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2003 Jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, replacing water pump and timing belt 03 Jetta 1.9 tdi 5speed.. I started this project several months ago, and an accident kept me from finishing until now.. long story shorter, a friend was going to complete this project for me as a surprise… yes, I’m surprised alright!! So I have a water pump installed, new tensioner, rollers, all with new bolts, everything hand tight for the moment.. but the engine is no longer at top dead center, I had purchased a generic kit that had a cam lock that was basically useless, I did have the pin in the injection pump which is still in place. My question is how to put the engine at tdc? Do I pull the pin on the injection pump, torque everything down put the belt on, roll engine to the marks on flywheel as before? I can’t afford to make mistakes at this point, and appreciate the help. Also, I won my beloved Jetta in a war with the ex, so she has been sitting a year.. so I’ll be starting with good fuel, new fuel filter, of course new oil and filter, vw coolant, new air pump gasket, new air filter.. any other suggestions would be welcomed. Thanks again
 

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It's the cam and or IP that can be out of time relative to the crank, but...

Although component settings can shift ever so slightly (belt tensioner and belt), it should never be enough to be an issue: at worst it'll result in a bit of difficulty getting the IP pin in, though it should still go in (think in terms of thousands of an inch- a slight bit of force). If there's any substantial shift then there's an issue with TB components or their install.

TB jobs on these engines isn't something one ought to do with anything other than the proper tools.

Sounds like your cam timing could be off. You need to get the right cam alignment tool (you can get one that doesn't require removal of the valve cover). This isn't a "close is good enough" job: you can end up bending/eating valves.
 

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2003 Jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks for the reply Uh Oh..
The pin was already inserted into the IP, and has not moved, so I’m assuming it’s position is still okay? All the TB components are ready to be torqued, as well as the water pump. And that’s where I’m at today.. getting the cam at tdc and crank where it needs to be. I take pride in caring for my vehicles, just didn’t plan on someone else “helping”. Just need help getting to the point of “reassembly is the opposite of removal”. Hey thanks again, and any and all help is appreciated
 

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It doesn't matter if the crank, cam and IP have been spun around and are out of time/alignment. New engine assemblies never self-assemble into alignment:D One just places everything into correct position (with belt untensioned, cam pulley loose and IP not locked), which is verified via locking pins and such. See cam caveat below. NORMAL TB replacement, that is IF there's been no broken TB Belt and or cam/valve or piston/rod damage and change, won't find any significant alignment issues/trouble- it's merely a standard TB replacement procedure.

Basic steps (verify with the written procedures as these are from the top of my head):
  • Timing belt tensioner un-tensioned.
  • Crank at TDC per flywheel. Is this an auto or is it a manual? The timing marks are different (manuals are confusion-free, autos aren't as straightforward)
  • IP locking pin IN (verify with an inspection mirror) and the three pulley bolts loose (best to make sure the bolts fall within about the mid point of the pulley's slots*).
  • Cam positioning tool inserted (not that that is not really a "locking" tool as should not be expected to hold the cam against torque [you can break the end of the cam]) and cam pulley bolt NOT torqued.
  • Adjust/pre-tension tensioner per instructions and then torque nut (nut should never be tight to start with else when torquing you can pop the tensioner's tab in the back <- I fight this all the time)
  • Double-check that the IP pulley bolts (3) are approximately in the middle of their slots (gives you the most adjustment range, ensures you can adjust timing).
  • Double-check that the crank is still at TDC.
  • Torque cam pulley bolt using appropriate tools (counter-hold tool absolutely necessary) WITH CAM LOCK TOOL REMOVED.
  • Torque IP pulley bolts and remove IP locking pin (remove pin first or last, I don't think it matters other than alter the stickiness of the pin a bit, one way or the other).
  • Rotate engine via crank bolt (clockwise) a couple of rotations (helps to have GPS removed; not a bad idea to remove IP fuel shutoff wire, but remember to reinstall before attempting to start!).
  • Set crank at TDC and then insert cam and IP tools and check things are still aligned (again, IP pin is sometimes a bit tight and a bit of force/twisting might be required- it really comes down to a mere couple of thousandths of an inch [in every case for me timing has ended up perfect per VCDS- no need for adjusting; point here is that if you do this all correctly it's amazingly accurate]).

* This ensures that you have ample room for timing adjustment. If you're stopped up against one end of the slots you might not be able to adjust running/operating timing if it ends up needing adjusting. If you encounter this you'd be best served to reset everything: loosen tensioner, loosen cam bolt and break pulley loose etc. etc..

Cam positioning caveat: I do not believe that you can get the cam 180 degrees out unless you've installed a new/replacement cam (or, as would happen in such work, removed the caps); you should otherwise not worry about this being an issue (forcing you to remove the valve cover to verify that both valves are closed on cyl #1)- the slot at the end of the cam will be close and only require minor rotation to get the alignment/lock tool inserted. And a caveat to this caveat: assumes you know the state of this engine; if someone else has messed around you can NOT assume anything- best to verify everything.
 

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2003 Jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Uhoh, the Jetta has a manual transmission and I’m familiar with aligning the marks on the flywheel to the mark on the housing.. and my father bought this car in 05 with 9000k miles on it in Arizona, I purchased it from him in 2019. He drove it here to Ohio about once a year.. I’ll never forget bringing it home after I purchased it, I 70 between Indianapolis and Columbus Ohio.. yes the Jetta will do all it’s registered for! Thanks again
 

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I always look to include enough information for others who might come along so that there's no missing pieces.

