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I had mine done on Friday, the work order was the same. So far the MIL is off and the car is running fine, so I hope the gremlins are at bay for a while.
 

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I have around 7k miles on my TDI.
Have not experienced any trouble so far.

Should I ask for the firmware update or are they supposed to do it on their own?
 

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Had the car towed to the dealer this morning. they updated the software but they have to replace the blowoff valve which they don't have in stock so I can't pick my car up till tomorrow.

Great service at Greenwich, CT VW. They are reimbursing me for a a car rental since they have no loaners in stock.

Hope this fixes it.

My turn.

The coal light flashed 3 days after I took the car home (300 Mi). I turned off the car to look it up and when I turned on the car I had no problem.

2 weeks later (today)(2500 mi), I went to go back out of the garage this morning it came on and it hasn't gone away. Getting the car towed today to the dealership.

Let's see what they say.
 

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Before you start blaming the EGR valve you should probably read this.

VAG DISESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS

Courtesy of David Bodily Volkswagen Technical Support Specialist

Diesel Particulate Filter (DPF)

Detailed below is important information outlining the function and features of the Diesel Particulate filter which all members of your team need to be aware of.

Diesel particulate filters are becoming more commonplace on diesel engines, particularly sizes 2.0L upwards. This is in order to reduce the exhaust emissions as required by European legislation.

The prime reason for a DPF is to reduce particulate matter entering the atmosphere. Particulate matter is found in the form of soot, which is produced during diesel combustion. The DPF traps most of the soot which would normally travel down the exhaust and into the atmosphere. The DPF can hold a certain amount of soot, but not a huge quantity and therefore it needs to go through a process called ‘regeneration’ in order to clear the soot loading. When the soot goes through a ‘regeneration’ process it will be converted to a much smaller amount of ash. The ash is non-removable. There are two types of ‘regeneration’, passive and active.

During long motorway journeys, passive regeneration will occur. This needs no intervention from the engine control unit. Due to the raised exhaust temperatures on a long journey (temperatures between 350 and 500°C), the procedure occurs slowly and continuously across the catalytic-coated (with platinum) DPF. The catalytic-coated DPF is situated close to the Engine, therefore the exhaust gas temperature is high enough (500°C) to ignite the soot particles. Due to this soot is burned-off and is converted into a smaller amount of ash.

Active ‘regeneration’ is when the ECU intervenes when the soot loading in the DPF is calculated to be 45%. The procedure lasts for about 5 – 10 minutes. Specific measures are taken by the ECU to raise the engine exhaust temperature to above 600°C, these include switching off the exhaust gas recirculation and increasing the fuel injection period to include a small injection after the main injection. The soot particles are oxidised at this temperature.

The ECU will trigger a regeneration process, if for some reason this is aborted, ie. customer slows down, stops etc, the process will be resumed when regeneration conditions are once again met, above 60km/h (38mph). This will continue for 15 minutes.

If after 2 attempts of 15 minutes, a successful regeneration has not been possible, the loading will increase. At 50% soot loading, the ECU will continue to maintain maximum exhaust temperatures of 600°C to 650°C to cause a regeneration process. The system will try to run a regeneration process for 15 minutes. If unsuccessful, the system will repeat this process for a further 15 minutes, if still unsuccessful, the DPF light on the driver display panel will then be lit.

The owners handbook states, the DPF symbol lights up to indicate that the diesel particulate filter has become obstructed with soot due to frequent short trips. When the warning lamp comes on, the driver should drive at a constant speed of at least 60 km/h for about 10 minutes. As a result of the increase in temperature the soot in the filter will be burned off. If the DPF symbol does not go out, the driver should contact an authorised Volkswagen repairer and have the fault rectified.

At 55% soot loading the DPF light is lit on driver display panel. At this point the customer should follow the advice in the handbook. If they ignore this information and continue driving the vehicle until the soot loading reaches 75% without successful regeneration, additional warning lamps will light up. At this point the customer will also be complaining of lack of power, etc.

At 75%, regeneration is still possible with the use of the VAS tester. Only when the loading is above 95%, is it necessary to replace the DPF unit.


Operating Status System Response

45% DPF Load Level 1
Normal Regeneration

50% DPF Load Level 2
Regeneration at maximum exhaust temperatures

55% DPF Load DPF lamp
Regeneration from 60 km/h onwards
("See operating manual")

75% DPF Load DPF, SYS and MI lamp
Torque limitation, EGR deactivation,

Regeneration via VAG tester only
95% DPF Load Replace the DPF Unit



The Warranty department has confirmed that if there is no fault on the vehicle and DPF regeneration has been unsuccessful due to the customers driving style and the customers failure to comply with the instructions in the handbook, DPF replacement will not be paid for by warranty.


