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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My sons 2001 Golf TDI had a partial runaway the other night. We towed it home and I'm in the process of diagnosing. First I noticed the oil was down slightly as we just changed the oil recently. I would say it was down 1/5 from the top mark on the dipstick. I pulled the intercooler and drained about almost a cup of oil. I am now pulling the glow plugs to do a compression test and noticed the the glow plug on #3 was different from the others. Would anyone have any feedback on why #3 looks like that?

My next step was to see if any oil shoots out of noticeable quantity in case there was a hydrolock that occurred or could occur. Does anybody have a good link to an article or video doing that? Do i just disconnect power from the fuel injectors and turn the key over?

Next question on a compression test. Anyone have compression values for a 200K engine?

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
My sons 2001 Golf TDI had a partial runaway the other night. We towed it home and I'm in the process of diagnosing. First I noticed the oil was down slightly as we just changed the oil recently. I would say it was down 1/5 from the top mark on the dipstick. I pulled the intercooler and drained about almost a cup of oil. I am now pulling the glow plugs to do a compression test and noticed the the glow plug on #3 was different from the others. Would anyone have any feedback on why #3 looks like that?

My next step was to see if any oil shoots out of noticeable quantity in case there was a hydrolock that occurred or could occur. Does anybody have a good link to an article or video doing that? Do i just disconnect power from the fuel injectors and turn the key over?

Next question on a compression test. Anyone have compression values for a 200K engine?

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Follow up. Finished compression test. #1- #4, 340, 340, 120, 300

Dangit.

Per the Bentley:
New: 363-450 PSI
Wear Limit: 276 PSI
Max difference b/t cylinders: 73 PSI
So there's something going on with #3. Try doing a leak-down test.
When you get it set up listen to where the air is escaping (oil pan, intake manifold, tail pipe). That will help narrow down if it's valves or rings. This guy has a great video on leak down testing that I can't find ATM: https://youtube.com/user/CoolAirVw
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Per the Bentley:
New: 363-450 PSI
Wear Limit: 276 PSI
Max difference b/t cylinders: 73 PSI
So there's something going on with #3. Try doing a leak-down test.
When you get it set up listen to where the air is escaping (oil pan, intake manifold, tail pipe). That will help narrow down if it's valves or rings. This guy has a great video on leak down testing that I can't find ATM: https://youtube.com/user/CoolAirVw

David, Thanks for the feed back. Weather is finally getting bearable to be outside so hoping to get a leak-down test performed this week.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I finally pulled the head off. My plan next was to pull the oil pan and push the #3 piston out for further inspection. There is some slight abrasion at the top of the piston on #3 (20220226_190500.jpg).

Has anyone seen something similar to this and maybe have thoughts on what they ended up having to do?
 

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Make sure you note the number of holes in the head gasket and measure the piston protrusion before you take the piston(s) out. It looks like #3's cylinder is scored. I'm betting once you get the piston out you see the rings are shot. You should probably go ahead and take all of he pistons out and measure the bores. If they are egg-shaped you should take it to a machine shop and have it checked / bored. This will mean new pistons / rings. If you see the bores are within tolerance after you measure them, you could probably hone the cylinders and put new rings, crank bearings, and rod bearings and motor on. You should buy the Bentely Service Manual ( https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0044A5ZK2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apan_glt_i_MSXPPPSPPK5FEBJ8VGXM) for details specs. These engines are super easy to work on and it looks / sounds like you willing to dive in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I got the #3 piston pulled and it's toast. Top ring is seized in place and slight scoring in the bore. Head was sent off for cleaning and new valves on the #3. I'm kind of hoping I can just hone the #3 cylinder, get a new piston and rings and slap her back together. BTW -Head gasket was a two hole and double check the piston protrusion and it looked to be within spec. Machine shop said he just took enough off for cleaning only. I ordered the Bentley books and will read through those and double check the protrusion again. Having said that after ordering new turbo, new exhaust, head studs, glo plugs, etc. and spending all this money I want to make sure I am doing it right and don't want to be back under the hood in 2 weeks after completing. My issue is I don't really want to pull the engine, but wonder if I should to make sure the pistons, crank, and specs are all good.

