VW TDI forum, Audi, Porsche, and Chevy Cruze Diesel forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Hey Everyone,

I just replaced my intermediate shaft bearings on my AAZ engine.

I used the parts from this website: https://www.partsplaceinc.com/vw-intermediate-shaft-bearing-15955.html

They say they are reamed.

I've installed the new bearings but now the intermediate shaft won't go in. I busted out the micrometer and it seems the ID (of outer bearing) now that it is installed is 21.44, but the OD of the outer side of the shaft is 21.50.

I'm not sure what to do... I have a couple ideas but I'm wondering if maybe I'm missing a step.

Thanks for the help!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
9,158 Posts
Hey Everyone,

I just replaced my intermediate shaft bearings on my AAZ engine.

I used the parts from this website: https://www.partsplaceinc.com/vw-intermediate-shaft-bearing-15955.html
First posts normally go in introductions else you could get a free fix and we never see you again!!!

Don't think that making an intro will fix this comment as you've already ask the question.

Forum Rules and Guidelines

Car: VW 1982 Vanagon L with [1993] 1.9L IDI (AAZ) change your spec to TD. ;)

Calgary Canada.

Manufacturer: VW, Date(s) Used: 08/1996-12/1998, Model: Golf, Engine Code: AAZ, 55Kw, 75PS, 1.9 Ltr, 4 Cyls, Remarks: Canada ("CDN"): Turbo Diesel
Manufacturer: VW, Date(s) Used: 08/1992-12/1998, Model: Jetta, Engine Code: AAZ, 55Kw, 75PS, 1.9 Ltr, 4 Cyls, Remarks: Canada ("CDN"): Turbo Diesel
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
UPDATE:

I managed to get the shaft in last night. I lubed it up with assembly lube and then inserted the shaft until both rollers were touching the edge of the bearing. I then threaded the pulley bolt in all the way until it started to turn the shaft and then I gently used a 19mm wrench to slowly turn the shaft while applying very minimal inward pressure. Each turn it slowly slid into place. It did go in all the way without a ton of force or a hammer-blow but now it is extremely hard to turn. With force it will turn, but it takes far too much effort to turn. In fact, I'm skeptical a starter motor would even have enough power to spin the damn thing let alone have the engine run itself.

My thoughts now are to buy a flex-hone of similar diameter and slowly sand-and-fit until it has less resistance. The old pulley would turn nearly one entire revolution after a simple flick of the wrist so I have some bearing (pun intended) of what it should feel like or what the resistance should be.

Any tips, suggestions, or helpful directions would be most appreciate. Thanks for your time friends.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
527 Posts
In my eyes the bearing does not fit. Running the engine "as is" now would result in a slipping tooth belt. Your idea might work, but is there an alternative - the bearing from a different source?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I've only found one other alternative; I could use it.

I read somewhere that this is normal and it the two surfaces mate upon break-in. I also read that I could help it along by lightly sanding the bearing opposite 180 degrees of the oil hole (due to wear of the other 180 degrees on the oil-side from belt tension).

First thing I'm going to do though is pull the shaft and make sure the bearing's I put in have not spun and the oil holes are lined up...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
Update: Resolved.

I thought I would provide an update incase anybody has a similar problem or is just looking for insights.

I went back to the garage after a day; I spun the shaft a couple more times as described above. Interestingly, the shaft was much easier to spin. After half a dozen rotations I started to feel it become harder to turn so I stopped. Could be because its heating up, could be because I had run out of assembly lube between the two surfaces. I removed the shaft by rotating the engine on the stand so it pointed down and then, using the same rotating technique as described above, I started to spin the shaft with the wrench. I took the hammer-blunt of a bearing press kit and lighting tapped the opposite end of the shaft through the freeze plug hole on the trans side of the block. The shaft came out nice and easy. I inspected the shaft and it still looked great. I inspected the bearing and it too looked great. Both of the bearings still had their respective oil holes lined up and neither had budged at all. However, my theory about the lube running out was correct. No oil pump means no oil supply; lube is just for initial timing rotations and very first start up.

I cleaned the inside surface off both inner and outer bearings with a super clean non-lint cloth; as too their respective surfaces on the intermediate shaft. I did this for awhile and made sure that all surfaces were as spot free as possible. Thinking on it, any dirt that may have gotten in the lube while I was assembling it the first time is not only very bad but would make it hard to turn. I cleaned all my working surfaces and double cleaned around the entrance to the shaft hole (yeah I said it.) A pair of new gloves and away I went with the assembly lube. I applied triple the amount I applied the first time on all four surfaces. I managed to get the shaft back in (same method as described above) with much less effort than the first time. After it was in, it was significantly easier to turn than before, not as easy as before the bearing replacement but they are new bearings; not worn ones. At this point, I am satisfied that this is alright. After researching its clear the two surfaces will mate upon break-in and the after priming the oil pump/system it will receive lubrication immediately upon startup.

I completed the remainder of the intermediate shaft install by replacing the seal and o-ring of the flange (as well as the stretch bolts) and then TTY.

Hope this helps!!
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top