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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2004 Jetta wagon that has lost power and I assume it is in limp mode. I have checked the error codes and would like to know where to start.

By the way the glow plugs EC was on before the power loss started.

Thanks for the Error Code Program.

EOBD II Error Code: P2102
Fault Location:
Throttle actuator control (TAC) motor - circuit low
Possible Cause:
Wiring short to earth.
Throttle actuator control (TAC) motor.

EOBD II Error Code: P1027
Fault Location:
Intake manifold air control solenoid - short to earth
Possible Cause:
Wiring short to earth.
Intake manifold air control solenoid

EOBD II Error Code: P0245
Fault Location:
Turbocharger (TC) wastegate regulating valve A - circuit low
Possible Cause:
Wiring short to earth.
Turbocharger (TC) wastegate regulating valve.
Engine control module (ECM).

EOBD II Error Code: P2426
Fault Location:
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooling valve - circuit low
Possible Cause:
Wiring short to earth.
Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooling valve.

EOBD II Error Code: P2108
Fault Location:
Throttle actuator control (TAC) control module - performance problem
Possible Cause:
Throttle actuator control (TAC) module.

EOBD II Error Code: P0670
Fault Location:
Glow plug control module - circuit malfunction
Possible Cause:
Wiring.
Poor connection.
Glow plug control module.
Glow plug.
Engine control module (ECM).

Thanks
Cap
 

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I would start with looking at what is 'common' to all of these components, as a simultaneous failure of multiple systems is possible but not plausible. I would spend some time with a Bentley wiring diagram and look for bus point connection discrepancies, near the origin of the branch or near the common chassis point connection, or wire looms and multi pin connectors that have been chaffed/melted... After all, troubleshooting is a process of elimination, and always start with the no and low cost inspections first.

Loose/dirty/deranged electrical connections can be hard to troubleshoot with a meter, as the voltages will float and sometimes test good with no load on them, but when the circuit is energized and appreciable current starts to flow, the system will experience an IR voltage drop due to the voltage losses at loose/dirty/deranged connections.

If you have access to a VCDS, take a look at the signal(s) on these components with the engine running, look for amplitude and quality.
 
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