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does anyone know the brake bleeding sequence for a 2002 TDI Jetta with automatic trans? Book says one thing, internet another. Can't seem to get all the air out. New pads, new master cylinder, new calipers on rear, and still spongy brakes.
 

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You're best to use a pressure bleeding kit and start from the furthest wheel from the master cylinder to the nearest e.g. If the master is on the left you would do rear right, rear left, front right, front left and vice versa. I've found it near impossible to get a decent bleed on newer cars though without a pressure bleeding kit. Hope this helps.
 

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Well I don't know if its the same on the Jetta but a friend of mine has a 2005 Seat Leon and he replaced the calipers and put larger ones on with larger discs and drained the system. When he came to bleed the system the pedal movement was long and he couldn't find out why. I Googled for this problem and I think they use the master cylinder of the mk4 Golf and because its angled quite steeply they added another bleed nipple on the master cylinder to remove the trapped air. Now you can't see the cylinder fully because of where its situated on the bulkhead behind the engine you have to feel around to find it. He bled it from that nipple and the brakes are now perfect. ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #6
thanks for the help ,i was using a cheap vacuum type bleeder,i think the lf rf lr rr bleeding sequence is what finally got all of the air out of the system. brakes solid now thanks again to all who posted
 

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Well in all the years I've been working on cars doing a full system bleed with full air in the system I've always bled the brake nearest the master cylinder, then the next nearest and so on, its always worked for me. ;)
 

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Sorry, reread original post, see it's an auto.

Don't forget to do the clutch too, if it's a manual transmission. It's part of the same system so you need to bleed that after the brakes, same process.
 
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