Common causes for complaint

• Frequent short journeys – Regeneration conditions are not met.
Not recommended for sale in the Channel Islands and inner city driving.

• Customers who continue to drive the vehicle with DPF light on – Continued
driving with the DPF light on and without successful regeneration results in
excessive soot loading of the DPF, to a point where it is above 95% loaded.
At this point regeneration is not an option and replacement of the DPF is
necessary.

• Fault 18434 particle filter bank 1 malfunction – Common fault code. This does
not only relate to the DPF itself, but the entire exhaust gas handling system. This
can be caused by defective temperature sensors, pressure sensors, additive
system components (if applicable), poor connections, wiring issues, etc.



Important Information

• Before diagnosing a problem vehicle or attempting to perform an emergency
regeneration, it is important to obtain a full diagnostic log and read out relevant
measured value blocks. These MVB’s contain important information on the
condition of the DPF system and are essential in diagnosing the fault. When the
DPF light is illuminated, it does not necessarily mean that the DPF requires
regeneration. For further advice, please contact Technical Support with the
information from the diagnostic log and MVB data.

• If a problem vehicle arrives with the DPF light, the engine management light and
the emissions light on. If during your diagnosis and reading of relevant MVB’s,
you find that the soot loading exceeds 75% (but is still below 95%), an
emergency regeneration procedure must be performed with the VAS tester.
Further to this, the customer needs to be educated. They need to understand
why the lights have appeared on the dash panel. Their attention needs to be
brought to the owners handbook instructions, so that they are aware of what the
DPF light means and what to do when it appears. This should prevent
unnecessary repeat visits for regeneration purposes.


I have also found that as the car gets older 30K+ miles, you will notice that the regeneration takes place more often.


ALWAYS, check your oil before any long journey, as DPF regeneration can use a fair bit of oil.



Some questions and answers that may help;


Question: The glow plug symbol is flashing. Why? What should be done?

Answer:
The DPF regeneration has not been completed during normal driving and now DPF has reached its maximum saturation at which it can still be regenerated. The limit value depends on variant and Model Year, but is in the range of 105% - 125%.Possible causes for this are:

a.) Frequent short distance journeys, i.e. high soot loading while at the same time regeneration of the DPF does not take place because the conditions necessary were not fulfilled.

b.) Frequent interrupted regenerations, i.e. the engine was switched off during regeneration. Applies to short journey drivers who have at least fulfilled the conditions for triggering regeneration. If the glow plug light flashes, the vehicle

a.) Engine running since start for longer than 2 minutes.
b.) Calculated saturation higher than 80%.
c.) Coolant temperature over 70°C for at least 2 minutes.
d.) No DPF-relevant faults stored in system.
e.) A defined vehicle speed threshold must have been exceeded (e.g. for >80% loading, 100 km/h)



Question: Under what conditions is regeneration interrupted/ended once it has started?

Answer: Normally when regeneration has been successfully completed, or:

a.) After a maximum regeneration time (20 - 25 min.).
b.) If the engine is switched off or has stalled.
c.) If the engine is left idling for a long time (5 - 10 min.).
d.) If 1000°C is detected by the exhaust temperature sensor.
e.) If during regeneration, a fault is detected on the components relevant for combustion (injection/intake system).

If a regeneration is interrupted once started but before it has been 50% completed, the glow plug lamp flashes on the next engine start (cold or hot) and regeneration begins again once the operating conditions (see 3) have been fulfilled.



Question: How long does complete regeneration take?
a.) In the most favourable case? b.) In the least favourable case?

Answer:
a.) Under constant conditions, i.e. the exhaust temperature necessary for regeneration always lies above the required value, for example during motorway/cross-country driving, the average regeneration time is 10 minutes.

b.) Vehicle conditions such as long down-hill descents, frequent driving in the low-load range (city driving, idling) allow the exhaust temperature to fall. If the conditions for triggering regeneration were fulfilled, the active regeneration time can be extended up to 25 minutes (depending on engine type). If complete regeneration is not possible within this period, the regeneration will be interrupted.



Question: How does regeneration affect the oil life?

Answer: On each regeneration or attempted regeneration, a certain diesel fuel amount is injected into the engine oil which reduces the oil life. If the "INSP" light in the instrument cluster comes on, the engine oil is exhausted and must be changed. Failure to do so could damage the engine.
 

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Thanks for the information.
A really good read.
8000 miles on my TDI and not one dash light, stutter, clunk, hesitation, or stall.
I drive 15 miles each way to work, 5 days a week.
My engine has plenty of regeneration opportunities.
 

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Bavaria,

Thanks for posting.

Sounds like the theroy of "the Italian tune up," might pay off. (right foot planted)

Next to the few examples of failing fuel pump issue, this is reason number two to continue use of diesel kleen for around town trips.
 

