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Discussion Starter #2
I decided to exchange my 10‑mm injection pump for an 11‑mm injection pump to compliment the other modifications on my MKIV ALH engine (for details see 2003 Jetta GLS TDI). I noticed that there was not a “How-Toâ€￾ for swapping out an injection pump without also doing a full timing belt change, so I decided to write one. I hope someone finds this useful.

This “How-Toâ€￾ can be applied to the exchange or replacement of either the 10‑mm or 11‑mm injection pump on an ALH engine, though the instructions will be slanted toward a manual transmission TDI. There are a few small differences for the automatic transmission, and the Bentley manual should be consulted.

Disclaimer

Anything you do to your own car is AT YOUR OWN RISK! I deny any responsibility or liability for anything that you may do to your car, and for any errors in the “How-Toâ€￾. I'm not a professional mechanic; I just like tinkering with my car. Do NOT do any of this if you aren't comfortable with modifying your engine, and be prepared to deal with the consequences if you do something wrong.

If you intend to use this document as a guide, READ THE WHOLE THING FIRST.

Now to the good stuff!

Parts

10-mm Injection Pump with four (4) new copper washers: VW Part Nr. 038-130-107-KX

or

11-mm injection Pump with four (4) new copper washers: VW Part Nr. 038-130-107-JX

Three (3) Injection Pump Sprocket Bolts: Part Nr. N903-285-04

Tools and Supplies

Metalnerd Part Nr. MNA4KIT7PC: A4 Timing Belt Tool Kit, or equivalent VW tools, which includes:
Part Nr. MN3036 - Universal Sprocket Busterâ„¢ Counter-Hold Tool
Part Nr. MN3418 - Universal Cam Locking Plate
Part Nr. MN3359 - Cam Sprocket Pin (also A4 TDI pump Pin)
Part Nr. MN3333 - Compact 3-way Tensioner Wrench
Part Nr. MN4001 - A4/NB Cam Sprocket Puller
Metric ⅜-inch drive and ½-inch drive socket set, including deep sockets; ¼-inch drive may also be useful
Metric Allen sockets; long
Hose pinch-off clamps
Metric open- and box-end wrenches
17‑mm Flare-nut wrench
10‑mm and 13‑mm offset box wrench
Torque ratchet
Hand operated vacuum pump (e.g., Mityvac Model 04000)
VCDS cable, PC with Windows, and VCDS software
Disposable shop towels
Suggested: Painter’s tape to label bolts/parts
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited by Moderator)
Removing Injection Pump

* Engage the parking brake and place the front of your car on jack stands. If anything, this will save your back from aching.
* Remove any installed skid plate or belly pan. This is mainly in case you drop something through the engine compartment; it will be easier to retrieve.
* Remove the upper engine cover with a 10-mm socket, or pull it off if you’ve retrofitted it like I did.
* If you do not have a torque wrench that will accommodate the fuel lines, take a marker to indicate the current position of the nuts on both the injector nozzles and injection pump. Remove any alternative CCV system (e.g., my Agricultural Strainer CCV system).



* Clean the fuel line nuts with a little brake cleaner, doing your best to collect dirt particles among disposable shop towels. Remove the two metal/rubber clips that hold a pair of fuel lines together with a 10‑mm socket. The picture shows one of the clips removed, and you can see my fuel line nut marking better in this picture.




* Remove the braided fuel return line between the injection pump and Injector Nr. 4, including taking it off the plastic clip attached to the vacuum reservoir bracket. A shop towel helped catch leaking diesel fuel.



* Using 17‑mm open-end wrench, loosen the fuel line nuts. A 17‑mm flare-nut wrench could also be used, but it’s not absolutely necessary.




* Remove the fuel lines in the following order: Line Nr. 3, Line Nr. 4, Line Nr. 1 (hardest to remove from the injector; use the regular 17‑mm open-end wrench), and Line Nr. 2. While removing them, mark the fuel lines individually with their injector number and their position on the injection pump (e.g., Top Front, Bottom Back, etc.), respectively. Again, use shop towels to collect any leaking diesel fuel.




Here’s a picture of the fuel lines removed from Injectors 1 – 4, left to right.



* Wrap the four injectors with plastic wrap to keep dirt from inadvertently entering the injectors, holding down with twist ties or elastic (rubber) bands.

