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Discussion Starter #1
Articles include links to parts vendors so you can quickly compare pricing and kit components and differences between what the service manual shows and what may be on your car. There is also a bolt access hole that isn't mentioned in the service manual. Water pump change is in a separate article to free up some space.

Included in part 2 is a youtube video showing tensioner action.

Part 1- removal : http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/a5/brm-VW-Jetta-TDI-timing-belt-replacement-1.htm

Part 2- installation:
http://www.myturbodiesel.com/forum/f21/2005-5-2006-vw-jetta-tdi-timing-belt-installation-3006/

Water pump change:http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q_how_to/a5/waterpumpBRM.htm
http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/a5/water-pump-VW-Jetta-TDI-2005-2006.htm

The BEW engine is similar, if you have a BEW engine, read this writeup and the ALH writeup and you'll be able to figure it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Not sure. What I do know is that the car I worked on was different from what the Bentley had. And the Bentley also left out some really helpful tips like the access hole for the motor mount bolt.
 

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Chitty how hard was it compared to the ALH TB? I have changed about 10 TB on the ALH, but I have never changed one on a BRM
 

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Much easier on the A5 body because of more room and the motor mount access hole.

The ALH timing belt has more tricky areas than most simple engines, which is why I think it gets screwed up a lot. For example, the position of the injection pump pin could be misplaced, adjusting the injection pump sprocket, making sure the camshaft sprocket is tight, etc. And the valve cover bolts often stripped or were hard to access which adds significant time. The horizontal motor mount bolts are hard to access.

The BRM timing belt uses an idiot proof crankshaft lock and the horizontal motor mount bolt has an access hole pictured in the writeup. The motor mount is also attached at different points which makes removal much easier. No need to remove the valve cover. This all speeds things up considerably. I take my time, clean the misc parts as they are removed, and take multiple pictures each step to make sure the pictures are focused and usable. If I had to do it again, I think 4 hours is realistic. I'm guessing that a guru with a car lift and power tools could do it in 2 hours.

And the timing belt itself is simpler. As long as the tools are used (and the pin goes all the way in, not halfway in) it's harder to mess up, which is good news for those who take the cars to the dealer, lol. The only tricky thing is getting the camshaft sprocket in the right spot. Like the ALH injection pump sprocket, the BRM camshaft sprocket uses ovaled holes so that it can be adjusted without moving the camshaft. If the belt is put on the way I did it, the holes can be put in the middle with ease. If the belt is put on ending with the water pump as the service manual suggests, be prepared for a fight. The oilhammer way works but I've found that removing the sprocket completely like the ALH method, kills two birds with one stone: getting the belt on with ease and positioning the sprocket within the ovaled holes.
 

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One really good pictorial!

Chittybb-
Thanks for those great pics! I sent you a pm w/ a few Q's...
I should have posted themn right here!
This I would imagine is a 2K+ job @ a stealership!

dan
 

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Discussion Starter #10
re:
dan0 said:
Hi- I just registered on the site. It looks alot like the tdi forum, !
Anyway, I have a question or three on the timing belt change for my 06 Jetta TDI.

Why do we need to crank the camshaft backward upon installation, and why are there slotted holes in the cam gear?
Where does the "rig pin" go into in the cam gear? Where does it seat?
I mean, if the cam gear clamp-dn bolts and holes are slotted, what (good) does the cam gear pin hold, then? Confuzed.

No, I do not have a manual -yet.
I'm gearing up tio do this job early...I have 56K miles
I believe that the camshaft being tightened backward is to take up any slack on the right side (as you're looking at it) and put it on the side of the tensioner so that the tensioner can properly tighten the belt.

The slotted holes are to let the sprocket rotate within the range of the holes. If you watch the videos this will be more clear - the sprockets rotate a little during tensioning.

The pin through the camshaft sprocket goes into a hole. There are pics on the writeup that detail it. here they are again.

This one has the sprocket removed for illustration. As you can see, the pin holds the hub underneath the sprocket steady. The hub is bolted to the camshaft. This holds the camshaft steady. The ovaled holes on the camshaft sprocket let it rotate a little without moving the camshaft, which must stay at TDC.


If you're only at 56k, there is no rush. The factory recommendation on the timing belt is 100k miles. You can check it at 70-80k for obvious wear. If you want to change it early, 85-90k miles is early enough.
 

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So...

