a risk of cross-contamination from the used motor oil.

If anyone would care to comment, offer suggestions or just give a little reassurance it would be much appreciated! I WILL follow-up and let you know if I went through with it or chickened out and went with the bottom drain method.

Thank you for your attention to this matter. I look forward to your reply!
 

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40K DSG fluid change - top fill (no Pela extractor)

Greetings:

I just thought I'd follow up to my previous post; I didn't use my Pela extractor to do my DSG fluid change on my 2011 VW JSW TDI (other than to suck out some residual DSG fluid from the filter housing).

This is a very easy service that literally saved me hundreds of dollars. I had a co-worker, who is a mechanic, with me to offer some pointers but I did most of the labor myself. The top-fill method is extremely easy!!! I purchased my funnel from Blain's Farm & Fleet - same funnel as Wally World. It fit perfectly in the DSG fluid orifice when the filter is removed. The funnel is great since I could stop the flow for the final measurement of 600 ml of fluid on the graduated side (oz/ml) of the funnel. I filled up the kitchen sink with hot water and placed the 5 (1L) bottles in there to warm the fluid a few hours prior to conducting the service to ease with the refilling process.

While I had the air filter housing off, I changed my air filter and cleaned out the air filter housing box . . . very dirty for 40K! Most of my filters and fluids I purchased from ID Parts (507.0 oil I purchase from a VW dealership (Fowler VW) via Amazon - cheapest price found for Castrol SLX 507.0 oil - $107/12L)

The whole process was a couple of hours - it will definitely go much quicker the next time since I'll be familiar with where everything is and how it disassembles . . .

I find the JSW TDI a very user-friendly auto with the do-it-yourselfer in mind; everything (for the most part) is accessed from the top side! I change my own oil using the Pela extractor and also change my fuel filter with every oil change. It's extremely easy to do even though I don't have the VAG-COM. I simply fill the fuel filter canister with diesel fuel/additive (Opti-lube) and allow it to soak into the clean filter. I've never had an issue with the car not turning over.

I think this website is a phenomenal resource and I find myself frequenting it prior to tackling a new project. Kudos to all who contribute and maintain it!!!!
 

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I think this website is a phenomenal resource and I find myself frequenting it prior to tackling a new project. Kudos to all who contribute and maintain it!!!!
Thank you. :thumbsup

How do you feel about those naysayers who claim VWs need frequent maintenance, special tools, and are impossible/difficult to service?

I say they're right:D
 
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