Yes, my valve cover and intake manifold is now BLUE.




* Pinch off the fuel supply and return lines with hose clamps near the fuel filter.



* Pull back the spring clamps on the fuel supply and return lines (blue tape arrows).



 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited by Moderator)
Removing Injection Pump Continued

* Remove the fuel supply and return lines from the injection pump and keep them to the side, making sure you have shop towels handy to catch or clean up spilled diesel fuel.






* Remove the banjo fuel return line cap with a 17‑mm socket, while counter-holding with a 17‑mm open‑end wrench.




* Remove the fuel supply line connection from the top of the injection pump with a 17‑mm deep socket (e.g., impact socket).
* Remove the bumper cover and the passenger side headlight. For step-by-step instructions go to these links:

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showpost.php?p=2585388&postcount=5

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showpost.php?p=2585391&postcount=6

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showpost.php?p=2585396&postcount=7

http://forums.tdiclub.com/showpost.php?p=2585449&postcount=23

* Remove the upper intake pipe and hoses from the EGR valve or race pipe to the intercooler. You may also want to remove the EGR valve or race pipe.



* Remove the upper timing belt guard, which is held in place with five (5) clips.




* If you have a manual transmission, remove the three glow plug wires from in front of the vacuum pump, labeling the wires and glow plugs (e.g., Front, Center, and Back).




* Remove the vacuum reservoir ball with an 8‑mm socket. Remove the vacuum line underneath the vacuum pump, and its support bracket with a ¼-inch drive 10‑mm deep socket and 10‑mm offset box wrench, which has two bolts.




* Remove the three vacuum pump bolts with a 13‑mm deep socket and/or 13‑mm offset box wrench (manual transmission cars). One of the bolts is normal, while two of the bolts have a threaded top for the vacuum line support bracket.



* Remove the vacuum pump, and place it to the side. Don’t misplace the Vacuum Pump Seal, and you may want to replace it with a new seal.


 

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Discussion Starter #5 (Edited by Moderator)
Removing Injection Pump Continued

* Remove the seven valve cover bolts with a long 5‑mm Allen socket. I have a Dieselgeek oil by-pass filter, so I had to first remove the connection on the valve cover from the line leading from the top of the filter.






* Lift off the valve cover and set it aside; keep it clean.



* Set the engine to top dead center (TDC). Both Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes toward the passenger side are to be pointing upwards, the brake booster vacuum pump groove in the end of the camshaft where the vacuum pump resides is to be horizontal, and the flywheel should be at the TDC index mark. Engage the parking brake and put the transmission in neutral.

a. Using the Universal Sprocket Busterâ„¢ Counter hold Tool, rotate the camshaft sprocket clockwise until the Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes are pointing upward and the groove in the end of the camshaft is horizontal. Do NOT turn the cam sprocket counter-clockwise. Be certain to place plenty of shop towels underneath the injection pump because it will expel diesel fuel while the camshaft sprocket is turned.








b. Install the Universal Cam Locking Plate into the camshaft groove. The camshaft pulley may have to be moved one way or the other slightly to get the plate in place. Again, make sure the Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes are pointing upward.



c. Remove the plug on top of the manual transmission, and check that the flywheel marking indicates TDC. For the automatic transmission, Bentley Page 23-15 indicates to align the mark on the torque converter with the lower edge of the opening on the transfer case.

To tell the truth, I can never see this mark on the flywheel; now or when I performed a previous timing belt change.

* Lock the injection pump sprocket with the A4 TDI Pump Pin. Note that the pin must be aligned with the center of the mark on the injection pump cover and the sprocket center bolt - double check it with a mirror. It might help to look for the hole that the pin is being inserted into with the mirror prior to installation. Insert the pin all the way. Again, the camshaft pulley may have to be slightly moved to insert the pin all the way. Ensure that the Universal Cam Locking Plate is still in its correct, horizontal position.




* Remove the three injection pump sprocket bolts with a 13‑mm socket. These bolts should be replaced with new sprocket bolts upon reinstallation. Do NOT loosen the center sprocket nut.




* Mark the position of the belt tensioner nut in relation to the tensioner’s setting. Loosen the nut on the timing belt tensioner with a 13‑mm boxed-end wrench. Do NOT remove.


