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They are now on the way! I'd like to test drive one :yum:

http://www.autobloggreen.com/2008/05/06/first-new-vw-jetta-tdis-now-in-transit-to-us-dealers/

For everyone who has been waiting anxiously for the new fifty state legal Volkswagen Jetta TDI to arrive at U.S. dealers, it appears things are inching a little closer. A reader the other day spotted a transporter filled with Jettas festooned with TDI signage headed northbound on a North Carolina freeway. Andrew called a local VW dealer who confirmed that these were actually among the first batch of TDIs that will be available for test drives at dealers around North America for the next couple of months before they go on sale later this summer. We first reported on VW's plans back in February at the Chicago Auto Show. From the initial batch of 1,000 cars, each dealer will get one car initially and more will arrive through the course of the summer. Volkswagen expects about half of the 15,000 Sportwagens for 2009 to be TDI powered with about 30-40 percent of the sedans. Keep your eyes open for the new Jetta TDI and if you can snap some photos put them up on Flickr or some other site and send us a link. In the meantime check out the driving impressions of the gas-powered Jetta SportWagen.
 

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Prepare to get gouged. I'd like to buy one but 1 - price has to be reasonable and 2 - first model years tend to have some bugs. This is an all new engine for Europe too.
 
J

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I think it will be worth it. No other new car can give you the space, economy, and range of the sportwagen. Is it sportwagen or sport wagon? Either way, I don't believe the sport part of it unless it has a GLI suspension. Here's another good article I found.

Economists are fond of saying, with Thomas Carlyle, that economics is "the dismal science." As with much that economists say, this statement is half true: It is dismal. Consider this: In the last year, the greenback has had its intaglio-printed butt kicked across the financial papers by the loonie; the American economy began desperately swirling around the bottom of the bowl; and a resurgent euro now towers over the dollar like the bully in a Charles Atlas ad. And there I am, discussing all of it with Egon Kochanke, the economic minister at the German Embassy, during dinner at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. Volkswagen of America has invited Kochanke to the dinner, which was held to celebrate the introduction of the new Jetta SportWagen. An odd choice of guest for auto journalists, but a relevant one: With the cost of selling European cars in America steadily climbing, it would have been easy for VW to pull the plug on the SportWagen, claiming it's not economically feasible. And that would be a shame, because the SportWagen is the best argument against the compact crossover I've yet seen.

And why shouldn't it be? Unlike crossovers, which claim to be "car based," the SportWagen is a real car. It has smaller and lighter wheels and tires than most crossovers, which means the Jetta doesn't clomp and crash over bumps, and its passenger-car rubber has no pretense of going off-road, so there are no knobbly tread blocks to introduce slop into the steering. Returning 21 miles per gallon city and 29 highway, the SportWagen's 2.5-liter five-cylinder delivers fuel economy that's on par with or better than everything but the hybrids. The wagon's hatch is light, not too high, and can be opened and closed without requiring pull straps or a mechanical ballet of whirring motors. But most importantly, the SportWagen has a car's low roll center and (relatively) low weight to give it nimble handling.

Although it is built off of the Jetta, the SportWagen is not just a sedan with a hatch grafted on. The vehicle is all new from the B-pillar back. The stamping of the rear doors is unique to the SportWagen, and the new roofline tapers down over two thin C-pillars before continuing out to wagon-specific rear quarter panels and taillamps. Even the rear headrests are different, sitting lower as to not block visibility out of the hatch.

In spite of the extra metal required to stamp out VW's newest breadbox, Volkswagen says the SportWagen is only 50 pounds heavier than its sedan counterparts. And since all the Jetta's extra junk is in its trunk, it actually helps balance out the car's typically nose-heavy front-drive, 60/40 weight distribution.

The upshot of the Jetta's weight is that the suspension — MacPherson struts up front and a fully independent, multi-link rear — can be sprung more firmly without worrying about turning the interior into a paint mixer. I carved up a few Virginia backroads in a midline SE model with a manual transmission, and the ride is sporty, but not jarring. The electro-mechanical steering is still muted in terms of overall feedback and slightly numb on center, but its weighting is bang-on and it's more precise than anything else in its admittedly tiny class.

Standard and midrange SportWagens come standard with a 2.5-liter aluminum inline five that's deployed across the rest of the VW lineup and makes 170 horsepower and 177 pound-feet of torque. Step up to the SEL model and the Jetta comes standard with the same 2.0-liter turbo four that's been lifted from the Jetta Wolfsburg and GLI. These engines have been powering Jettas and Rabbits and GTIs for years, and in this application they're no different.

