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The 2011 Volkswagen Jetta that we get in the United States is a different animal than the one enjoyed throughout Europe. European Jettas are fitted with a multi-link rear suspension setup, upgraded wiring harness to handle more complex optional features and more upscale interior materials. Why don't we get these things? The main answer is cost.

A base Jetta in Germany would cost about $24,000 in the United States, and that is before any taxes are added. That base Jetta also features a less powerful 105-horsepower engine. That is a hefty leap over the North American Jetta's base of $15,995. However, if the new VW Jetta sells well in the States, there is a chance we could start to see some features that the European customers enjoy.

Strong sales would show that the Jetta is in high demand, meaning Volkswagen could realistically introduce the upgraded European features by way of a mid-model change, perhaps by 2014. Will it happen? Somehow, we tend to doubt it... but a lot can happen in three years.

[Source: Inside Line]Rumormill: European Volkswagen Jetta could come to the U.S. in 2014 originally appeared on Autoblog on Thu, 27 Jan 2011http://www.autoblog.com/2011/01/27/rumormill-european-volkswagen-jetta-could-come-to-the-u-s-in-2/
 

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While the autoblog article is pretty baseless you have to read the source to get any back up for these statements.

insideline said:
Inside Line promptly grilled Jetta Global Technical Project Leader Frank Donath. First question was flat-out: Will there ever come the day when Volkswagen brings the real deal near-premium Jetta and Passat to North America at a competitive price?
And Donath shot back, "There is the strong chance that the midlife Jetta for North America could get all of the European features. It depends on sales performance."All European Jettas get the multilink rear axle, while only the next GLI trim Jetta will get the multilink rear axle in North America," says Donath.
Another truth is that all U.S. Jettas (again, apart from the imminent GLI) use the simpler PQ25 wiring harness of the VW Polo subcompact, while all European Jettas get the more sophisticated PQ36 harness. "This was decided," explains Donath, "since the North American cars have fewer complex options available." For just one instance, two-zone automatic Climatronic climate control offered in Europe is not offered on U.S. Jettas or Golfs. The U.S. Golf also uses Polo electrics.
For the interiors, European Jettas get dressed in more premium-feeling soft-touch plastics and materials, whereas everything for U.S. Jettas is hard-touch. This change also results in more noise and vibration being transmitted to the U.S. passenger cabin. The added ambient noise is also due to less advanced sound insulation (and less of it) being placed within the panels.

It's interesting that we now know for sure that the US Jetta has the Polo wiring harness because it doesn't need all the options of the other wiring harness.
 
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