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Discussion Starter #1
I am about to start the Timing Belt procedure on my 2006 Jetta (BRM).

I got the kit from DieselGeek - They sent a very high quality Gates Timing Belt, A Fleetrunner Micro-V Serpentine belt (green color too; also made my Gates), Geba Water Pump (steel impeller blades, feels like a very solid built unit), and good quality idler, tensioner, etc.

I got the BRM TB tool kit made by Metalnerd (sold by DieselGeek).. and they are very well designed. The crank sprocket holder is a new custom design from metalnerd and fits both types of BRM (earlier/later) as well as ALH. -with good instructions.:D

I got 2 1.5 liters of Pentosin Pentofrost SF Coolant. (is this the right stuff?)

Replacement Nuts and engine mount bolts.:nana2:

I do have a few questions:
First, I am Jerryrigging a engine support out of a 2x4 and supporting it from below with a block of wood and my hydrolic jack. Is that black loop above the alternator next to the oil dipstick a proper engine support point? When I remove the engine mounts, will the opposite driver side engine mounts keep the engine from 'twisting'? I suppose it will.

Also, when I drain the coolant, should I measure how much comes out and just put that amount of fresh new coolant back in? Can I add the Pentosin with the existing remaining factory coolant or would a complete flush be ideal? (Its very pink and clean)

The TB Tensioner is made by Litens Part number 55739 Schaeffler Automotive After-market oHG. Good quality? Made in Canada!

The Dieselgeek kit also came with a rubber Cam Shaft Seal. Do I need to replace that part, or don't fix it unless its broken. Is there a sign to look out for when I am doing the job?

I totally Recommend Dieselgeek TB kits. Very high quality parts. Metalnerd tool-set is of impressive quality. They are also very very very fast. I ordered all of the parts on Tuesday morning and it shipped early Tuesday afternoon.
Thanks for the write-ups on this site, and taking the time to put all of that together. Helping out lots of TDI owners!
 

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Be careful about "jerryrigging" any engine supports, the engine can fall faster than you can move. Safety first!
 

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Can you take some pictures of how the new tool fits? I have not tried it and I was curious how it works, especially since the BRM sprocket is oval vs. the BEW/BHW's round sprocket. You can add to the writeup and help others with this new info!

The coolant is right, I wouldn't bother measuring how much comes out or doing a full flush if it's clean. Just drain and refill. Whatever's left over won't cause any difference in effectiveness in the "lifetime" fluid.

The engine lift point is right. As long as it's secure, anything jerry rigged is fine, just make sure it's safe. Combined with some support from below and the pendulum (dogbone) transmission mount, it should not twist much. When you go to put the mount bolts back you'll notice that there is some play though so note their alignment before removal. There are pics of this in the writeup.

If the cam seal is leaking you could replace it but you would need the special camshaft tools mentioned in the camshaft replacement article to get access to the seal. If not leaking I wouldn't touch it.
 

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Don't forget to use distilled water to mix the coolant. Tap water has minerals and chemicals in it that will cause corrosion.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thank you Chitty, and others! I have been taking loads of pics today. Today I designed a built a engine support beam out of several 2X4 peaces and carriage bolted the jig to the round hole in the frame of the car. I bought some chain and various bits of rigging and a turnbuckle at the hardware store today and it all works great. It supports my weight (135lbs).

Tomorrow is the big day. I'll do a quick write up and photograph the new tool in action once I figure out how it works. Hopefully it does nicely.

Also on the new tool, I'll scan and send you the instructions that came with it. Maybe via PM? Or I can just post it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok
So I'm about half way done. Some questions:

1. When I pulled the hose off the EGR I noticed a bit of sludgey oil and dirt stuck to the butterfly valve thing.. and more sludge an a tiny bit of oil at radiator end. The bottom of the pipe is coated in oil residue and/or liquid oil. Is this normal? I have a tiny leak at the turbo.. maybe a tablespoon full every few months or so, I wonder if this is related/ normal.

2. The coolant is Orange.. not Pink.. Kinda pink, but looks like orange soda. And when I shine a flashlight into it.. It reflects back kinda green. Maybe a trick in the light? Is this the proper color for the coolant? (I bought this car used)

The New Metalnerd crankshaft holding tool worked very well. It bolts onto the crank shaft where the serpentine belt thing bolts go and a little sliding pin hits the hole in the back while the raised bump centers on another hole. It took a long time to get the Cam pin in but it went in nice and easy. However if the cam is in nice and easy, the Crank is tight/ unable to pull it out and vice versa. I am resting for the evening now that its all aligned. I couldn't get the oil cooler coolant hose off even though I managed to get off the clamp easy enough. I'll try again tomorrow.

I got a late start today but its been as per normal so far. I hope I don't have to worry about that oil in the charge air duct thing. Hope thats normal.
 

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1. A little oil in the intake is normal. At the EGR it combines with the exhaust gases and does make a little sludge.

A little oil leaking at the turbo - I don't see how you would know how much oil is leaking there. Do you mean on the outside? It could be from the valve cover dripping down.

2. Mine does not look kinda green, just pink. The later VW mixes have been more purplish. Orange could be something but not sure.

If camshaft and crank are 99.99% aligned but a tiny bit tight it's OK if you have VCDS. You can adjust it later by adjusting camshaft timing. However, it does sound like there was a little bit of slack that moved something. I wouldn't remove them at this point if everything was all set (best you can tell) and the bolts already tightened.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Ok, so I had time today to remove the TB tensioner, idler, waterpump and TB.

The locking pin on the crank shaft is a tiny bit tight, but ok. The locking pin on the Cam is a lot tighter. Is this a big problem? Can I gently spin the Cam with the TB off to make the pin go in easier? Or just leave it as it is. I notived the old Tensioner arrow was nowhere near the notch. The old belt is a bit worn, but otherwise the wear is very even.