 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited by Moderator)
Removing Injection Pump Continued

* Relieve the tension on the timing belt using the Tensioner Wrench by rotating the wrench COUNTER-CLOCKWISE. According to the Bentley Page 23-18, it looks as though an Allen wrench is used on the tensioner for an automatic transmission.






* Temporarily remove the A4 TDI Pump Pin, slip the timing belt off of the camshaft and injection pump sprockets, remove the injection pump sprocket, and then reinsert the A4 TDI Pump Pin.




* Unclip the harness connector for the injection pump from its retaining bracket, which is located toward the back of the oil filter housing, and disconnect.




* Remove the three (3) front injection pump mounting bolts with a 13‑mm socket.




* Remove the rear injection pump mounting bolt from the support bracket with a 13‑mm socket. It’s the greenish bolts in the below picture.




* Carefully slide the pump shaft out of the assembly bracket and lift the injection pump out of the engine compartment. Be sure to clean up any diesel fuel that may have spilled. There will be plenty of spilled fuel.



If you need to change your thermostat then now is a good time to do it. As can be seen in the above picture, the access to the thermostat and its housing is optimal when the injection pump is removed. I did change my thermostat and its housing using this How-To: http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=264619

* Remove the A4 TDI Pump Pin from the injection pump because it’s no longer needed, but rather will be used to install the new injection pump. Here’s the removed 10‑mm injection pump.


 

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Discussion Starter #7 (Edited by Moderator)
Installing Replacement Injection Pump

* Remove all the packaging materials and plugs sealing the port openings from the replacement injection pump. You may choose to leave the plugs on the injection pump until the various fittings are going to be reinstalled to ensure that inadvertent dirt doesn’t make its way into the fuel connections; just be sure to remove them during the reinstallation.

Make certain that the injection pump came with four new copper washers. One is already in position behind the return line union. Two will go on either side of the banjo return line. The fourth is for the fuel supply line union (left side where black plug is located).



* Install the injection pump onto the support bracket, hand tighten the rear mounting bolt, and place the connector wires into its wire clip/holder.
* Position the injection pump in the bracket and tighten the front bolts with a 13‑mm socket to18 ft‑lb (25 Nm), and then tighten the rear bolt with a 13‑mm socket to18 ft‑lb (25 Nm).



* Remount the injection pump sprocket onto the pump hub and loosely install the three (3) new injection pump sprocket bolts into the injection pump sprocket, positioning the sprocket so that the bolts are in the middle of the elongated holes. Do not tighten the bolts quite yet, but leave them loose.
* Lock the injection pump sprocket using the A4 TDI Pump Pin, making certain that the pin enters the alignment hole toward the top of the injection pump and not to the side of the hole (common mistake). If you cannot find the proper alignment hole, temporarily remove the injection pump sprocket to locate the hole, and then reinstall as directed in the previous step. The pump hub may have to be moved slightly with a 22‑mm wrench to get the A4 TDI Pump Pin inserted completely.




* Ensure that the crankshaft is still at TDC: Recheck that the Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes are pointing upwards, the brake booster vacuum pump groove in the end of the camshaft where the vacuum pump resides is horizontal and the Universal Cam Locking Plate is still in place.
* Using the Universal Sprocket Busterâ„¢ Counter-Hold Tool, hold the camshaft pulley still while loosening the bolt with a 19‑mm socket. Do NOT remove the bolt at this time, but only loosen.




* Make certain that there is a gap between the washer and camshaft pulley. Re-check TDC.




* Release the camshaft sprocket from the camshaft taper using the Cam Sprocket Puller. After installing the puller, use a 17‑mm boxed-end wrench to turn the puller bolt clockwise until the camshaft pulley snaps off of the tapered end of the camshaft.




* Place the timing belt onto the injection pump sprocket and tensioning roller, and thread under the idler roller. The camshaft sprocket may need to be removed in order to get the timing belt to be installed.
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited by Moderator)
Installing Replacement Injection Pump Continued

* Using a mirror and a light, be sure the tensioning roller retaining tab on the upper left is correctly seated in the hole in the timing belt guard.