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while growing-up, my father (the shade-tree mechanic) never called it
"the Italian tune-up"
but I know exactly what you mean.
I can remember my dad yelling over the loud engine and exhaust sounds of the car he was working on, something like "let's try blowing it out"
 

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I smell a factory recall to update software on all 2010 Clean Diesel VW and Audi's... On my 20 Golf TDI, the EGR valve has gone out twice now. Once at 900 miles and again at just under 2k. Both times, the car simply lost power driving down the road at about 45mph. When the fault occurs, the coil light on the dash flashes constantly. Turning off car would reset the issue and restore power. There are potentially huge safety issues when losing half the available power when you need it most (pulling out into traffic, crossing a busy intersection, etc).

There were no codes to pull when using an OBDII code reader. The first time it went out, VW replaced the EGR valve. The second time, last week, they kept the car and gave us a rental. The story now is that all clean diesel VW and Audi need a software update that is not due out till June. Nice. So VW offered to pay my car note till we get the Golf back and I am in a Nissan rental untill further notice. I asked if I could get a VW loaner and was told no. VW rental? Nope, local rental companies dont carry VW's.

Anyone else encounter this on the new TDI?
Why local rental companies don't carry VW's? Are you sure? When we rent before they carry the VW's. hmm. Probably it depends on the policy of the rental company if they will carry the VW's or not. :D
 

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hiccup

10' Golf TDI 2dr black no options 6spd man.

@ apprx. 1800 rpm @ 35 mph car hiccups or hesitates occasionally.

was worse with cold weather. (purchased in feb.)

only occurs at that speed in 3rd gear. No indicator lights come on.

dealer says no problem found. im the only one who can make it happen.

usually happens when car has been at rest for a good period of time. then upon initial start up and drive for first couple miles, problem occurs once or twice.

any ideas?
 

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This is a common problem. The best theory I've read is that it's an artifact of the emissions tuning. The site has a DPF FAQ which describes it. It appears certain throttle positions make it most likely. I don't think there's a solution so far.
 

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3rd time for flashing glo

Thursday--car showed flashing glo light--into dealer--software update due to recall--

300 miles later; flashing glo light-turned car off/on--good to go---

50 miles later--same again--into another dealer (on long trip)--decided speed sensor shot so replaced

165 miles later--on major interstate--flashing light AND solid engine light--car died in construction zone--back in yet another dealership

Each time the car shuddered and went limp--no pick up--scary for sure--

any thoughts??

2010 Jetta sportswagen--8,7000 miles, new in April--diesel, of course
 

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I don't want to scare you but open the lid of the fuel filter and check for metal dust. Some of these cars have shredding fuel pumps which wreck the entire fuel system. Why are the dealers replacing parts? What error codes are leading them do the replacement?
 

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I don't want to scare you but open the lid of the fuel filter and check for metal dust. Some of these cars have shredding fuel pumps which wreck the entire fuel system. Why are the dealers replacing parts? What error codes are leading them do the replacement?
This is scaring me from getting a TDI. Do owners in Europe see these same issues or is this specific to NA-spec 140hp units?
 

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Thursday--car showed flashing glo light--into dealer--software update due to recall--

300 miles later; flashing glo light-turned car off/on--good to go---

50 miles later--same again--into another dealer (on long trip)--decided speed sensor shot so replaced

165 miles later--on major interstate--flashing light AND solid engine light--car died in construction zone--back in yet another dealership

Each time the car shuddered and went limp--no pick up--scary for sure--

any thoughts??

2010 Jetta sportswagen--8,7000 miles, new in April--diesel, of course
I had a very similar experience with my 2010 Jetta Sportwagen TDI, manual transmission. It turned out to be a bad Turbo Charger Pressure Relief Valve. Apparently it was opening up and preventing the turbo charger from generating sufficient air pressure in the cylinders. I was a bit nervous afer the first mis-diagnosis by my local VW shop (they changed the Engine Speed Sensor the first time) but I haven't had a problem since (other than the weird occasional power hesitation in 3rd gear which others have detailed).

Over all I'm very happy with this car. I've had it since November and it's the best car I've ever had. I'm very glad I bought it and it's exceeded my expectations. (Although the iPod integration to the Blupunkt-supplied RCD-510 is indeed completely lame and desperately in need of completely new software.)

Casey
 

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Well I write programmes and we also use Autodata at work. On there is gives a list of all VAG and EOBD II error numbers, fault location and possible cause. So I made a program with all this data in and you can search for VAG error number, EOBD II error number, fault loction and possible cause, there are 5680 codes in there.

If anyone would like a copy let me know. ;)

My link is EOBD II Error Codes
 

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Discussion Starter #36
Final outcome

As the OP on this thread I figure I should add closure to what I posted about. The dealership here kept us in a rental for 3 months. Every couple weeks I'd call to see about when everything would be fixed and the answer was always the same: "VW of America is working a software update and we expect it to be released the first week of July".