The engine that's keeping its acolytes awake at night is the upcoming 2.0-liter clean TDI diesel, available a month after the Jetta's July launch. Producing 140 horsepower and 236 lb-ft of torque, and mated to either a six-speed manual or six-speed DSG transmission, the clean-diesel TDI has been given a green light by all fifty states. Designed as part of the BlueTec co-operative (but not using the name, since buyers associate it with Mercedes), the TDI controls its NOx output — the downfall of diesels — by using a NOx trap. The trap sequesters the nasty stuff, periodically burning it off while the engine is running. As a bonus, the ultra-refined combustion process that produces those low emissions also quells the marbles-in-a-colander aural assault for which old oil burners are known.

The SportWagen's interior is straight Jetta from the seats forward. Since the wagon isn't arriving on the scene until July, as a 2009 model, it will also be available with the running changes being applied to all '09 Volkswagens, including VW's new touch-screen navigation that comes with a backup camera and can play DVDs when the car's parked. Other than that, the gauges, instrument panel, seat fabric, and controls will be instantly recognizable to anyone who's had seat time in the sedan.

It's when you look up that things change for the drastic. The traditional single-frame sunroof has been replaced by the panorama roof, a 12.7-square-foot expanse of tinted, tempered glass that spans from the front seats clear across to the cargo hold. A split pane, similar to what Audi uses in its Q7 SUV, the front panel can be tilted up or motored up and out. Since the panel extends so far behind the rear seat, there's no way that anyone up front could operate a sunshade the window's full length. A power-operated, perforated vinyl shade is part of the package.

Popping open the rear hatch presents you with 32.8 cubic feet of carpeted cargo storage behind the seats — actually less room than the last-generation Jetta wagon thanks to the rake of the SportWagen's rear window. What space is available back there, though, is endlessly reconfigurable in enough ways to entertain even the most jaded organizational junkie. The rear load floor is articulated and can be reconfigured into divider walls to keep your goodies from flying about, and there's storage cubbies under the carpet to hide your roadside unmentionables. The rear seatbacks fold perfectly flat and, when they're so deployed, the Jetta opens up into a 66.9 cubic foot cavern. That makes the SportWagen able to swallow larger loads than either a Jeep Patriot (54.2 cu. ft.), Saturn Vue (56.4 cu. ft.), or Nissan Rogue (57.9 cu. ft.).

Manual-equipped base models are expected to start at $19,000 and the mid-line SE should check in at $21,400. The fully-loaded SEL model, which comes standard with the 2.0T, is projected to be a hefty $26,400. Volkswagen anticipated that turbulent global economies could result in them being hammered on exchange rates, and moved production of the Jetta wagon — and even the European Golf wagon — to its plant in Puebla, Mexico, where production costs can be controlled more closely.

VW doesn't expect the SportWagen to be a volume player. The prevailing, and rather disappointing, wisdom is that station wagons have stigmatized themselves right out of the market. Long considered the domain of perennially unhip demographics like thrifty parents and schoolteachers, the station wagon has atrophied from 15% of the new-car market at its 1957 peak to 2% — or 300,000 — of the nearly 17 million cars sold last year. With a handful of European and Japanese brands already lapping at that trough, VW believes that even the headiest year of SportWagen sales will reach only 14,000 units.

As sales of utility vehicles are slowing and economical cars are starting to pick up steam, one has to wonder if the demand for wagons will stay flatlined forever, if perhaps even $4 gasoline isn't a strong enough solvent to scrub the memories of Country Squires and Vista Cruisers from our collective consciousness.
http://www.motivemag.com/pub/feature/first_steer/Motive_First_Drive_2009_Volkswagen_Jetta_SportWagen.shtml


 

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I don't know how legit it would be, but if I could get one, put a "myturbodiesel.com" bumper sticker on it, and then call the depreciation a tax writeoff, then it would be a nice project :p
 

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no, but from what I hear, dealers will take deposits, projected price will be MSRP + 3-5,000 if you want to be first in line. :mad: no thank you! I will pay MSRP if I get one but my current car still has the new car scent. I'd only sell if the new car was a big leap over the old.
 
J

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Just shop around, never pay over MSRP. If you pay over MSRP, the dealer won't lower the price until they don't sell at the higher price.
 
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