Questions
-Can I get away with just the one new piston, or do I need to order all new pistons, rings and bearing.
-Do I need to pull the engine block and have it checked out and bored out.
-Any recommendation on a gasket kit?
-How to check if water pump is good or should I just replace. No idea when or if it was ever changed.

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Since you're dealing with a partial runaway, I would go ahead and pull the engine and take it to the machine shop. You're at a point in your tear-down where it won't take much more to get the engine and transfer it. Just follow the Bentley. I've pulled both my '01 and '02 and can offer advice, but you have everything under control.

Make sure your machinest knows how to work these blocks. There are a lot of machinists that will deck the block parallel with the oil pan rails... that is incorrect. The deck must be decked so it is parallel with the bearing cap lands (the surface the main caps bolt into). VW did not make the pan rails exactly parallel with the land and thus the deck.

Check out this guy's YT video where he goes through checking protrusions after he got his block back from the machine shop:
He has videos that show his whole start-to-finish journey rebuilding an ALH. I learned a lot about ALHs from his videos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Since you're dealing with a partial runaway, I would go ahead and pull the engine and take it to the machine shop. You're at a point in your tear-down where it won't take much more to get the engine and transfer it. Just follow the Bentley. I've pulled both my '01 and '02 and can offer advice, but you have everything under control.

Make sure your machinest knows how to work these blocks. There are a lot of machinists that will deck the block parallel with the oil pan rails... that is incorrect. The deck must be decked so it is parallel with the bearing cap lands (the surface the main caps bolt into). VW did not make the pan rails exactly parallel with the land and thus the deck.

Check out this guy's YT video where he goes through checking protrusions after he got his block back from the machine shop:
He has videos that show his whole start-to-finish journey rebuilding an ALH. I learned a lot about ALHs from his videos.
David, Thanks for the input again. Yah, I've watched that kid. He's got some skills and also has the ability to share it with all of us. Great resource.

I'm getting most of the engine apart, but what's the cheapest, best tool for removing the crank shaft bolt? I've seen a few tools that guys fabricated (not an option for me) and ones you can buy for like $200 plus bucks. I saw this crankshaft lock as well just not sure it would work. I've got an impact wrench if that would help loosen it. Thanks again.
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Awesome work! You must have experience working on cars. Most people don't even attempt what you have accomplished!
I am not familiar with the tool in your first image, but I believe that tool is to hold the flywheel while it is torqued to the crank. I purchased this tool to hold the crank for torquing the flywheel / pressure plate: Flywheel Lock Tool
I bought a counter hold tool to loosen the crank bolt (Bentley calls this sprocket "crankshaft timing belt sproket). It is indispensable: Crankshaft Counter-Hold Tool (TDI) (you can probably find a similar tool from another vendor, I have had good experience with IDParts. com).
I know it seems like a lot of money, but during reassembly you will need to torque a new crank bolt (always replace), it will be a godsend. I bought an engine from Vermont where everything was rusted on the outside (including the crank sprocket). I used the linked tool propped up on a cinder block to counter hold (I had to take the engine off the stand and put it on the floor) and a breaker bar with a 5' cheater to get the bolt loosened; it held up perfectly. If you are like me you'll get the ALH bug and buy another VW with an ALH and you'll need it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Awesome work! You must have experience working on cars. Most people don't even attempt what you have accomplished!
I am not familiar with the tool in your first image, but I believe that tool is to hold the flywheel while it is torqued to the crank. I purchased this tool to hold the crank for torquing the flywheel / pressure plate: Flywheel Lock Tool
I bought a counter hold tool to loosen the crank bolt (Bentley calls this sprocket "crankshaft timing belt sproket). It is indispensable: Crankshaft Counter-Hold Tool (TDI) (you can probably find a similar tool from another vendor, I have had good experience with IDParts. com).
I know it seems like a lot of money, but during reassembly you will need to torque a new crank bolt (always replace), it will be a godsend. I bought an engine from Vermont where everything was rusted on the outside (including the crank sprocket). I used the linked tool propped up on a cinder block to counter hold (I had to take the engine off the stand and put it on the floor) and a breaker bar with a 5' cheater to get the bolt loosened; it held up perfectly. If you are like me you'll get the ALH bug and buy another VW with an ALH and you'll need it.
No, not much experience besides changing belts, starters and misc. over the years. This is a big step, but I thought it would be a good project with my son to teach him it's okay to get your hands dirty and maybe it will help him appreciate his vehicle after all the time we put into it (doubtful :-\)

