VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze Diesel forum banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
from edmunds http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/News/articleId=131506
CHERRY HILL, New Jersey — Subaru of America released details on the European-market 2009 Subaru Forester 2.0D today. It will get the 2.0-liter horizontally opposed diesel four-cylinder already offered in the Euro-spec Subaru Legacy, along with a new six-speed manual transmission.

Guaranteed to be the volume-selling Forester in Europe, the 2.0D has a 2.0-liter turbocharged diesel-4 rated at 145 horsepower at 3,600 rpm and 258 pound-feet of torque from 1,800-2,400 rpm. As in the Legacy, this engine uses an aluminum block — uncommon among diesels, which typically employ an iron block to withstand the vibration of their inherently tall compression ratios.

That horsepower figure might not impress given that the U.S.-market Subaru Forester gets 170 hp out of its normally-aspirated 2.5-liter gasoline boxer-4 and 224 hp from the turbocharged 2.5-liter in the Forester 2.5XT. However, the boxer diesel has significantly more torque than its gasoline counterparts. Even the 2.5XT offers just 226 lb-ft. Subaru says the diesel 2009 Subaru Forester has a 4,400-pound tow capacity.

Just as significant is the introduction of a new six-speed manual transmission. Its gear ratios are much closer together than those of the five-speed manual Subaru offers on U.S.- and European-market Foresters, making it much better suited for a diesel engine's narrow power band. In addition, a tall 0.557/1 6th gear should promote better fuel economy during highway travel.

On the emissions front, the 2009 Subaru Forester 2.0D gets a closed-type particulate filter in lieu of the open-type filter in the diesel Legacy. Subaru says this type of filter can treat higher volumes of particulate matter, which would make it better suited for the heavier Forester. The filter is packaged with the turbocharger at the lower part of the engine.

What this means to you: Still no firm date on when Subaru will risk selling its boxer diesel to us Americans, but the chunky Forester is probably our best hope. — Erin Riches, Inside Line Senior Editor
Sounds great, I wonder if the boxer configuration will smooth out the engine
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
23,902 Posts
It probably helps but the biggest smoothness improvement will be the common rail engine. Making many small injections is smoother than making one or two big injections because it smooths out the pressure waves of combustion.

Also, I think the Mercedes v6 common rail engine is aluminum.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
137 Posts
Now this would be good, VW won't bring a 4motion TDI to the US, a subaru is the same price range, similar power to the new TDI, and MANUAL.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
371 Posts
2nd, Subies are already aligned with VW buyers. You don't have guys cross shopping Ford mustangs with Foresters.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
175 Posts
3rd, Subaru has always been a niche player, this would definitely have a lot of buyers. They won't be Toyota but it'll sell well.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Lol, didn't even think of power mods. Is anyone at Subaru listening? STI diesel ? How about the longest name for any passenger diesel ? Impreza WRX STI Bluemotion TDI?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
96 Posts
Whoops, looks like it's a casualty of the economic crunch. May not happened and if it does, it'll be delayed.

http://www.autobloggreen.com/2008/12/25/subaru-indefinitely-delays-diesel-impreza-launch-in-u-k/

The Japanese yen is currently causing lots of problems for Japanese automakers. When the yen is weak, profits go up for Japanese companies that make most of their money by exporting vehicles to other countries. Conversely, when the yen is strong - as it is right now, having hit its highest valuation in 13 years - profits diminish. Subaru is just one of the automakers that's finding it tough to make a buck (or a yen) these days, and it has responded by indefinitely delaying the launch of its oil-burning engine option in the Impreza for the UK market. This news likely comes as a major blow to European dealers, considering that diesel engines handily outsell their gasoline siblings when they do manage to go head-to-head. Still, it's just as well that it'll be delayed as it would be priced out of the market if launched on schedule. Japanese officials have already called on the government to intervene by lowering the value of the yen, and if that happens, Europeans will finally get their diesel Subarus.
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top