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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a broken wire to the plug for the engine speed sensor located down low, sort of behind and to the right of the oil filter housing. It is difficult to reach behind the housing and all the hoses. (photos attached) I have no reason to suspect that the sensor is bad, but only want to remove the plug to repair the wire. I have read what the Bentley service manual has to say and found no easy way out. However I am wondering if anyone has figured out how to get that plug off the sensor without removing the oil filter housing?
Also please tell me if there is no other way to do it so at least I'll know how to proceed.
BTW I have the transmission out and although the DMF has only 1/4" of play, I plan to replace it as well since getting to it was a chore. So I was wondering if it's easy to get the engine speed sensor plug off from inside while the flywheel is off.
Thanks in advance.

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Those are really clear shots of the sensor from the rear with the flywheel off. Thanks for the link.
I can see that I will have excellent access to the sensor and the electrical plug once the flywheel is off.
I think I can disconnect the plug from the flywheel side and work it out between the block and the oil filter to make the repair. (without having to remove the oil filter bracket).
However I think I should go ahead and replace the rear main seal, since I will be right there anyway after I remove the old flywheel.
Apparently it will take a special tool (T10134 ...checked prices on eBay) that will cost me around $100. Do you agree that the special tool is needed?
Thanks again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
BTW This video shows the access to the plug by removing the oil filter, etc. but I think maybe I should go ahead and replace the rear main seal as mentioned above. Or is it better to leave it alone if it isn't leaking? This Jetta has 160,000 miles on it. How long do the rear main seals usually last?
 

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The signal timing is a big thing for the engine running at all, so I would be cautious about going in there without the lockout tool. It doesn't take much crank rotation of a crank journal that diameter to be way too far off! Just a smidge off and you could be screwed. Also rear main seals very rarely leak. I guess if I absolutely needed to be in there for the DMF I might go ahead and replace the seal too. But if the DMF seems like it could wait a while I might go with the simple bracket removal to gain access and just remove the sensor and repair that. Then again I am no spring chickn motivated to tackle bigger jobs as I used to be,. unless I have to. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Summary:
First Question:
Do the engine speed sensors tend to go bad? Should I replace it or re-use the old one? The problem is in the wire (that I carelessly broke BTW) and I have no reason to suspect the sensor is bad. Should I replace it while I'm in there.
Second Question: Is the torque spec for the TTY flywheel bolts in the Bentley manual (44 ft-lb plus 1/4 turn) for clean and dry threads? Also I have read that I should tighten to 44 ft-lbs in steps (let's say 15 then 30 then 44) but I have also read that this leads to incorrect torque and it should be one step.(Who knows what to believe on YouTube.)
I don't see an order specified but best practice is always to stagger the order with opposites. The holes in the crank shaft look a little oily to me (see photo). Eyelash Automotive tire Wood Water Flash photography

Third Question: The aluminum plate (Intermediate Plate) doesn't seem as functional as it is with my other cars where the clutch and half the bell housing are open and exposed to the road. Is there anything lost if I don't replace it?
I didn't know it was there so it got a little beat up in the removal process. I could just beat it back flat.
What does it really do?
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Details:
Moonshot...Thanks a lot for your advice and experience. It has been indispensable.
I have been on another project for a couple of days (belts, water pump, fuel injectors, spark plugs, 1995 Pathfinder)
but I am looking forward to putting the transmission back in the Jetta.
One: I didn't realize the special tool was a "lockout tool." That makes perfect sense. I thought it was some kind of puller or press-in device. So I think I will risk leaving the seal as is, because as you said, these rear main seals very rarely leak.
However I am definitely replacing the flywheel since I am this far in and it has 3/4" back and forth motion (measured at the perimeter) compared to about 1/4" on the new LUK DMF.
I attached photos to show how easy it is to access the engine speed sensor with the flywheel off. Clearly the hole in the block is big enough to remove it externally, but this way it is easy and there's enough slack in the wiring to allow me to repair the broken wire. Should I replace the sensor with a new one?

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Thanks for all you help. I just turned 75 so I'm no spring chicken either .... gettin' a little bored with all the heavy lifting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
So I decided to replace the engine speed sensor. It is just too hard to get access to it in case of failure,
The VW dealer wants $140. I'm pretty sure VW doesn't manufacture that little device, so aftermarket must be ok.
Some of the vendors have them for as little as $30. I decided on the Hitachi for $68. It saves some money, is not the "cheap" route, and there's a good chance Hitachi is an OEM supplier for that part.
 

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You're welcome Joe, yes sir leave threads dry and clean, If threads are lubed up with anything the bolts can over-stretch. I usually use an alternating star pattern and step up the torque value in stages as you mentioned. Mark the bolt heads and flywheel before the final 1/4 turn. That way you know. Fyi, it feels like a lot of torque on the bolts. Also, some people reuse the TTY bolts but that's a lot to ask of them. I would go with new bolts. The aluminum plate looks a little beat up but you should be able to flatten it and use it again. Its needs to be in there because it's may be a shim of sorts for the stack up etc. I'm not positive but don't leave it out for sure.

Glad to see you're replacing the DMF. Good call. The Luk is a good choice.
 
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