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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited by Moderator)
Hi, just read through the how-to articles and ready to have a go at replacing my Timing Belt. I see lots of recommended companies but I think these are in the USA... any of our British contingent able to point me towards the best value On-Line UK supplier... with the Bank Holiday here is could be days before I get delivery. E-Bay prices for a good quality start at £83 for the Timing Belt kit and £28 for the basic tools (camshaft locking tool, crankshaft locking tool and tensioner locking tool).

Suspecting I will end up changing the head anyway... this is turning into an expensive weekend.

1.9 TDi PD ASZ in a 2002 Audi A3 Sport.
 

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Well that engine has a <2002 hydraulic tensioner, 2002> mechanical tensioner

Audi A3 (97-03) 1,9D TDI PD 2001-03 Engine code: ASZ

Hydraulic tensioner
Camshaft locking tool - No.3359.
Crankshaft sprocket locking tool - No.T10050.
Tensioner locking tool - No.T10008.
Two-pin wrench - No.3387.
ASZ/ATD - 4 mm drill bit.
ANY - 7 mm drill bit.

Mechanical tensioner
Auxiliary drive belt tensioner locking pin - Audi No.T10060.
Camshaft locking tool - Audi No.3359.
Crankshaft sprocket locking tool - Audi No.T10050.
Tensioner pulley locking pin - Audi No.T10115.
Two-pin wrench - Audi No.3387/Matra V.159.

I'm sure if you Google the part numbers someone in the UK will have them, there are plenty on eBay?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hydrolic/mechanical

Sounds like mine was made right on the point of changeover... are they easy to tell apart by looking?

Oh well, as my timing belt is broken...I will start the strip down and see what I can see... looks like no one is working till Tuesday anyway so hopefully by then someone here might point me towards a great deal on the belt kit... or at least tell me the ones to avoid. I am seeing Gates, SKF, Dayco and QH on E-Bay.
 

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I tend to stick with gates for my belts, they have a good reputation and haven't let me down yet. My local parts store stopped stocking QH because they had to many complaints and I don't know the others but yeh gates for me all the way.:)
 

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There are no writeups for PD head removal for that engine, care to do a step by step pictorial writeup? You can use the PD camshaft removal article as a start.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Write up

No promises...I will check the old lady's camera and if the gods smile on us... we will see. If this job gets done by me it will be on a shoestring... saving money wherever I can. That is the kind of article I would like to read.

My best mate and partner in car crime (I guess some people call it DIY mechanics) just phoned to say the turbo has given out on his 2001 Ford Galaxy... yes you guessed it... 1.9 TDi PD. Damn it's a bad week for these motors in Bristol. Thank God he towed me home before the turbo gave out. Looks like I am going to have oily hands for a fortnight.
 

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Sounds like mine was made right on the point of changeover... are they easy to tell apart by looking?

Oh well, as my timing belt is broken...I will start the strip down and see what I can see... looks like no one is working till Tuesday anyway so hopefully by then someone here might point me towards a great deal on the belt kit... or at least tell me the ones to avoid. I am seeing Gates, SKF, Dayco and QH on E-Bay.
Yes, according to your other post, the TB is definitely gone. Make sure to also measure the piston protrusion to make sure you didn't bend any rods and just to double check what head gasket you need. They vary in thickness according to how far the piston sticks out.
 

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Unfortunately I won the prize, sorry to hear that.

I would also inspect PS pump for normal operation, I think that your PS pump caused your TB to break. If your pump pulley fell off, chances are that the PS pump suddenly came to a complete stop while the engine was spinning. That is why your ps pulley fell off. Crankshaft rotates TB and accessory belts, so imagine you engine was at 2000 rpm when seized ps pump suddenly tried to stop spinning crankshaft.

You never know maybe you got somehow lucky as I said try installing TB first then rotate engine by hand and listen for any unusual engine noises before you start removing head. Chances are small that your head is OK now but you never know.
 

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Update...it's not the Timing belt

OK, I have been striping the car, following your excellent tutorial... and to my surprise the crankshaft pulley bolt was loose, I undid it with my fingers... and after a lot of huffing and puffing...I slipped the belt off and the pulley fell off. Apart from some obvious wear...as the pulley has been turning on the end of the crankshaft...it looked OK...until I realized the inside has been turned from a D into a O. there is a crack into one of the threaded holes and I guess the rest followed.

This afternoon I lifted the cam cover....turned the cam with a socket on the end bolt...everything moving nicely...all the cam followers popping back up and I notice the cam seems to spring a little as the valves shut... which gives me hope. I know some engines are designed to 'fail-safe' if the belt snaps the cam comes to rest with the valves all shut...and this seems to be doing just that or close to it.

So now I desperately need a replacement Crankshaft timing belt pulley... an unusual part to need, no one will list it so its the breakers...unless anyone here has a spare I could buy. I guess they are all very similar 22 tooth part no. 038 105 263 F
 

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No TDI engine has any kind of fail safe. They're all interference engines and the momentum of the engine means that at least some valves have hit. The best way to inspect the engine is to first remove the camshaft and lifters. If you see any impressions or cracks you know right away that there was damage to the valves. The best way to inspect the engine is to remove the head and then remove the valve keepers and springs to inspect them. Each valve should move freely in and out. Since the valves go straight up and down, a compression test may not reveal damaged valves. In some cases, they look OK but the valve stem gets compressed and fails a few thousand miles later.
 

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Since the valves go straight up and down, a compression test may not reveal damaged valves.
What makes you say that Chitty? If the valves aren't seating then a compression test will show that.

I'm not sure on the TDI engine but the valves don't go up and down relative to the piston they are angled in the head therefore they bend easily. I did a job at work a few weeks ago were the students did a timing belt job on one of our engines a Rover 1.4 16 valve twin cam and they didn't time it correctly. When they tried to start it it locked up. They retimed it and it started up on two cylinders a compression test showed no compression on two cylinders.

I removed the head and four inlet valves were bent. Considering this isn't a customers engine and it isn't going back on the road I tapped the valves straight in a lathe and refaced them. I ground them in and rebuilt the head with a new head gasket that we had in stock. Now the valve timing isn't straight forward on this engine as you don't set the pistons on TDC they are 90 deg before. Anyway it now runs a treat and all the compressions are now even.
 

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Thanks KeithUK, I meant the 8v TDI engines, I haven't looked at the 16V engines and I don't know what head his A3 uses. At least in the 8V engines, the valves go straight up and down. If the valves take a knock they can damage the stems and lifters without causing a change in compression. It's happened more than once that the compression was fine but the valve broke off at the stem later and trashed the engine. Yes, if the valves are at an angle and they take a knocking they will cause a change in compression.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Testing the valves

Rather than taking off the cam and removing the followers and looking into the valve seats.... I think I will try a feeler gauge between the cam and followers first.... if the valves are not shutting properly (ie bent) they should have a bigger gap... in any case they should all match...two sets of four the same. It won't take long and if there is anything wrong, the head will be coming off anyway. I don't have a diesel compression tester... never taken heater plugs out... never worked on a diesel before. Nothing like starting at the deep end.
 
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