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Good news for MB, it marks the beginning of urea injection.

STUTTGART, Germany — Mercedes-Benz on Thursday announced that it is "continuing its diesel initiative in the U.S." with the debut of the 2009 GL320 Bluetec, ML320 Bluetec and R320 Bluetec. The trio will go on sale in the fall in all 50 states. The news means that everyone in the U.S. will soon have access to a Mercedes-Benz SUV equipped with a diesel engine.

"These vehicles now have a urea injection [called AdBlue] which makes them 50-state [compliant]," Rob Moran, Mercedes-Benz USA spokesman, told Inside Line. "Bluetec enables a diesel to be as clean as a gas engine, in simple terms. For 2009, those SUVs become available in 50 states and become Bluetec, not CDI models. CDI is the 2008 model that is only available to be registered in 42 states."

Moran said the Bluetec versions will "get about the same fuel economy as the CDI versions.... The engine is the same, but there are exhaust system and software changes," he noted. "They have a reservoir of fluid in the trunk which is injected into the exhaust and causes a chemical reaction, making it clean. That fluid is now certified by the EPA. That is the big news here."

The three Bluetec diesel SUVs are powered by a 3.0-liter V6 that delivers 211 horsepower and 398 pound-feet of torque. The engine is linked to a 7G-Tronic seven-speed automatic transmission. Mercedes-Benz said the GL320 Bluetec returns 17 mpg in city driving and 23 mpg on the highway. The ML320 Bluetec and R320 Bluetec return 18 mpg in the city and 24 mpg on the highway.

Moran said pricing on the Mercedes-Benz Bluetec SUVs will be announced in September
http://www.edmunds.com/insideline/do/News/articleId=125188
 
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IMO, trucks need to get emissions instead of worrying about the few diesel passenger cars out there.
 

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IMO, trucks need to get emissions instead of worrying about the few diesel passenger cars out there.
+1, I don't have any hard numbers but I'm sure diesel trucks put out more emissions than diesel passenger cars. I'm not saying that passenger cars should be exempt, but that diesel trucks should have more emissions controls.
 
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