Good that you have a sound history on the car. I've had to "get there" the hard way: create my own history, which requires TB, complete suspension and brake jobs (and there's the general engine checks, which, fortunately, have never turned up any real issues with any ALH car I've had [five ALHs, used, and all engines have been great]).
 

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2003 Jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed
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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
It doesn't matter if the crank, cam and IP have been spun around and are out of time/alignment. New engine assemblies never self-assemble into alignment:D One just places everything into correct position (with belt untensioned, cam pulley loose and IP not locked), which is verified via locking pins and such. See cam caveat below. NORMAL TB replacement, that is IF there's been no broken TB Belt and or cam/valve or piston/rod damage and change, won't find any significant alignment issues/trouble- it's merely a standard TB replacement procedure.

Basic steps (verify with the written procedures as these are from the top of my head):
  • Timing belt tensioner un-tensioned.
  • Crank at TDC per flywheel. Is this an auto or is it a manual? The timing marks are different (manuals are confusion-free, autos aren't as straightforward)
  • IP locking pin IN (verify with an inspection mirror) and the three pulley bolts loose (best to make sure the bolts fall within about the mid point of the pulley's slots*).
  • Cam positioning tool inserted (not that that is not really a "locking" tool as should not be expected to hold the cam against torque [you can break the end of the cam]) and cam pulley bolt NOT torqued.
  • Adjust/pre-tension tensioner per instructions and then torque nut (nut should never be tight to start with else when torquing you can pop the tensioner's tab in the back <- I fight this all the time)
  • Double-check that the IP pulley bolts (3) are approximately in the middle of their slots (gives you the most adjustment range, ensures you can adjust timing).
  • Double-check that the crank is still at TDC.
  • Torque cam pulley bolt using appropriate tools (counter-hold tool absolutely necessary) WITH CAM LOCK TOOL REMOVED.
  • Torque IP pulley bolts and remove IP locking pin (remove pin first or last, I don't think it matters other than alter the stickiness of the pin a bit, one way or the other).
  • Rotate engine via crank bolt (clockwise) a couple of rotations (helps to have GPS removed; not a bad idea to remove IP fuel shutoff wire, but remember to reinstall before attempting to start!).
  • Set crank at TDC and then insert cam and IP tools and check things are still aligned (again, IP pin is sometimes a bit tight and a bit of force/twisting might be required- it really comes down to a mere couple of thousandths of an inch [in every case for me timing has ended up perfect per VCDS- no need for adjusting; point here is that if you do this all correctly it's amazingly accurate]).

* This ensures that you have ample room for timing adjustment. If you're stopped up against one end of the slots you might not be able to adjust running/operating timing if it ends up needing adjusting. If you encounter this you'd be best served to reset everything: loosen tensioner, loosen cam bolt and break pulley loose etc. etc..

Cam positioning caveat: I do not believe that you can get the cam 180 degrees out unless you've installed a new/replacement cam (or, as would happen in such work, removed the caps); you should otherwise not worry about this being an issue (forcing you to remove the valve cover to verify that both valves are closed on cyl #1)- the slot at the end of the cam will be close and only require minor rotation to get the alignment/lock tool inserted. And a caveat to this caveat: assumes you know the state of this engine; if someone else has messed around you can NOT assume anything- best to verify everything.
And I forgot to mention the water pump went out, I immediately shut it off and hasn’t been started since.. TB was intact. Thanks
 

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Daughter's wagon had the WP replaced by the previous owner. He told me he'd replaced everything: I couldn't get the paperwork because he "needed it for tax purposes." Car was cheap enough and I am significantly versed in various work/repairs so I wasn't bothered by the fact that that guy ended up to be just what I figured: a total liar. One of the TB rollers was really rusty and squeaky- surprise, NOT! If a person is in there there is zero reason to NOT do a complete TB job! As the general advice goes: if you're not sure of the TB replace it!

Another car I got (wife's first one) had had a TB done by a VW dealer and the paperwork shows that they did NOT replace the WP! That WP survived until the TB was changed on-schedule (by the mechanic I'd sold it to): I figure it had at least 120k miles on it, perhaps as much as 140k miles (depending on when the first TB job was done- factory spec for 2000 was 80k miles- I'd bought the car with 143k miles and sold with 220+k miles).
 

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2003 Jetta 1.9l tdi 5speed
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Daughter's wagon had the WP replaced by the previous owner. He told me he'd replaced everything: I couldn't get the paperwork because he "needed it for tax purposes." Car was cheap enough and I am significantly versed in various work/repairs so I wasn't bothered by the fact that that guy ended up to be just what I figured: a total liar. One of the TB rollers was really rusty and squeaky- surprise, NOT! If a person is in there there is zero reason to NOT do a complete TB job! As the general advice goes: if you're not sure of the TB replace it!

Another car I got (wife's first one) had had a TB done by a VW dealer and the paperwork shows that they did NOT replace the WP! That WP survived until the TB was changed on-schedule (by the mechanic I'd sold it to): I figure it had at least 120k miles on it, perhaps as much as 140k miles (depending on when the first TB job was done- factory spec for 2000 was 80k miles- I'd bought the car with 143k miles and sold with 220+k miles).
Ok
 
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