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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone from this way of the world,

This website is probably the best VW enthusiasts site I've come across. Very very helpful and I hope one of you kind folk will be able to offer me some advice please.

My other half has a 2003 Golf GT TDI 130 (PD) and since I have known her it has had a whistle. It whistles when you firmly accelerate in any gear, but if you accelerate gently it doesn't. So initially I thought it was a boost leak. I set about making a home made boost keak tester as follows:

80mm silicone coupler, galaxy hot chocolate jar lid, tyre valve and washer/clamps etc:



75mm to 40 mm silicone reducer, tuna chunks tin (cleaned) and clamps:



Fitted as follows:





Now I don't own an air compressor, so I used a garden pressure sprayer and tapped in a pressure guage. This can hold 50 psi before it starts leaking air so does the job:



I capped of the breather pipe for the cam cover and pumped away. As quick as I was putting air in, it was seeping out. I tracked it to the charge cooler (intercooler) and found it pouring air out from one of the seems. So I got a replacment and fitted it today. I re-tested the system and seem to have a fairly tight system.

However, it STILL whistles when driving!!! I cant believe it. Now my partner tells me it only started whistling when she had a new exhaust fitted (front section) about two years ago and before I had met her. Could there be a leak on the exhaust side of the turbo? Interestingly there is a flexi joint just after the turbo in the exhaust which leaks smoke if you cause the engine to stall!? You can see the scorch marks on the flexi joint. Could this be the cause of the whistle?



I'll try and get some video's posted of what I mean by the smoke coming from the flexi joint when causing the engine to stall.

Hope someone can help.

Best wishes
Steve
 

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Yeh it could, it's very likely that it's leaking from there, that's where they always go, at the expensive part. The intercooler doesn't look to healthy either, I'd consider getting one of those front mounted ones from ebay, I think they're less than £80 and by the looks of things you could easily make it fit and redo the boost pipes for it. I don't know if it'd be worth getting second hand because it's probably a common fault on our side of the pond with all the salt and that on the roads.:)
 

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Yes, and they could have cut out the cat or muffler. That will cause some serious turbo whistling.

Where there's smoke like that there's a leak...unless you've got a unique updraft coming through the exhaust tunnel which is blowing exhaust all the way back to the engine bay...which isn't likely. You can see soot buildup around the flex pipe on the heat shield...

At least you found the boost leak! PS, I added the intercooler video to the boost leak article, it may help someone else as well!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thank you guys. I purchased a new stock intercooler from ebay and came the next day for £117 which is about $189 for everyone else. Fitted perfectly and is made by Valeo who made the original OEM intercooler. Just not badged as a VW part.

My girlfriend tells me that the cat went in the first place and she got a good deal on a whole new exhaust. The exhaust runs from the turbo, down the flexi joint to the cat then to a seam in the exhaust clamped to another section running to the back box. No other signs of soot scorching I can see.

I will try and get it up on a ramp or something with the engine running. If you sharply raise the revs to 3000 rpm you can hear the whistle when the car is not moving. Generally the whistle occurs whilst the car is in motion.

No worries with the video. For some reason my phone wouldn't record sound otherwise the air gushing noise would have made it better.
 

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Small Exhaust Leak Inspection Technique

When you get the obvious 'smoke leakers' fixed, you can locate small exhaust system leaks with a telescoping inspection mirror. When an exhaust leak touches the mirror it will fog it up. The telescoping requirement is just to keep you from burning yourself and to get into tight locations.

Glass mirrors work the best and you can do a system response check by placing the mirror at the tailpipe to make sure that the conditions are right for the moisture in the exhaust gases to condense on the inspection mirror face.
 
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