I ended up going with this crank tool from ID parts. Hopefully she works. Crank Tool

I do think this little diesel engine makes a lot of sense. I think putting one in an old International Scout or FJ40 would be kinda cool. Maybe some day.

Thanks again for your help.
 

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No, not much experience besides changing belts, starters and misc. over the years. This is a big step, but I thought it would be a good project with my son to teach him it's okay to get your hands dirty and maybe it will help him appreciate his vehicle after all the time we put into it (doubtful :-\)

I ended up going with this crank tool from ID parts. Hopefully she works. Crank Tool

I do think this little diesel engine makes a lot of sense. I think putting one in an old International Scout or FJ40 would be kinda cool. Maybe some day.

Thanks again for your help.
He may not appreciate it now, I bet he'll remeber this experience later in his life.

I saw that tool
No, not much experience besides changing belts, starters and misc. over the years. This is a big step, but I thought it would be a good project with my son to teach him it's okay to get your hands dirty and maybe it will help him appreciate his vehicle after all the time we put into it (doubtful :-\)

I ended up going with this crank tool from ID parts. Hopefully she works. Crank Tool

I do think this little diesel engine makes a lot of sense. I think putting one in an old International Scout or FJ40 would be kinda cool. Maybe some day.

Thanks again for your help.
He will hopefully remember this experience later in life. This engine / platform is so straightforward to work on. Maybe he'll kee his Golf running for years.

I've seen that tool from Metalnerd. I don't have any experience with it. He makes great toold for the older VWs.

The ALH is an engineering masterpiece. I am constantly amazed every time I tear into one. The compression ration (19:1) is the higest of any mass-produced diesel engine in the US (including Ford, Dodge, Cat, Deroit, etc.).

That would be a great project. Please keep us posted on your progress. It'll be fun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
So we've got the block apart and measuring the tolerances. I think based on the book everything is within tolerances. Looking at the #3 cylinder walls do you think we can get away with a hone? While I was considering boring them all out and new pistons I found out we lost our only machinist in town so I would need to travel out of town to get the work done. Secondly, the added costs of all new pistons and machinist work would add considerably to the project. I'm not against it if that is is what needs to be done, but if it's no necessary I would rather save the money. Note we are adding a slightly larger than stock turbo, and slightly larger nozzles. Why not?!? :)

Measuring the tolerances -I took the standard dimensions for the bore of 79.51 (3.1303) from the book and set my micrometer to that, double checked with a telescoping gauge and then zeroed out my bore gauge. All were within .001 or less except #3 that showed .002 on one measurement and -.0005 on another. I took three separate measurements Parallel to other cylinders (A), Perpendicular (B), and at a 45 degree angle (C). Cylinder wear max is 0.10mm (.0039in) as well as Top, Middle and Bottom (bottom being the bottom of piston wear mark and not bottom of cylinder). Hoping I did that correct.

I'm now measuring the pistons and so far they also look within spec noting that some graphite coating has partially wore off. #3 is trash however, so would need to replace with same Mahle pistons.

Pic below -The first three are #3 cylinder, and the 4th is pretty much what the rest of the cylinders look like.

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That's a tough call. The grooves in No. 3 cylinder appear to have gone through the crosshatching (based on what I can be from your photos). I don't have experience with grooves in a cylinder wall like you have and their long term effect.
My $.0.02: you're going to spend $$$ on a turbo, bearings, timing belt kit, clutch, etc. I would look here
Car-Part.com--Used Auto Parts Market and see if you can find a block (engine) near you that is in better shape. You can put the one you have on the back burner for a later project build (now to 0.5 mm over, bigger injectors, stage 5 mod etc.) I found a good used long block with turbo and injection pump for $1900 using that site. It seems like a lot, but I cleaned it to and have been using it as my daily since last July.
You're going to spend a lot just getting what you have running. Those grooves in 3 might cause problems.
 