Here are pictures of how the timing belt is routed. Picture are thanks to www.myturbodiesel.com:





* Temporarily tighten one of the injection pump sprocket bolts modestly, but not too tight, while the bolt is in the middle of an elongated hole. It’s not being torqued yet, and will be re-loosened.
* Using the Universal Sprocket Buster™ Counter-Hold Tool, hold the camshaft pulley still while reinstalling the camshaft sprocket bolt by hand, but not yet torqued.
* Loosen the injection pump sprocket bolt that was tightened earlier, and make certain the A4 TDI Pump Pin is still in place and centered in its elongated hole.
* Again, ensure that the crankshaft is still at TDC: Recheck that the Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes are pointing upwards, the brake booster vacuum pump groove in the end of the camshaft where the vacuum pump resides is horizontal and the Universal Cam Locking Plate is still in place.
* Ensure that the two holes on the tensioner are rotated to the bottom, and that the tensioning roller retaining lug is correctly seated in the hole in the timing belt guard. Hand-tighten the nut on the timing belt tensioner.




Picture from Bentley Manual Page 23-18

* Using the Compact 3-way Tensioner Wrench in the center holes of the belt tensioner, tension the belt by turning clockwise until the notch and the raised mark are aligned. Cars with an automatic transmission use an Allen wrench on the belt tensioner, according to Bentley Page 23-18.




Picture from Bentley Manual Page 23-18

* Tighten the tensioner lock nut with a 13‑mm boxed-end wrench to what feels like “Good-and-Tight”, while maintaining the tensioner position with the Compact 3-way Tensioner Wrench. With the engine mount bracket in the way, it is impossible to get a socket and ratchet on the tensioner bolt. This is likely why the Metalnerd Compact 3‑way Tensioner Wrench comes with a separate 13‑mm wrench. It is also why it is recommended to mark the tensioner nut in the Removing Injection Pump Section.

Using a mirror, ensure that the notch and the raised mark are alighned on the tensioner.

* Ensure that everything is still at TDC and that the A4 TDI Pump Pin is still in place.
* Using the Universal Sprocket Buster™ Counter-Hold Tool, hold the camshaft pulley still while reinstalling the camshaft sprocket bolt with a 19‑mm socket to 33 ft‑lb (45 Nm). Some have recommended increasing the torque by about 20%, which means 40 ft-lb (54 Nm). It's up to your comfort level.
* Tighten the three (3) bolts on the injection pump sprocket bolts with a 13‑mm socket just enough to hold the sprocket. Then tighten them to 18 ft‑lb (25 Nm).
* Remove the Universal Cam Locking Plate.
* Remove the A4 TDI Pump Pin.
* Using the Universal Sprocket Buster™ Counter-Hold Tool, rotate the camshaft CLOCKWISE for two complete rotations. Compression should be felt during the rotation, which will go away if everything is timed correctly. If the compression does not go away and/or it feels like a valve is being hit then carefully turn it back and re-check all the TDC setting and bolts for correct torque setting. If for some reason the transmission was placed into gear, place the shifter into neutral.

Once the two manual rotations are completed, the Cylinder Nr. 1 should be at TDC with the lobes in the up position.

* Reconnect the harness connector for the injection pump wiring, and slip the connector into its retaining bracket.
* Reinstall the three (3) bolts for the vacuum pump with a 13‑mm deep socket and/or 13‑mm offset box wrench to 15 ft‑lb (20 Nm). Remember to include the vaccum pump seal.
* Reinstall the valve cover with a long 5‑mm Allen socket to 7 ft-lb (10 Nm). In my case, I had to reconnect the Oil By-Pass filter line to the valve cover.
* Reinstall the vacuum line support bracket with a ¼-inch drive 10‑mm deep socket or 10‑mm offset box wrench underneath the vacuum pump, and then the vacuum line.
* Reinstall the three glow plug wires in front of the vacuum pump.
* Reinstall the upper timing belt guard, which is held in place with five (5) clips.
* Reinstall the EGR or race pipe, if removed.
* Reinstall the upper intake pipe and hoses to the EGR valve or race pipe and to the intercooler.
* Reinstall the passenger side headlight and the bumper cover in reverse order of disassembly.
* Reinstall the fuel lines (2, 1, 4, 3) by tightening to the lines marked at the beginning of this modification with a 17‑mm open-end wrench, making sure they are adequately tight.
* Pull the rubber plug from the injection pump fuel supply inlet. Install the fuel supply line connector on the top of the injection pump with a 17‑mm deep socket to 18 ft‑lb (25 Nm), using one of the new copper washers.
* Install the banjo return fuel line and cap nut onto the injection pump with a 17‑mm socket to 18 ft‑lb (25 Nm), using three (3) new copper washers; one between the injection pump and the union, and one each on both sides of the banjo return fuel line.



