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Discussion Starter #1
While replacing the timing belt on my 2000 alh jetta I noticed it looked like the front seal had been leaking, so fabricated a tool to remove the timing belt sprocket so i could replace the seal. After removing the seal retainer I could see that there is a small groove where the inside lip was riding .
Is it possible to install the seal where it rides on unworn area of the crank.
I think it's to deep to try and polish out. The old seal look hardly worn. The car has almost 300k on the clock. I went ahead and picked up a new oil pump chain and tensioner while I have it torn down.
Although the old chain was just slightly stretched.
Any ideals on the seal?
 

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I'm not sure what year they changed over but the later cars changed to teflon seals. A replacement seal might be the rubber spring type so make sure your replacement is teflon. It should bridge the gap. Am I correct in thinking that your seal is the rubber spring type?

FYI, there is a writeup contest for step by step pictorials so if you're willing to take step by step pics of oil pan removal and oil pump chain and tensioner replacement, it would qualify for the contest and help many others. :)

Also, the crank sprocket bolt is a single use bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The dealer said this is the updated seal?

The VW dealer said this is the updated seal.
It is the rubber type with spring. I have also read
some posts somewhere were some where having
trouble with the new Teflon seals leaking.
I'm kinda on the fence with this one. I would hate to
go through the labor to replace the seal.
I would like to get this done right the first time.
 

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The VW dealer said this is the updated seal. It is the rubber type with spring.
This isn't the first time we've heard of questionable "information" coming from someone at a VW parts department.

What's the part number you were given? If it's 038 103 085 E (look at the small print on the seal itself), then it's a teflon seal with no spring... If the suffix is "C", then it's for a gasoline-model car...

To put in the teflon seal (once it's in the housing/carrier), use your fingers (with a clean plastic glove) to gently "push out" and expand the opening so that it fits more easily over the crankshaft nub... Since you'll be letting it "rest" for hours afterwards, it will recover its shape...

Yuri
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Teflon seal

Will the teflon seal ride on the clean crankshaft area or in the groove left by the old seal?
 

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It should bridge it or be in different spot. The old seal has 2 lips, the sharper one probably left the groove. The teflon seal has a single wide lip. Once you have seal in hand you'll see. Feel free to take pics :)
 

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Discussion Starter #7
seal part number

the front seal the dealer gave me is a 054-115-147-B which is the old style rubber with spring.
Has anyone here have good luck using the teflon seal?
I went ahead aND polished the the groove out of the crank. 500 grit to 1500 grit. I did this to my cummins diesel during a rebuilt and used a updated teflon seaL with zero leaks.
I'll probably take the seal to exchange for the teflon version.
 
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