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continued from part 1- manual transmission removal.



Remove both driveaxles from the transmission flange. This is visible in the above picture. The bolts are greenish from an anti-corrosion coating. You will have to rotate the wheels to get access to all of the 8mm triple square "12 point" bolts. Do not use an allen or torx bit because they will strip the bolt heads! If the wheels aren't on the ground, counterhold the transmission flanges/wheels by putting the car in park or in gear and having someone step on the brakes. Also use saran wrap or clean plastic to cover the exposed inner CV joints.

Optional: Removing the passenger side transmission flange will give more clearance for removing the transmission and make handling the transmission easier. With the flange in place, it will catch on the flywheel and limit the angle at which you can move the transmission. This is not in the service manual so follow those steps at your own risk. After disconnecting the driveaxle, clean out some of the grease in the flange on the transmission. There is a 6mm allen bolt in the center of the flange as seen in the below picture. If you choose to do this, remove the passenger side axle and flange before removing driver's side axle. If you already disconnected the other drive axle you have to counterhold the flange by putting some axle bolts back in and using a pry to counterhold against the bolts. There may be a c-clip inside holding the flange but it shouldn't be too tight. Pull the flange straight out hard after removing the longer flange center bolt. Stuff a paper towel into the hole to minimize loss of gear oil. Plan on changing the gear oil afterwards to replace lost fluid. See 1000q: manual transmission gear oil change for more details. Warning: you may not have enough clearance in a new beetle or may have a hard time reattaching the flange. See this post for some opinion on this optional step.

There is 1x 10mm bolt holding the upper inspection plate on the rear of the transmission - remove it.


Look above the slave cylinder hole. Remove the ground strap (1x 13mm nut holding the cable). The 13mm nut is sitting on top of a larger 18mm bolt that is holding the transmission. I suggest putting the small nut back once the ground strap is removed so you don't lose it.

Disconnect the connections on the starter and remove the starter. (long 2x 16mm or 18mm bolts). See 1000q: starter removal for more instructions.

Support the engine from above with a fender support at the factory jack points. Do not use an engine lift or other hydraulic lift as the primary support because the hydraulics could fail. Raise the transmission side of the engine about 1/4". This will take the weight off the motor mount brackets for easier removal and help avoid stripping the mounts. The passenger side engine support is the metal loop above the injection pump and the driver's side support is on the cylinder head below the vacuum pump.

Remove the pendulum (dogbone) mount under the engine. See 1000q: dogbone mount replacement for more details.

There are 2 long 18mm bolts on the transmission mount that hold the transmission up that were shown with red x's in an earlier picture. Remove them. Again, the transmission and engine must be securely supported before loosening the mount bolts or else the engine and transmission will fall down.

Lower the engine slightly to get access to the 3x 16mm bolts that hold the mount on the transmission. Remove them (circled below, transmission is out of car for illustration)) and the mount.

The manual calls for a special tools VW 457/1 and 3300a to push the engine away from the subframe. The problem is that there isn't much clearance for the differential. Earlier TDI like the picture below could use a scissor jack instead placed on a flange on the engine (where the oil pan/lower block meet) to shift the engine. At no time should you position yourself to get pinched if the jack slips. For this reason, shifting the engine by hand only a little should be safer than using a jack. I believe the reason why the service manual changed on mk4 vs. mk3 to use this special tool instead of a jack is because the jack could slip and pinch/crush your hands. Disconnect the exhaust as needed to let the engine move without stressing the flex section on the downpipe (pipe coming out of the turbo).


Support the transmission from below with a transmission jack. Harbor Freight sells one with a safety strap that is visible in the above picture. Remove the bolts holding the transmission. Below is a pic after removal. The bolt lengths and torque specs are shown below. See 1000q: torque wrench FAQ for tips on torque wrench use. Removal of the flange bolt marked 18 ft-lb is optional (if you removed the flange).

Push the transmission away from the engine. It should come out easily. If it doesn't, check for interference with the frame, hanging wire/cables, or bolts that are still in. You may find that rotating the differential end (the end with the flanges) up will help you get the transmission out. Removing the passenger side flange as mentioned earlier will also help clear the flywheel. Do not let the transmission hang by the input shaft. Make sure it doesn't hang on the power steering line. Gently lower the transmission once it's clear.

