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Picked up my car about 2 weeks ago and already have almost 1000 miles on it (have only refueled once so far).

I'm noticing some roughness in the powertrain during very specific g-loading situations. Namely, during that floaty feeling you get just after cresting a hill or when a level road transitions abruptly to downhill, the car hesitates and the power delivery gets very rough for a fraction of a second. It's noticeable enough that I can feel my upper body pitching slightly forward as the power goes away for that instant. Then it picks up and everything is fine.

I ran it by one of the service advisors at my dealer, and he suggested it may have something to do with the dual-mass flywheel, and perhaps that the negative g-loading might be disengaging one half of the flywheel.

This occurs during steady driving when I am applying just enough throttle to maintain my current speed. I have not been able to reproduce it during acceleration.

Trying to figure out if this is "normal" or an anomaly with my car. Has anyone else seen this?

Thanks!
 

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It's a "normal anomaly" with your car. Common problem and it most likely has nothing to with the flywheel. Aftermarket tuners claimed to have fixed it but aren't saying exactly how. From what I understand it's believed to be mostly from EGR tuning. This could change as knowledge about the car matures and more info comes out. You should be able to minimize it by changing throttle position.
 

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I have the exact same experience, which I mentioned in my previous posting "procons of..." on this forum. Definitely unpleasant. I'd be very interested to hear about a remedy.
 

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A chip? There's a TSB for a computer reflash out there but it has nothing to do with this hesitation problem. They may release another computer reflash but I think the best way to avoid it is to slightly change the throttle position before going over the hill. In 1 case it was linked to a bad flywheel at 4,000 miles but I think that's the exception, not the rule.
 

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I think it is because the DSG will engine brake as part of its algorithm. When the car crests a hill and you expect it to coast smoothly, it instead engages and pulls you forward in your seat.
 

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I just purchased a Golf Tdi with a 6 speed manual a few days ago, and it does the same thing. It is like it trying to keep the car at the same speed. Instead of speeding up by coasting down the hill. I just figured it is just a characteristic of the car.
 

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I live on top of a hill and notice this every morning as I come down. I read in the manual that DSG will down shift to provide engine breaking and maintain speed. In my situation, this happens when engine is cold and I don't want it reving at 2500-3000 RPM. So, my solution has been that I manually control DSG via paddle shifter and keep RPMs around 2000.
 
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