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I read a post once, not sure if it was here or on Fred's about the care of the CV boot. Someone had posted that at every oil change he cleans his CV boots and than lubes it with a silicone spray, and that
has increased the life span of the boot, sounded like a good regiment to me!, but my question is, could you not use Armor All in place of the silicone spray? and would it not lubricate the boot in the same way as silicone Spray?
 

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I would think water would wash away a coating. It couldn't hurt....unless it's one of those really thick sticky gummy coating which causes dirt to get stuck to it. I don't know how much Armor All would do. I think it's mostly a glossy UV protectant but not sure about the active ingredients.
 

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Interesting subject.

I found the folowing advise from http://www.cvaxles.com/cv_boots.htm

"Take care of your cv boots.
One of the main causes of failure in cv boots is road grime collected from normal driving.
This road grime is abrasive and eats into the material of the cv boot.
Over time it cuts it like a knife eventually leaving your cv joints exposed to the elements.
By wiping them off with a mildly soapy rag you will remove any collected road grime.

DO NOT apply any rubber protectant as it will attract dirt and grime.

If you drive a lot of dirt roads this needs to be done more often.
"

Below is my my two cents
They make a good point about what to use to clean them.
Soap.
They might also add, to be more clear, is do not use brake cleaner or carb cleaner or any thing that will attack the rubber.
Soap would be strong enough and gentle enough on the rubber.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting subject.

I found the folowing advise from http://www.cvaxles.com/cv_boots.htm

"Take care of your cv boots.
One of the main causes of failure in cv boots is road grime collected from normal driving.
This road grime is abrasive and eats into the material of the cv boot.
Over time it cuts it like a knife eventually leaving your cv joints exposed to the elements.
By wiping them off with a mildly soapy rag you will remove any collected road grime.

DO NOT apply any rubber protectant as it will attract dirt and grime.

If you drive a lot of dirt roads this needs to be done more often.
"

Below is my my two cents
They make a good point about what to use to clean them.
Soap.
They might also add, to be more clear, is do not use brake cleaner or carb cleaner or any thing that will attack the rubber.
Soap would be strong enough and gentle enough on the rubber.
Thanks, I found this very informative. I plan to clean mine every 10,000 at oil change. I guess a soapy rag, using a little bit of dish soup should do the trick. :thumbsup
 

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Talking with a Raxels rep, he told me that one of the best ways to extend boot life was to minimize extremly tight turns. Apparently all European cars are designed to handle small tight turns in order to navigate the roads over there. Good for manauverability over there ... bad for boots over here!
 
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