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as the title says, im a new member here, and also newly hired at a vw dealer. ive been in general mechanics for a while, but never at a dealer. so far its great, vw owners are a special crew. i can say that as my current mk4 tdi has 526000 kilometers on it. hahaha

looking forward to learning from you, and offering any help i can.

cheers

dsw7_99
 

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lubri moly oil

Hello all, I am also a new member. I just picked up my new 2011 jetta tdi in silver. I was shocked when i asked the saleslady for the proper break in schedule. After about 10 minutes of waiting,she returned with it....jaw drops After doing a littel research, i found out that napa auto parts here,sells 507.00 spec lubri moly oil for the new jettas. Just in case anyone needs or wants to know. Sure glad to know my car had only 3.1 miles on it when i left the lot with it.
 

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re:saleslady

The proper break-in engine schediule. Almost right on with this one that i found. The differences according to the tech that did the PDI on my car,is nothing to haggle over with.


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Rules that apply for the life of the car
-When the engine is cold (below the first 3 white marks at the base of the temp gage) rev the engine to at least 2,500 rpms.
-When the engine is warmed up (above the first three white marks) Rev the engine to no less than 3,000 rpms.
The reason for this is to keep the turbo on boost, clear the VNT guide vanes and apply firm pressure to the rings for optimal sealing against blow-by gasses. The rings need the boost to seal since its a turbo charged engine, babying the engine is detrimental and will lead to issues with compression if done so for very long.
-Keep rpms as close to 2000 rpm as possible when driving at a steady speed. This promotes optimum temperatures for the DPF and keeps the engine in the middle of its most efficient rpm range (1800-2200 rpm).
-Allow the DSG or automatic transmission to determine the optimal gear and engine rpm. It knows better than you... Provided you have it trained to be biased to the sport mode the engines shift points will occur at the ideal ranges.


Redline is defined as the maximum rpm allowed by the engine, in the case of all TDI's it is 5,100 rpm. The maximum physical limit of a TDI engine due in part to it's short stroke is approximately 8,800 rpm (this is when you will throw a rod or damage a piston, this rpm is not possible unless you force a downshift into 1st gear while driving 80mph)

The instrument cluster shows a red BAND starting at or around 4600 rpm, most owners will find that very little power resides beyond this point due mostly to the ECU reducing fueling to respect the smoke map.

Adaptive Transmissions, these transmissions learn based on how you apply the power with your foot. Over time they will modify shift patterns with a bias to a "Sport" mode. Train the transmission to shift as close to the recomended rpm ranges below.

When your engine was first produced the motor was placed in a test cell and "Run-in" by a computer run dyno. The motor after the run-in was DRAINED OF ALL ITS FLUIDS (Oil, Coolant etc), the filters were replaced and a unique break-in oil was installed to promote a proper break-in once installed in the car as well as to protect the engine from corrosion during shipping to final assembly.

The "Break-in oil", YES VW does use a specially formulated "Break-In" oil formulated under an internal "TL" specification and produced by Fuchs. The oil is a group IV synthetic 5w30 formulated to comply with the LowSAPS VW507.00 requirements as well as the TL specifications for break-in. The oil is intended to allow a controlled rate of wear while protecting the engine and allowing the internal parts to seat proplerly during the engines first 10,000 road miles.

First 1,000 miles
Keep rpms below 3,800. Avoid steady rpms. Frequent firm (75%) application of power is strongly recomended up to a maximum engine rpm of 3,800. Avoid the use of cruise control so that you naturally fluctuate the power with your foot.
DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

1,000-5,000 miles
Use the full 5,100 rpm power range. THIS DOES NOT MEAN DRIVE AROUND AT 5100 RPM! This DOES mean to find the rpm range where your cars best power resides. Most owners will find that the best engine operating range to be between 2000rpm and 4200 rpm for the purpose of acceleration. At all costs avoid using full throttle below 2000 rpm the ECU will attempt to prevent you from applying full power in this range, work with it and don't request it with your foot.
Continue to avoid steady rpms and avoid the use of cruise control. occasional application of full throttle (100%) is recomended to help seat the rings. City driving is ideal for breaking in a TDI due to frequent stops and acceleration. DO NOT CHANGE THE ENGINE OIL UNTIL 10,000 MILES!

5,000-10,000 miles
Use of the cruise control is ok at this point since most of the initial break in has occured. Continue to use occasional full throttle accelerations to continue to seat the rings. You will notice the engine become slightly louder during this phase due to less friction from the engine breaking in (normal for a diesel to become louder under lighter loads). If your going on a long drive and you are using the cruise, every so often step on the peddle to accelerate up about 20 mph then coast back down to your preset speed.

Your first oil change is due at 10,000 miles DO NOT change it early! Oil analysis supports 10,000 miles as being realistic for a first change interval. Wear metals will remain at safe levels during this entire first interval thanks to the initial run-in and flush at the factory before the engine was installed in your car.

10,000-60,000
This is when the rest of the break in occurs. The engine from the factory will check out with about 475psi of compression pressure out of the crate. It will take at least 60,000 miles to reach the peak pressure of 510 psi. For the most part once you get to 10,000 miles your compression will be around 490 psi meaning that most of the break in has occured.

60,000-the life of the motor
The owners have followed the advice above and do not have any oil consumption issues. This also means that with the higher pressure the engine is more efficient returning optimal fuel economy and reduced smoke output. I am still of the opinion that if possible use a LowSAPS 5w40 instead of the 5w30 oils ie Mobil 1 ESP 5w40 formula M (MB229.51, .6 Sulfated Ash)
 

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That is a copy-paste from another forum.

The reason I do not state exact miles in the engine-break-in guide here is because your mileage and conditions may vary.

Some things that I do not agree with: "when the engine is warmed up". The engine still has some warming up to do even after the coolant is after the first 3 marks. I would wait until the oil temp (there's no gauge for this though) is fully warmed up. Personally, I would wait 5 minutes after the coolant gauge is in the middle and would call that a warm engine. If it's cold out, this could be longer, if warm, shorter.

"Adaptive Transmissions, these transmissions learn based on how you apply the power with your foot. Over time they will modify shift patterns with a bias to a "Sport" mode. " The transmission doesn't "learn" anything. The idea is right but the word learn is not something I would use. Learn means something new. Adapt is a better word which only means change. They react to input variables by applying those variables to pre-written shift maps. So yes it will change. This is a nit pick but I've learned that "learn" is poor wording. :D

Overall, the idea is right but I don't think it's a good idea to explicitly write RULES and state firm values for every situation. Conditions should determine rpm and whatnot. Some people could read into it and freak out if they took the rpm about 3,800. There's no need for that stress.

"Rev the engine to no less than 3,000 rpms. The reason for this is to keep the turbo on boost," If you install a boost gauge, the small turbo is usually on boost during normal driving. You don't need to rev to 3,000 rpm to keep the turbo on boost. For example, if you're on the highway you might not be at 3,000 rpm but I can tell you the turbo is making boost. If you're accelerating at any rpm on a level road, the car is on boost. The statement as written implies that the turbo will not product boost below 3,000 rpm. If that were true, how do you explain my datalog below which shows about 14 psi of boost at 2600 rpm (this is max boost and was during acceleration)?

So the basic ideas are right but it's not clearly written to the point where I believe it can mislead some people.my two cents
 

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Drive more worry less. FYI, I would use a lubricity additive like Standyne. It won't hurt and can only help proper HPFP break-in. Chitty, how about adding a note for this in the break-in guide?
 
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