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Did anyone think this was real? If they did they deserve to get scammed.
Sadly, there are people who do believe in this. I was on another forum and someone kept saying it was real and I'm pretty sure they were not joking. Many people don't even have a basic knowledge or experience of cars, physics, or even how to research things before you buy. To some, a car is a magic carriage that they just put gas in and then take to a mechanic when the gerbils aren't working.
 

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You can't create energy, but you can transfer what we have sitting in front of us every day to achieve maximum potential... Why is HHO a banned subject? Did myturbodiesel.com sign an NDA or something?
 

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Why is HHO a banned subject?
I just read through the forum guidelines (again) and didn't see any explicit ban on HHO as a topic. However, there is a ban on spam and HHO topics frequently head in that direction.

Why did you feel it necessary to revive a topic that had been dead for 6 years?
 

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You can't create energy, but you can transfer what we have sitting in front of us every day to achieve maximum potential... Why is HHO a banned subject? Did myturbodiesel.com sign an NDA or something?
If it was banned, the thread would have been removed years ago.

You aren't talking about transferring energy, you're talking about getting more energy out than you put in.
 

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The reason why I have revived a topic 6 years ago is bc I have recently finished a hydrogen research paper for one of my college classes & I stumbled upon the use of hydrogen generators for internal combustion engines. This information is new to me & interests me. I would have figured this forum would help, thats all...
 

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The reason why I have revived a topic 6 years ago is bc I have recently finished a hydrogen research paper for one of my college classes & I stumbled upon the use of hydrogen generators for internal combustion engines. This information is new to me & interests me. I would have figured this forum would help, thats all...
You're in college and you have to think about this?

It's perpetual motion in a funny hat.

Look up how much energy it takes to hydrolyze water. Include what's lost as heat. Then you burn it in the car, and half of that is lost to heat. Then you make electricity to run they generator, and most of that power is lost to friction and heat.

Making hydrogen is expensive in terms of energy input.

If this was even possible, this thread would be very active.

The idea that there is some sort of cover-up is also flawed. It isn't discussed because it does not work.
 

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The HHO process kicks off with an alternator running at 70-80% efficiency. There are losses further down the line too. Then you feed it into an engine that is better at making heat than torque. Granted, hydrogen is a fast burning fuel and can run lean. But really?
 

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The HHO process kicks off with an alternator running at 70-80% efficiency. There are losses further down the line too. Then you feed it into an engine that is better at making heat than torque. Granted, hydrogen is a fast burning fuel and can run lean. But really?
Is Diesel a fast-burning fuel? Diesels run very lean.
 

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Is Diesel a fast-burning fuel? Diesels run very lean.
As far as I know, it is not. I suppose at the chemistry level it has to do with the long carbon chain.

I did a bunch of reading on this topic when gas first hit $4 a gallon. It was intriguing. I believe the reason people were seeing better economy numbers was due to the manipulation of the oxygen sensor(s). They fooled the ECM into running leaner than it was designed to for emissions. Leaning out the mixture makes the evil NOx. I can't imagine that catalytic converters would last long in those conditions either. Don't they need unburnt fuel to heat up properly?
 

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As far as I know, it is not. I suppose at the chemistry level it has to do with the long carbon chain.

I did a bunch of reading on this topic when gas first hit $4 a gallon. It was intriguing. I believe the reason people were seeing better economy numbers was due to the manipulation of the oxygen sensor(s). They fooled the ECM into running leaner than it was designed to for emissions. Leaning out the mixture makes the evil NOx. I can't imagine that catalytic converters would last long in those conditions either. Don't they need unburnt fuel to heat up properly?
You can make anything you want if you start with a false assumption.

Gasoline, at normal combustion chamber temperatures, needs to be somewhere close to a 14.7:1 ratio or it does not burn. Stratified charge gets around that somewhat, but basically that's a rule. Look up "stoichiometric ratio" to learn more.

Gasoline engines typically run at somewhere around 7.5:1 compression ratios.

Diesel engines run at very high pressures. So high, that the fuel (whatever it is) burns instantly when it is injected into a chamber filled with very hot compressed air. Compressing the air makes the heat.

The conditions are such that most any mix of fuel and air will burn. This is why diesels run very lean and get twice the mileage you'd get with an equivalent gasser.

Diesel engines are closer to 22:1 compression ratios, call it 3 times higher.

"Fooling" the ECM on a gas engine to run too lean has a very predictable effect: an engine that does not run. A little bit of hydrogen might make it possible to run leaner, but there are so many better ways to gain efficiency (most of which are used now) without the complexity (and huge energy losses) trying to make hydrogen on-board.

We use gasoline and diesel because we can find these energetic liquids in nature, we don't have to make them.

Hydrogen is a promising alternative to gasoline and oil, but we can't "drill" for hydrogen. For all intents and purposes, Hydrogen isn't a fuel, it's a transport -- turn electricity into hydrogen, burn hydrogen in the car. Where the electricity comes from is left as an exercise for the reader.
 
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