VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze Diesel forum banner

1 - 20 of 22 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Need some advice - or opinions, or all the above.

My 2004 Jetta TDI (BEW) has 120K miles, and I know the timing belt should be changed. I've had a couple folks tell me to get the kit, plan a weeknd, and do it. Yesterday I dropped by the local VW dealer to pick up some gaskets, and the parts guy, who was a VW Mechanic a few years prior, said that the timing belt change was just shy of being worse than death and taxes. He said was extremely critical to get the setting right else the fuel pump would be messed up, and so on and so on.

I had ordered and do have the "kit" that includes the timing belt, tensoners, new water pump and all, but now I am starting to get cold feet. My VW experience includes taking out the tranny to install a new clutch, removing, cleaning, and replacing the EGR cooler, cleaning and reinstalling the intake manifold and all that goes with that. But I am not sure if there are special tools needed and how really difficult a job it is. Opinions and advice welcome !!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
...He said was extremely critical to get the setting right else the fuel pump would be messed up
You don't have the type of fuel pump to which he was referring in your car... And the big "danger" isn't the fuel pump... it's maintaining the synchronization between the camshaft and crankshaft so there's no interference between them...

You do need the lockdown tools... see www.metalnerd.com - also sold through a few of the other vendors such as dieselgeek

Also see http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/a4/vw-jetta-tdi-timing-belt-change-replacement-bew-engine.htm
http://pics.tdiclub.com/data/3419/BEW_timing_belt_procedure.pdf
http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=160306
http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=224304

It's not that hard, but just take your time and make sure you lock the engine down !!!!!!!!!!

All the best,

Yuri
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Mtegart..... You can do this. I completed the timing belt change on my 2004 NB (BEW engine) two weeks ago. If you follow the instructions in the how-to forum, in a couple of days you will be patting yourself on the back. This was my first timing belt change ever on anything. I had a few problems but the forum members were most helpful in giving advice and directions to help me get past the issues I encountered. You absolutely need the crank and cam lockdown tools. I was somewhat hesitant about doing the timing belt change myself due to the fact that a local shop led me to believe it could not be done by someone with no experience and if you did manage to do the job the timing would need to be checked by their computer and so forth and so on......Follow the directions step by step and you should be okay. Good luck, Don.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
5,942 Posts
I think something to keep in mind is the fact that at some point nobody apart from the designer knew how to change the timing belt and it's only after doing it yourself that you learn. As said just follow the instructions, that's how most people learn stuff and you will be pleased and get a certain satisfaction from it.:)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
...at some point nobody apart from the designer knew how to change the ______ (fill in the blank)...
We'd like to think so, but... there have been so many miscalculations over the years... often the people who actually get to work on these things can figure out a practical way to perform certain procedures...

(The image that always comes to mind goes back a long time... I believe that the V8 version of the Chevrolet Monza required the engine to be lifted out of the car in order to access the rear two spark plugs... these were the days before long-life spark plugs...)

(Please don't anybody ask "What's a spark plug?")

Yuri
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3 Posts
Yes, you can do it. Just allow plenty of time. Most of the time will (should) be spent thinking through and understanding what you are doing. Don't skip any of the steps such as rotating the crank twice by hand. Important to double check everything. When you are done, it will be better than many service outlets would do for you.

You can rent a set of proper tools if you search the various TDI forums. The Metalnerd tools make it easy.

Good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6 Posts
Need some advice - or opinions, or all the above.

My 2004 Jetta TDI (BEW) has 120K miles, and I know the timing belt should be changed. I've had a couple folks tell me to get the kit, plan a weeknd, and do it. Yesterday I dropped by the local VW dealer to pick up some gaskets, and the parts guy, who was a VW Mechanic a few years prior, said that the timing belt change was just shy of being worse than death and taxes. He said was extremely critical to get the setting right else the fuel pump would be messed up, and so on and so on.