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A quick chime in here.... Nice job to both of you on that teardown! Great father-son times. And good help by David. I may have miss the results from the piston protrusion check, but how did that turn out? With the ring damage it suffered that probably saved a bent rod, which usually happens with hydrolock. I'm with David on the cylinder scratches. But you could give a drill chuck flat tri-hone a go (it would be great experience for your son) to help see if the scratches might clean up by a machine shop hone within limits. Powerbuilt Tools 648439 Powerbuilt Adjustable Cylinder Hone Deglazers | Summit Racing This sort of reamer will not remove enough material to get rid of ridges or scored areas but it may help give you an idea of the general condition. Home honing is generally done only when you are trying to break a glaze on the wall and just need to freshen up the bore a bit for new rings. Cylinder 3 does look to need at least a professional hone.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
That's a tough call. The grooves in No. 3 cylinder appear to have gone through the crosshatching (based on what I can be from your photos). I don't have experience with grooves in a cylinder wall like you have and their long term effect.
My $.0.02: you're going to spend $$$ on a turbo, bearings, timing belt kit, clutch, etc. I would look here
Car-Part.com--Used Auto Parts Market and see if you can find a block (engine) near you that is in better shape. You can put the one you have on the back burner for a later project build (now to 0.5 mm over, bigger injectors, stage 5 mod etc.) I found a good used long block with turbo and injection pump for $1900 using that site. It seems like a lot, but I cleaned it to and have been using it as my daily since last July.
You're going to spend a lot just getting what you have running. Those grooves in 3 might cause problems.
Darn I was hoping you wouldn't say that. I'll do some searching on that site and others to see what I can find out there. Thanks for input.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
A quick chime in here.... Nice job to both of you on that teardown! Great father-son times. And good help by David. I may have miss the results from the piston protrusion check, but how did that turn out? With the ring damage it suffered that probably saved a bent rod, which usually happens with hydrolock. I'm with David on the cylinder scratches. But you could give a drill chuck flat tri-hone a go (it would be great experience for your son) to help see if the scratches might clean up by a machine shop hone within limits. Powerbuilt Tools 648439 Powerbuilt Adjustable Cylinder Hone Deglazers | Summit Racing This sort of reamer will not remove enough material to get rid of ridges or scored areas but it may help give you an idea of the general condition. Home honing is generally done only when you are trying to break a glaze on the wall and just need to freshen up the bore a bit for new rings. Cylinder 3 does look to need at least a professional hone.
Moonshot, thanks for the input on the honing versus boring differences. As for the piston protrusion I didn't have dial indicator so I used the old feeler gauge and fingertip which I saw somewhere online as a means to check. I don't have the number in front of me, but it fell within the two hole gasket setting and all pistons measured similar. I'm not 100% sure, but I assume this is to check for bent rods mostly as well as the correct head gasket size.?.
 

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Moonshot, thanks for the input on the honing versus boring differences. As for the piston protrusion I didn't have dial indicator so I used the old feeler gauge and fingertip which I saw somewhere online as a means to check. I don't have the number in front of me, but it fell within the two hole gasket setting and all pistons measured similar. I'm not 100% sure, but I assume this is to check for bent rods mostly as well as the correct head gasket size.?.
You're correct on both, gasket and rods. It's important to be super sure a rod didn't bend during the mishap. You might be able to put a straight edge across the piston then slide something between the straight edge and block deck to measure with a set of digital or vernier calipers. and comparing each piston.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
You're correct on both, gasket and rods. It's important to be super sure a rod didn't bend during the mishap. You might be able to put a straight edge across the piston then slide something between the straight edge and block deck to measure with a set of digital or vernier calipers. and comparing each piston.
Block has been sent off. Will probably be a couple weeks before I see it again. Most likely the machinist will bore and oversize with new pistons. He'll check all the measurements including the rods.
 
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