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I don't think this is realistic.

Although it could be done with modern technology, so could a lot of other things. Automakers drag their feet on seatbelts and the catalytic converter, why would they want to have higher mpg unless they can profit from it? In the last 20 years, fuel mileage and power AND emissions have gotten better for some cars but there hasn't been a quantum leap in average mileage for all cars.

article below

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Hillary Clinton's energy plan includes a fuel efficiency standard of 55 MPG by 2030. For comparison, Edwards proposes 40 MPG by 2016, Bill Richardson 50 MG by 2020 and Obama 40 MPG by 2016 but with a 4 percent increase each year. The Energy Bill, currently being debated, may be 35 MPG by 2020. Hillary's plan is not all sticks and includes some very large carrots: $20 billion of "Green Vehicle Bonds" to help U.S. automakers "retool" their plants so vehicles will hit 55 MPG.

Hillary wants to increase current renewable fuel goal from the current level of 7.5 billion gallons by 2012 to 36 billion gallons per year by 2022 and to 60 billion gallons by 2030. The energy plan calls for a greenhouse gas emissions target for cellulosic and other advanced biofuels to ensure that they move over time towards a standard of emitting at least 80 percent fewer greenhouse gases as compared to gasoline. The energy plan also include loan guarantees to spur the first two billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol capacity.

Hillary's energy plan also calls for a $10,000 tax credit for plug-in hybrids, $2 billion investment in battery research and 100,000 PHEVs in the federal fleet by 2015. AutoblogGreen is all about green transport but there are some really good ideas about smart power grids development and new law forcing corporations to consider climate change that just might impact large automakers in a green way too.
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Who knows? Hybrid technology could be that quantum leap.

The big problem is not just mileage but emissions. Conservation is a big step here. You can get 55 mpg but if you have a lead foot and only carry one person in the car it is more wasteful than if you drive normaly and carpool.
 

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Anyone remember the early 90's law that stated zero emissions cars in CA? It was crushed and forgotten. 25 years is a long time for political promises to be ignored.

I think there will be a quantum leap though because of new funding and a public interest in this area that ther wasn't in the last 25 years. I remember reading about research that could make a new type of capacitor that could replace car batteries or be used to power homes. Instead of having a huge brick, your plug in car would have a few thin panels spread out in the body and would recharge in 1 minute instead of 5 hours...because it's a capacitor and not a chemical battery.

Of course, it was only research and most research doesn't turn into a finished product anytime soon but it's a start and an idea.
 

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I think 40 mpg is more attainable. Taking into account all the heavy trucks and SUVs, regular cars will have to get 50+ mpg just to make up for SUVs getting 30 mpg...and that would be a lot.

That extra 15 mpg is still 38%....that's a lot.
 

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They will never meet a goal if none is set. I say set a realistic goal, the laws will probably get changed in 10 years anyways.
 
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