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Hi Folks,

I have a 2000 Jetta TDI manual with 160K miles. I've only owned the car for 8 months. I was experiencing power reduction from about 3300 to 3600 RPMs and struggled to get up to 80 miles per hour up steeper hills. Derek at Exklusive motorsports (forum recomended shop) cleaned my intake manifold and it improved somewhat. He sugested to chip it and I would not be dispointed. I sent my ECU in to get reprogramed. Claims to go from 90hp to 120? I am very happy with it and noticed more power and torque. I still notice the some inconsistant power in 4th gear between 3000 and 4000 rpms up hill.

I was recently told by a local mechanic that I need the EGR tube cleaned. Is that the same thing as the EGR Valve? Anyhow from what I have gathered on this site, instead of cleaning the EGR Tube I can just get the highly reccomended diesel geek race pipe which claims will solve my cloging isues "forever".

I was just about to purchase the race pipe when I read some threads on here that mentioned if you don't have the Anti shutter valve you could be at risk of engine runaway (especially if chiped up).

Question:

I am wondering since I had my ecu reprogramed for more performance, if I do opt for the race pipe, will I be at a higher risk of engine runaway and ruining my engine? I also read that runaway is mostly due to turbo failior and the ASV is more of a safe guard. I read the thred where people have converted their EGR valve into a race pipe and kept the the ASV. I don't have the know how or ability to do this.

If you guys were me, would you opt just to get the EGR tube / Valve (again, are those the same thing?) cleaned, or go the DG race pipe route (making sure my turbo is healthy of course)?

Thanks so much for reading all this and for all of your advice. I am stoked on my TDI purchase!
 

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You are not at more risk of a runaway diesel since this has nothing to the with the anti shudder valve. You do have a greater risk of not being able to stop a diesel runaway if it does happen.

The antishudder valve will remove any air getting into the engine (or oil if its coming through the intake). Oxegyn is essentail for combustion and removing the supply will stop a runaway engine. Obvisouly if you remove your anti shudder valve you loose this safe guard however if you aware that it may happen if it does you can just stall it by putting it into a high gear and braking.

The other purpose of the anti shudder vavle is to reduce vibration (hence the name) when you turn the engine off.

I have a 'race pipe' installed and dont notice any vibration when turing the engine off. I havent had a runaway so cant comment but you shouldnt have a problem stalling the car.
 

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Peter HMR is correct on all points. Read the FAQ for some background and technical info on engine runaways.

As a side note, make sure your chip accounts for no EGR or else it will throw a check engine light.
 

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The ASV does protect the engine in a runaway situation. If you turn the ignition key to off the ASV will close and air will stop entering the engine. It has been demonstrated that it will stay closed until the engine ceases to run (Freds TDI forum). If the ASV is functioning correctly then it also provides protection in a true runaway condition. When the ignition is turned off the ECU is never totally off and will monitor this situation and hold it closed.
 

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The ASV does protect the engine in a runaway situation. If you turn the ignition key to off the ASV will close and air will stop entering the engine. It has been demonstrated that it will stay closed until the engine ceases to run (Freds TDI forum). If the ASV is functioning correctly then it also provides protection in a true runaway condition. When the ignition is turned off the ECU is never totally off and will monitor this situation and hold it closed.
Just to add one more point, a few people have had the stock ASV but it didn't stop a runaway. In most cases it will. There could be a malfunction of the ASV, carbon buildup in the intake could prevent it from closing fully, bad vac valve, etc. There is very little pressure on the butterfly valve since it pivots in the middle but there is still some pressure.

Personally, I left it in place as a first line of defense - shutting the key off is the most logical thing to do, but a runaway engine is a rare occurrence and if you want to install a racepipe, go ahead, it's your car.

The racepipe itself will not increase or decrease the risk of engine runaway at all.
 
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