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I need to replace camshaft and lifters. Can/should the teflon seal be reused? (just replaced TB on Saturday)What is the advantage/dis-advantage over the spring seal available? Some descriptions state that you must wait 4hrs for seal to form to shaft. Really necessary? Is there a collar available to slip over the keyway to prevent damaging a new seal? I found a new camshaft on WorldImpex for $130, is FEBI a reputable brand? Is locking the pump and crank in TDC possible, or should I start the timing process from "scratch"?
Thanks for any info.
 
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Do they sell a camshaft seal that is teflon? IMO, FEBI is a reputable brand. $130 is a fair price but also check tdiparts and kermatdi and dieselgeek for parts. You don't have to redo everything because you're not removing the belt, just resetting timing so oyu need to check TDC.
 

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Yes, I think there is a teflon seal that comes from the newer engines. It should, in theory seal better than the older spring style seal. I believe that teflon has more lips in the seal to form and because it spreads out, can cover a tiny defect in the seal surface that a spring seal could not. The material is supposedly more resistant to the oil and suspended soot in the oil. Over a long period of time, the older spring style seal could wear a groove, the teflon seal supposedly does not and because of the larger lip, could cover the groove from the older style seal. Because of these reasons, teflon is supposed to be better.

You do not prelube the teflon seal during installation, that may be part of the reason why you wait for the seal to form to shaft. You do prelube a spring/rubber seal with oil and can use it right away. A teflon seal should come with a collar, if not you could just use a socket. You could always use a piece of paper to cover the keyway or any other sharp edges.

FEBI is a VW OEM supplier. Here are some links for the camshaft:
http://www.kermatdi.com/servlet/-strse-317/alh-camshaft/Detail

http://www.tdiparts.com/catalog/product_info.php?products_id=626

I would:
lock the pump and crank. Make sure the flywheel stamp is showing TDC. Slip the belt off the camshaft. Remove the camshaft. When you put the camshaft back on, it's just like a timing belt replacement except you don't have to remove the motor mount and belt. Here are more tips on removing the camshaft. It's some notes on removing the head, just follow the applicable steps and ignore the ones that do not apply to you.
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http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q_how_to/a4/head_removal.htm

good luck!
 

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avoid the teflon seal

On the ALH,AHU and 1Z engines I'd recommend that you do not use the newer teflon style cam seal.

If you do use this seal then I most urgently recommend the Victor Reinz teflon seal which will come with the proper installation sleeve.

The seal I perfer is made by "DPH" which is a near exact copy of a Vought aircraft hydraulic dual lip seal.
For the A-4 VE TDI The DPH cam seal is the best.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
An explanation...

I should explain the teflon seal question, the last and current seal on the camshaft is the teflon flavor. I was told that once a camshaft has run on a teflon seal, a spring seal will leak due the coating left behind. The dieselgeek TB kit I installed came with a spring seal only, and oil leaking on my new TB concerned me. Since this next evolution will be bought piece-meal, I'd like to get it right the first time.
Thanks for all the quick info.
 

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No problem with the FEBI part, VW contracts a lot of the parts out. Same thing with the timing belt parts, Contenental, INA, are all good brand names.
 

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The seals

I think I'm well-known on another popular TDI link for my cylinder head work...

There are two popular seals for the cam. VW uses the silicone style springless seal since about 2002 on their cams.

The problems with the usual spring style seal is that the spring holds the seal's knife edge hard against the running surface. Eventually, you eat a groove into the cam running surface. If you ever replace the seal or oftentimes, just disturb the #1 cam bearing cap, the seal will not find the same groove and it will leak. The recommendations are that you can replace a spring type seal with either spring or silicone, but you cannot replace the silicone with the spring-type.

The springless silicon seals have a different sealing system and approach. The crankcase pressure is what holds the sealing surface of the seal onto the running surface of the cam. The seal lays flat in relation to the cam. This makes no groove into the cam. The seal has VERY LONG life and is easily refit and reused. Once you've seen the difference, you're sold for life.
The springless seal POLISHES the cam to a mirror finish.

But it does require careful installation or you will roll the sealing edge over on itself.

I definitely use the Silicone style seal.

In order to properly install the seal without problems, I first install the seal BACKWARD (cup out) onto the camshaft. This swells the seal out to the size of the cam bearing surface. Wiggle it in and it spreads the seal very evenly and that opens it up, just enough for an easy fit.

Then, turn the seal around, reinstalling it the proper direction, with the flat of the seal out and the cup in. Push it squarely into the cam cap and tighten.

The manufacturer recommends leaving the seal alone for 4 hours before running the engine. Seriously, I haven't had a problem with my technique, but I would suggest sticking with manufacturer's recommended procedure.

Frank
 

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Makes sense, the OP was using a new camshaft too. Silicone, I thought it was a teflon seal :dunno Sounds good though!
 

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Makes sense, the OP was using a new camshaft too. Silicone, I thought it was a teflon seal :dunno Sounds good though!
The seals often say PTFE on them. That is the running surface. The rest of the body of the seal is Silicone.

Like I said, they can be a real pain to install. You get a rear main seal wrong, and it could really ruin your day. But when they go in right, they last and last without damaging the crank.
 
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