I had ordered and do have the "kit" that includes the timing belt, tensoners, new water pump and all, but now I am starting to get cold feet. My VW experience includes taking out the tranny to install a new clutch, removing, cleaning, and replacing the EGR cooler, cleaning and reinstalling the intake manifold and all that goes with that. But I am not sure if there are special tools needed and how really difficult a job it is. Opinions and advice welcome !!
Hi
I would advice to let a prof do the job!!
my car was just done through our local dealer! i just had 110000 km on mine and decided to do it now because of where we live!
These are not changes that you can do by yourself!

You better trust your car to experts because if something happens to your car afterwards you have to blame yourself!


B'rgrds,



Gene
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
Hi
I would advice to let a prof do the job!!
my car was just done through our local dealer! i just had 110000 km on mine and decided to do it now because of where we live!
These are not changes that you can do by yourself!

You better trust your car to experts because if something happens to your car afterwards you have to blame yourself!


B'rgrds,



Gene
I respectfully disagree, it's not easy if you've never worked on a car before but if you have done all the basic maintenance and a little more, the instructions here are really easy to follow.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
It's very possible that the VW dealer in the Dutch Caribbean has excellent mechanics who don't take shortcuts and replace all the needed parts properly.

The experience of many - especially in North America - has been that often this job has been done in a less than satisfactory manner (to be kind), and anyone who has the aptitude, access to tools, and the ability to follow directions and pay attention to details is likely to do a better job - especially if it's his own car, as he really cares what happens to it.

All the best,

Yuri

PS: a "prof" simply means that someone gets paid for doing the work. Often he can do the job faster, but there's no guarantee that the work is done competently...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
I just ordered the timing belt kit and other parts ie thermostat, thermostat housing, and fuel filter from idparts. I have only 72,000 miles so it's a bit pre-mature to worry about changing timing belts. Due to the short summers in northern NY, I have to plan ahead any big repair work in the garage and driveway. I'll probably do this in July 2011 and change the motor oil and filter at that time. I don't know which harmonic balancer bolts are on my engine so I went ahead and ordered the bit set. The VW dealer wants about $1,300 to do everything I want done. The only thing I'm lacking is if I run into some coolant hoses that need replacement. Normally at 100,000, I would replace all my hoses but most parts on my engine including the timing belt look good. I could probably get away with 120,000 before replacing the belt and associated parts but why take the chance on a $5,000 engine. $500 in parts is a lot cheaper than $5,000. Good Luck with your engine.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
2,243 Posts
Normally at 100,000, I would replace all my hoses
I don't know how old your car is, but most VW's running the proper G12(+) coolant have the hoses last a very long time - as long as no Diesel gets sprayed on them...

All the best,

Your neighbor from half an hour North...

Yuri
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1 Posts
Any updates to your installation? I'm interested since it's time for my girl to get her 'belt replaced as well.

I will value your experience since I too have resolved to do this job myself, with only a little reservation, after I got the quotes from my dealer and an independent shop. Thanks, no. Besides the cost, all my experiences in automotive repair tell me that absolutely nobody cares for my vehicles to the same degree as I do, and there is no way for them to charge the prices necessary to do so. So, my pickyness costs me my time. And, I'm okay with that.

Thanks to everybody who shares information on this site. It is a very valuable resource for all DIYers, IMO.

-kap
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
16 Posts
Yes you can, I know cause I did it twice!!! Make sure you lube the water pump o-ring so that it glides into place. ( I didn't and it twisted and got pinched) I figured this out only once the motor was warmed up and prestone pressure built up- and presto twice a timming belt job.

Other than that - follow the how to's and you'll have the satisfaction of working on your car!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
I did the timing belt on my Audi a4 2004 1.9tdi pd 130bhp engine. Was the first diesel engine I'd done. Previously I'd done my s3 1.8t.

I had the correct locking tools and it was pretty straight forward using Audi workshop guide.

To be honest the hardest part was getting the bloody front bumper/fender into the service position.

But I felt a great sense of pride and was £400 better off.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Newby

I am about to embark on a timing belt replacement and appreciate the remarks on the forum. I was going to go ahead without the specialty tools, but now believe that I should get them. What kind of cash and I looking at to purchase these tools.
 
1 - 20 of 22 Posts
Top