So first week of July comes and I give them till 9 July to fix the damn car or we invoke the Washington State Lemon Law (I read all the criteria for it and we more than met the requirements to invoke it). On the 6th of July they tell me the update is something that will require a change to a point that requires approval by the EPA... which will be another 45 days. The dealership anticipated I would not wait any more and already had several vehicles set aside for me to look at and choose as a replacement vehicle. Of course, VW wanted to avoid the whole Lemon Law issue which was fine by me long as all inconvenience and costs were on them and not me. The wife also did want to wait the extra couple weeks that would have taken to spinup the state to assign an arbitrator that would need to gather facts, schedule times to do whatever, etc.

So the dealership offered 3 manual Golf TDIs which would not work for us since this would be the wife's car and she cant drive stick. Wife just wanted a TDI and wasnt picky about Golf or Jetta so we decided on a Silver Jetta TDI with most options included except Nav. The dealership, at no cost, tinted the windows, added splashguards, stainless exhaust tips, applied paint sealant, and paid me for for package tray I had bought for the Golf that would not fit on the Jetta. We've had the Jetta now for about 45 days and its been fine. Bottom line is when the Wife is happy = everyone is happy.
 

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new 2010 TDI SportWagen EGR problem

On Wednesday, 9/8/10 I took delivery of a 2010 TDI SportWagen which was manufactured in 6/2010. On Friday morning, 9/17/10 with approximately 800 miles on odometer, and while driving on the freeway, the glow plug light began blinking after a chime sounded, and power was reduced as if the turbo no longer functioned. We limped to our dealership which was "too busy" to look at it until the following Monday (today). We got a call at mid-morning saying the EGR has a problem but they need to have their technical support person look at it before replacing that part. They don't know what his schedule is -- i.e. when he will be in this area. "We will let you know when we find out." When I referred to lots of other TDI owners having similar problems which I had read about in online forums the service rep acted as though he had never heard of the Internet or any such VW problems. So, here we are with a rental loaner while our new car spends a fourth day sitting in the repair shop with nothing happening. The worst part is that we have no idea whether it will be today or two weeks from now or even longer before the support person shows up. How is it that VW expects to have a huge surge in market penetration when they treat new VW owners with such apparent disregard of our time and convenience? It isn't alright with me that I have to wait for them. They should be bending over backwards to make things right asap rather than giving me the, "Don't call us, we'll call you when we're good and ready" type of arrogant attitude. I recognize good customer service when I see it and this definitely isn't it. Firstly, they should build a vehicle which doesn't break down within the first two weeks. Secondly, they should have been willing to at least diagnose the problem that same day we brought it in so that they might have summoned the support person three days earlier. Thirdly, they need to adjust their organizational procedures such that it doesn't further inconvenience customers. That is, they just need to fix the darned car right away rather than introduce extra delay in order to comply with their internal policies or whatever it is that is holding things up. We now don't fully trust our new car for trips out of our home area because we fear breaking down on the road. Something is seriously wrong at VW.
 

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So they still don't know what the problem is? Is there another dealer you can find who cares about your happiness more?

Agree on all points. VW needs to shape up their dealer network big time. They could learn a thing or two from Lexus. They don't have the best cars but they have excellent customer service and reliable cars. Just leave out the boring part.
 

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newtovw,
Welcome to the forum.
Please keep us posted.


and frank gannett yahoo com in post #5 on 5/02, how's your car now?
and Deeva in post #23 on 6/23, how's your car now?
and felicity in post #31 on 7/28, how's your car now?

I am looking forward to your next posts.:thumbsup


 

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resolution of EGR problem on 2010 JSW TDI

VW dealer phoned on Wednesday to say my car was repaired and ready to be picked up. Per VW of America technical support, the dealer cleaned and reinstalled the EGR valve. The Service Manager said "VW has a lock on EGR replacements" right now until they sort out why so many TDI's are having this problem. They also drained and refilled the fuel tank with fresh fuel as VW of America claimed my fuel was contaminated. I'm not sure I believe that but the EGR problem DID arise about ten miles after I had refueled for only the second time since taking delivery of my car. The first fill-up was with diesel #2 at a PDQ convenience store and no problems arose afterwards. The second time was at a Cenex service station, also with #2 diesel. I hope the car won't be extremely picky about fuel as I have no way of knowing which are the safest sources, especially when on a road trip out of my home area. So far, the car is once again running great and we're hoping that will be the last of this problem. The service manager told me that the situation with this known problem is currently in flux in that VW is working on a fix right now. He said he had told them that he, "has three cars in the shop right now with the same problem."
 
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