Tip from Dale K: he used a block-tackle (pulley system) hanging from the engine support to lower the transmission. The hoist was rated for 500 lbs so it easily lowered the transmission. More details in this post.

Do not use compressed air to blow the clutch dust out since you don't want to breathe it in. I suggest wiping it off with a wet rag. Cleaning the dust will at least somewhat help extend starter life by keeping dust out of the starter and causing starter bearing failure or a sticking starter.

Transmission installation on VW Jetta TDI

Optional: install a bolt in the top hole to hold the clutch lever in place. This will prevent the throw out bearing from moving around during installation. Remove this bolt after the transmission is on.


Lightly grease the transmission shaft splines and the clutch throw out bearing. Less grease is better than too much. If reusing the old release bearing, do not wash it with cleaner or water, just wipe it down. When installing the transmission, start with the differential side up and rotate it into place once the transmission is almost in place. Note the 2 alignment dowels on the side of the transmission. Once the transmission is tightened, replace the passenger side flange. Lubricate the pass side flange before putting it through its oil seal.

If you are having problems aligning the transmission, wiggle it around but don't let it hang on the input shaft or clutch. If you're stuck, remember that the purpose of the clutch alignment tool is to align the shaft. You could also use some old bolts that are the same thread as the transmission bolts and cut off their heads to use them as a guide to get the transmission aligned. Just make sure that they aren't too long or else they will interfere with installation. Cut a slot in the bolt shafts so you can use a screwdriver to turn them.

Make sure the transmission mount is straight and not loaded or twisted when installing the 3 horizontal mount bolts. They are single use stretch bolts and since they are holding the transmission up in an aluminum mount, I would not reuse old bolts. When installing the 2 vertical 18mm mount bolts, raise the transmission to the mount with the engine support. Don't use the bolts to pull the transmission up because it will damage the threads. The bolts should be unloaded during installation. There is also some play in the oval mount holes. Use the dirt outlines from the old bolts to help see correct placement. If it's crooked the engine/trans won't sit right.

The axle bolts are single use only but it's rare for a garage to replace them. If any of the 12 point bolts were stripped, use a new one (VW# 893 407 237 (8x 50mm) or bilstien axle bolts). Always tighten the axles in a diagonal pattern to about 7 ft-lb to make sure it's seated flat. Then tighten them all the way. Then rotate the axle again and double check the torque. You may find that the driveaxle was slightly crooked. Not replacing the bolts is probably one reason why these bolts tend to loosen. Threadlocker won't work on greasy bolts so I just tighten them a few ft-lb higher to help prevent them from backing out.

Although the service manual shows use of a shipping pin or a M8x35 bolt to hold the clutch lever in place, I don't use it. Just make sure you put the clutch slave cylinder straight in and it should be fine.
If you lost any transmission gear oil, see 1000q: transmission gear oil for some tips on replacement.

Torque specs

transmission and starter bolts (see above picture)
3x horizontal mount bolts: 37 ft-lb + 1/4 turn (single use only)
2x vertical mount bolts: 74 ft-lb (single use only)
2x transmission brace bolts: 18 ft-lb
dogbone mounts (single use only)
subframe end:15 ft-lb + 1/4 turn
transmission end: 30 ft-lb + 1/4 turn
10mm inspection cover bolt : 7 ft-lb
nut on transmission selector weight: 18 ft-lb (single use only but you should be safe with some light threadlocker)
2x clutch slave cylinder bolts: 18 ft-lb
driveaxle bolts: 30 ft-lb (single use only, I go about a few ft-lb higher to avoid loosening)
2x CV boot heat shield: 26 ft-lb

Lastly, here is a 3rd party video showing an overview. Disclaimer: they have nothing to do with this site.
http://youtu.be/8f2uX3L9PdY
 

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the 16mm headed bolts that attach the intermediate mount to the transaxle should be torqued to 37ft-lbs . I tried torquing them to 74ft-lbs and it doesn't work real well. Luckly I stopped after thinking about and checked another source.