* Reinstall the braided return fuel line from Injector Nr. 4 to the injection pump, including placing it back on the plastic clip attached to the vacuum reservoir bracket.
* Reinstall the two fuel line clips with a 10‑mm socket.
* Reinstall the vacuum reservoir ball and CCV system.
* Reinstall the fuel supply line and remove its hose clamp.
* Prime the injection pump by drawing diesel fuel using a hand operated vacuum pump (e.g., Mityvac Model 04000). At first, there will not be much vacuum pressure, but keep pumping. Air bubbles will be seen in the clear fuel supply line, but then they will go away. As soon as the vacuum pump holds pressure, you should see a little diesel fuel exiting the return line.




* Reinstall the fuel return line and remove its hose clamp.
* Crack loose the nut on top of Injector Nr. 3, wrapped a shop towel around it, cranked the engine a few seconds until some fuel comes out, and then retightened the nut. Repeated on Injector Nr. 2. This will additionally center the timing belt on the pulleys and allow the tensioner to remove any slack.




* Start the engine. It should take only a few seconds of cranking the engine before it starts. The engine will likely cough and shudder a little, but then quickly settled to a nice idle.

If the engine will not start, even after priming the fuel line, recheck TDC and check if you missed something.

* Check to make sure there are no fuel leaks. Also, if the thermostat was changed then be sure there are no coolant leaks and the level of coolant is correct.
* Reinstall the skid plate or belly pan, and lower the car off of the jack stands. Re-check the coolant level if the thermostat was changed.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited by Moderator)
Fine Tuning the Injection Timing with VCDS

* Assuming the car is running OK, rev the engine at about 2,500 rpm until the coolant temperature gauge is sitting straight up (ideally at least 85°C or 185°F). Alternatively, go for a drive until the engine is heated up.
* Keep the car running at idle.
* Connect the VCDS cable to the car’s OBD2 port and to your Windows PC. Start up the VCDS software.
* Click the “Select†button under Select Control Module.



* Click the “01-Engine†button.



* After VCDS has established a connection with the ECU, click “Meas. Blocks – 08â€.




* Select Engine Measuring Block 000 and click “Go!â€.



* Click the “Switch to Basic Settings†button.



* Click the “TDI Timing†button, and a graph like this will appear, and the glowplug light on the instrument panel will flash.



* From the drop down menu in the lower right corner, select either “1.9l R4 TDI AGR/AHF/AHL Golf/Jetta (pre 04/1999)†or “1.9l R4 TDI AGR/AHF/AHL/ASV Golf/Jetta (post 03/1999)â€, depending on the year of your car.




* The horizontal and vertical yellow lines apex is where the timing is set, and should be between the upper green diagonal line and the bottom red diagonal line. If there are no yellow lines, the timing is very retarded, and if there is only a vertical yellow line, the timing is very advanced. An adjustment to the injection pump sprocket will need to be made.

Here’s a link to an excellent discussion about advance vs. retarded timing, exhaust gas temperature (EGT), and fuel economy: http://forums.tdiclub.com/showthread.php?t=240450 .
You will need to decide if you want your timing advanced, retarded, or right in the middle. Slightly advanced timing above the center blue diagonal line will likely cause slightly higher EGTs, engine stress, and higher power. As seen in the picture, my timing was nearly dead on without making any adjustments (was not planned that way).



I tend to advance my timing just a little.

* If you need to adjust the timing, shut off the engine.
* Remove the upper timing belt cover.
* Loosen the three injection pump sprocket bolts with a 13‑mm socket.
* Slightly rotate (and I do mean slightly) the injection pump center hub (shaft) using a wrench carefully on the center nut on the injection pump shaft. Rotating the center hub (shaft) counter-clockwise will retard the timing, and rotating the center hub (shaft) clockwise will advance the timing.
* Retighten the three (3) bolts on the injection pump sprocket bolts with a 13‑mm socket just enough to hold the sprocket. Then tighten them to 18 ft‑lb (25 Nm).
* Recheck the timing using Steps 1 – 11

In this picture, I advanced my timing too much and had to adjust again.