If I have it understood:
-The cam sprocket has slots for belt adjustment only. I cannot get a grip on WHY we need this feature. :dunno
-The pin (I call it a rig pin as Im an aircraft guy);) holds the cam @ TDC. Must be this pin goes through the sprocket boss to a hole in the cyl head itself?
- Why is it not mentioned we need to place this eng @ TDC BEFORE we commence a belt change? Did I miss that step?

I assume we must buy/rent these special tools to install this belt..
and lastly, WHY must we hoist the engine durinig tensioning?
Lotsa questions, need to get a good grasp on this procedure.

Thanks
dan
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The crankshaft lock's arrow will only be correct and fit at TDC. I will add a note specifically saying this. done!

The pin does go through the sprocket boss into a hole in the cyl head. This holds the camshaft at TDC. The sprocket must have the slots so that the sprocket can rotate (with camshaft locked at TDC) to let the tensioner apply tension evenly across the belt. If you didn't use the pin the camshaft would move as you tighten the belt.

The engine must be supported because you remove the pass side engine mount. You must remove the mount to remove the stuff on the side of the engine.
 

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I assume we must buy/rent these special tools to install this belt..
and lastly, WHY must we hoist the engine durinig tensioning?
Lotsa questions, need to get a good grasp on this procedure.

Thanks
dan
The engines have always been like that - the motor mount comes off on all mk4 and mk5 TDI. IMHO, it would have been nice to not have this step since dealers have messed it up and caused engines to drop later on :eek
 

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Owner of a 2006 special edition TDI Jetta. Getting close to 100k miles and about to have to change the timing belt, water pump, etc.
 

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Much easier on the A5 body because of more room and the motor mount access hole.

If I had to do it again, I think 4 hours is realistic. I'm guessing that a guru with a car lift and power tools could do it in 2 hours.
I can do a BRM in my garage with a floor jack, hand tools, and jack stand with my longitudinal engine hanger in about 2.5 hours. these BRMs are fairly easy compared to an ALH.. but I can do those in usually less than 4 hours start to finish.

altho, pulling the valve cover and inspecting the cam on a PD before I start adds about a half an hour to the job since its harder to access the valve cover on the BRM than on the BEW, and the gasket doesn't stay captured like it does on the BEW.. I still do it on each one.
 

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I'm in the middle of replacing my timing belt and am having trouble getting the belt back on. Any suggestions? Should I start from the crank and work to the cam or vice versus, do I need two people to do this, or am I just missing something very obvious...?? Thanks for you help.

Nick
 

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Discussion Starter #17
The service manual doesn't say to remove the camshaft sprocket but I do and it goes on loose and easy. Make sure the belt isn't getting caught somewhere or twisted. Make sure you have the right belt and right parts. Read part 2 of the writeup and it should help :)
 

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I'm in the middle of replacing my timing belt and am having trouble getting the belt back on. Any suggestions? Should I start from the crank and work to the cam or vice versus, do I need two people to do this, or am I just missing something very obvious...?? Thanks for you help.

Nick
  • you need to put it on the crank first.
  • I then slide my 10mm deep 1/4 drive socket between the belt and the housing 0on the bottom to hold the belt against the crank.
  • make sure the belt then routes on the correct side of the lower roller
  • rotate the tensioner fully counter clockwise, pit triangle pin tool into the hole in tensioner.
  • then rotate the tensioner fully clockwise with the pin installed. tighten the nut to hold tensioner in this position
  • leave the 3 bolts loose on the cam pulley, but keep it almost centered in its travel
  • pull all of the slack out of the belt betweeen the crank and the cam pulley, then lay it into the teeth of the cam pulley.
  • with the tensioner pinned fully clockwise, and the cam pulley bolts loose, and the slack fully removed out of the crank to cam back side, the belt will slip nicely over the water pump. if it does not, you have some slack in the system between the cam & crank. try again.
  • once you get it slipped over the water pump, check the cam pulley bolts and lock pin to make sure that they are about in the center of their travel. if they are, you are golden and can continue to puti t all back together.
  • if the bolts/pin are against one side or the other, you have to slip the belt off the waterpump and readjust the cam pulley to be into the center. (usually only having to skip it one tooth to do so)
Best of luck.
 

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Chitty,

Just registered, this will be my first belt change, and I am looking forward to using your guide! Thanks for the clarity and pictures in the first half of the guide. I am sure the second half will be just as good.

Rodger
 
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