Still a great write up, thanks:nana2:
 

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Hi, very good write up, worked perfectly for me! I made a improvised engine support by laying a metal beam across the engine compartment in much the same way as depicted in the beginning of this article, supported on two rubber blocks and hanged the engine on it with a strap! I would just add one thing though, if your gearbox has broken and you pull it out you should under all circumstance's remove the clutch and inspect it for damage since it might very well have been damaged when the gearbox broke! If you drive the car without inspecting the clutch you might do destroy the gearbox!
 

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I needed this write up in August. I actually need to pull the trans again to replace the flywheel since i wrecked the ring gear with the wrong starter. i was afraid before that i would over-stress the mounts if i moved the engine so far forward. is this the case? i feel that i could securely position a jack to safely move the engine ahead if it will not hurt the mounts. also, when removing the passenger axle flange, could you please elaborate on the snap ring? I am planning on changing the gear oil. should i drain it before dropping the transmission to help avoid fluid spillage? Thank you so much for putting this together. this job is really a pain and i think your tips will make it much simpler.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Drain oil before, fill oil afterwards.

The mounts won't get overstressed but the exhaust pipe might.

When loosening any mount, use a hanger or transmission jack! If the engine slips and you're underneath I probably won't hear a follow up post when you get crushed. You can move the engine or trans slightly but make sure it's securely supported BEFORE loosening any mounts.

I don't remember if there's a c-clip inside the trans shaft but I wrote the note so there may be. In any case, it's not strong, just pull the flange out.

Good luck!
 

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Disconnecting the exhaust from the engine/turbocharger will allow for much easier movement. I was able to move the engine forward and shim it with arm force alone.

Draining the transmission sheds a few pounds of weight plus you don't have to worry about spillage. The output flanges are secured with the single cone-head bolt in the middle, you will have to load the spring on the flange to engage the threads, I used a sliding bar clamp (Pony brand).

Instead of a transmission jack, I used an engine hoist. I had help here, it went in easier than it came out.
 

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3x 16mm bolts that hold the mount on the transmission (circled in blue). The bolt on the right is marked incorrectly. The actual bolt is lower down.
 

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Awesome write-up that helped an inexperienced garage mechanic like myself successfully pull my clutch in about four hours. I can't thank you enough!

One question though, before I begin putting everything back together: do you have any recommendations on grease type(s) for the shaft splines and the release bearing?
 

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Good writeup..really had no issues. One point to emphasize is when you go back to install the transmission, altering the angle of the transmission with your jack is really important. The transmission will simply pop into place pretty easily if its aligned properly.

Thanks again.
 

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I was unable to drop the transaxle (don't know why...too much stuff in the way!). So, after fighting with it for 45 minutes, I realized that there was enough room between the engine & the bell housing to swap my DMF for a new Valeo SMF without dropping the unit. It worked very well, and I actually had lots of room (about 6-7 inches).
 

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Here is an easy jig I made to hold the flywheel while removing thew clutch(in the absence of the proper tool) after struggling for a way to hold it.
Ingredients: visegrips, large screwdriver and a bolt

The screwdriver happened to have a good bend at the tip which I think helped hold the wheel. You have to change the direction of the screwdriver depending if you are loosening or tightening. Worked well for me.
 

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Just to maybe help someone else who is gonna do this job I made my own engine support cause I didnt have one and was worried about cracking the oil pan if I tried to support the engine from there. Used 2 2 by 4's which I boxed together then put a turn buckle in between supported by a thick bolt.

Ill post pictures later
 

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going to be doing this job on a mk4 1.9tdi golf but im told i need special socket spline drives to rmove the drive shaft flange bolts clutch bolts and flywheel bolts ? is this right ? what size are they cheers
 

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I just did this last night, I did not have an engine hoist, or a tranny jack, or a engine support, that being said I found it quite difficult, but even though I should have had the correct equipment to make it easier/safer, its still better then walking! anyway I wanted to thank the author and amendments that were made to this post, would have been really miserable without it.
 
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