It took me three adjustments to get the timing slightly advanced, as I like it.



* Reinstall the upper timing belt cover.
* Reinstall the upper engine cover with a 10-mm socket, or push it back on if you’ve retrofitted it like I did.
* You may need to clear some engine and other fault codes with VCDS after all is finished. Make certain that any fault codes were created while replacing the injection pump, and that you don’t some unrelated problem.

That’s it. Drive and enjoy!
 

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I usually take the IP out, by only taking the fuel lines out of there without taking the vacuum ball out..., for a faster view of the timing graph from the chart VCDS, instead of clicking meas block, you click on 04 basic setting then next page you click (GO), then click Tdi timing,,,,,,my best results on the timing belt chart to leave it at 68 deg, just touching the upper lines, best mpgs and lower egt's in all my TDI cars with that setting, your car may be different, if TB is just off a little all this setting would have to be set different.

by the way great write up..
 

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for a faster view of the timing graph from the chart VCDS, instead of clicking meas block, you click on 04 basic setting then next page you click (GO), then click Tdi timing,,,,,,my best results on the timing belt chart to leave it at 68 deg, just touching the upper lines, best mpgs and lower egt's in all my TDI cars with that setting, your car may be different, if TB is just off a little all this setting would have to be set different.

by the way great write up..
2nd

the writeup is now mirrored in the FAQ with minor edits (like the order mentioned above, higher contrast in the screenshots in VCDS, and a few videos of timing belt tensioner movement) You have won the bi monthly contest and get a KermaTDI thank you certificate for your contribution! Links can also be viewed below:

TDI injection pump removal without replacing the timing belt (part 1)
TDI fuel injection pump replacement without replacing the timing belt
(part 2)
 

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Primeing fuel pump

Got a question, I replaced the top and end seal where the injector lines hook up, with the diesel geek instructions not completely removing the end or removing all the screws. I have all the injectors tight and cant pull fuel through the top line coming from their instructions. Got any hints.
 

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You can try loosening a line at injector, wrap THICK rag around it, crank until rag is wet. try to pull as much fuel as possible to minimize dry cranking first.
 

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this is really great in preparing me to swap out an injection pump. What I dont get is why it is necessary to go thru the steps of removing the valve cover, if timing belt not being replaced... just confirm TDC another way... then mark and retain the belt position, loosen tensioner, slightly get belt away from pump sprocket and slip out pump and reintsall at original marks>>> set timing ...done? The pump only has one setting to retain its position with the pin, mark belt upon removal, make sure motor doesnt spin ofcourse, re install with all belt lined up as it was removed.... for that matter dont even need to be at TDC ( i will re think that) , just mark belt position in relation to the pump position and r and r the pump? Correct me if Im wrong, but alot of this seems to be motions that dont need to be gone thru, steps are ofcourse taken to assure that TDC is set when performing this work as to avoid any mistakes but still TDC could be set with out taking off valve cover could it not. I am new to this site and new to TDI's but have been a Diyer for my whole life, performed rebuilts, many timing belts etc in the field of auto repair among most all repairs on several different vehicle types including farm equipment, diesel machines etc.... . Maybe I should study basics of this motor because I dont know how many revolutions a complete cycle is with the pump etc, but still logic is telling me it does not have to be made this difficult, just find TDC and mark belt and swap pump.

Thanks in advance if any one responds to this, I am just trying to wrap my head around this process. Thanks
 

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In post #5, the camshaft is rotated together with the engine (with installed timing belt) using the sprocket counterhold tool. Similar in post #8. Exactly this method of rotating the engine has to be regarded strictly excluded because of overstressing the timing belt.
The mandatory check of the belt tension and cam position after turning the engine by hand two times was forgotten.
This really not great.

The described timing adjustment with having the begin of injection aleady within the middle area of the spec range is of no effect, because the injection timg is controlled by the ECU.
 

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Hi i replace my feul injection pump on vw golf 1.9 tdi alh engine car now start bout smoke on accelerating anyone can help ?
 
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