The old water pump looks like it has Aluminum propellers instead of plastic.. but its hard to tell. The old water pump is in good shape, but of course, still being replaced. The new one is steel. (Geba). I think 80K miles is a very good time to replace all of these things.

The wooden engine hoist system I designed and built works great! I am counter holding it with another chain. I'll post my pix on all of this as soon as I get everything finished. The engine mount bolts were pure hell trying to get loose, even though I raised the engine to take the pressure off. The writeup procedure on this site is spot on. Its taking me a long time because I am very busy and so progress is slow. So far about 6 working hours, including prep.

Time to start installing the new belt starting with the water pump...:panic::thumbsup

Also there is Medium Blue Permatex Theadlocker on the TB cover bolts. Is this from the factory?

And a good bit of coolant splashed out when I removed the Water-pump. I had a bucket and got most of it, but a good bit ran down and covered the crank sprocket. I have blue shop paper towels and sopped it all up.

The coolant is defiantly pink in some light and orange in other. Very clear though. I'll post pix soon

I am doing this job under my car port. Its very nice weather in Florida this time of year...but pollen is getting everywhere. Its a battle to keep everything covered. Back to work, and thanks for the hints and advice!.
 

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I wouldn't touch the pins if you have VCDS. It'll get adjusted later. If not, I would adjust it so that the tools go in smoothly. The service manual says to loosen everything and reset the belt. I wouldn't do that if you're a hair off because loosening the 3x 13 camshaft bolts and turning the sprocket a little will do the same thing as resetting the belt. The difference on the PD engines vs. the older engines is that the sprocket is keyed to the pulley, the older ones could rotate 360o so this advice does not apply to the older engines.

The blue threadlocker on the TB cover is from the factory.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The timing belt change went very well and the car started up and runs beautifully! Even better with the new belt.

My Concern:
I do notice that the timing belt is hanging over the edge of the cam sprocket by a tiny bit.. almost flush..but a bit of an overhang. The previous belt's wear marks leave me to believe that the belt is a millimeter or two off (toward the engine). Is this because the water pump may not be on straight? I may have tightened the torque slightly differently on the three bolts. I tried loosening them a bit but no luck (loosened while the belt is under tension).
Also what is the triangle pin for that goes in the tensioner? What does it do? Is there a way to relieve belt tension and re-adjust it with out having to loosen the center nut?
'
I can't get my torque wrench in there with the engine mount back on.. so adjusting the belt will mean removing the mounts again. And ordering the replacement bolts. And the aluminum mount. ugh. Unless I can use a C wrench on the nut and guess at the torque when re-tightening it.

Any advice? Leave it alone (its almost flush.. but a tiny hang over- edges of the belt are still frayed because its new).
Also I adjusted the belt to the original belt's wear marks on the cam and crank sprockets during the initial installation because it was too far back (like it is now). However when I hand cranked the engine it slowly made its way back over a few turns. My only guess is that the water pump may not be on straight enough, the cam sprocket may not be straight or flush.
Thanks for any advice on this. I'm tempted to just call it good, but I want it to be right and not cause the belt to wear unevenly because of the slight overhang.
 

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Was the car on jack stands? If it's hanging to the side it could slide a little. I would not touch the water pump bolts once they are tightened. Once you run the engine the tensioner's sides should center the belt.

I believe the triangle pin is to get a little more slack by moving the cam on the tensinoer a little bit. There is no way to relieve belt tension without removing the tensioner's nut.

Is it possible that the water pump or cam sprockets are crooked? Yes but that's where you come in :) Is it possible that the tensioner isn't fully seated and the tang isn't in place? Could be. If you're sure they are all correct, I'd run the engine for a few seconds on level ground and remove the top cover again and take a look. This is just what I would do based on the info you've given :)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Ok, So I took it all apart -with the exception of the engine mounts, and loosened the belt and moved it forward. Evened up the tension and tightened everything. I even removed the water-pump bolts and re-torqued them. Hand cranked the engine and the belt started moving back to the back of the cam sprocket again. I realized at this point that everything is correct.. EXCEPT the cam sprocket is the culprit! So with the belt at full tension, I loosened the three 13mm sprocket bolts and smacked it a mm into place and torqued them back down.. this time starting at the lowest bolt and working counter clockwise for the other two. This worked! hand cranked the engine and the belt stopped creeping over the edge and actually made its way 1mm or so away from the engine. Elated? Yes! this has been troubling me all day.

It looks like this solved the problem.

Do you know where the belt should be seated on the top cam sprocket? I am using the old wear marks as a guide.

Overall, This has been a very successful TB job. I had a good time bonding with my father and the car runs SOOOOO much better! I think it has more horse power too.

80,000 miles is a very good time to do this job.

3/8 in Craftsman Torque Wrench did very well.

I'm going to post pics very soon.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Chitty:

Here is a pic of where the belt was. Its too far over right? I took a pic earlier of the old belt and it was a bit further on the sprocket. This is overhanging by a tiny bit.

 

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I can't tell because you can't see the sprocket. It's fine if it rides right on the edge. Drive it for a little bit and see how it is after a tank of gas or so. It shouldn't cause any damage in such a short period of time unless there's some other problem.
 

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Can you take some pictures of how the new tool fits? I have not tried it and I was curious how it works, especially since the BRM sprocket is oval vs. the BEW/BHW's round sprocket. You can add to the writeup and help others with this new info!

The coolant is right, I wouldn't bother measuring how much comes out or doing a full flush if it's clean. Just drain and refill. Whatever's left over won't cause any difference in effectiveness in the "lifetime" fluid.

The engine lift point is right. As long as it's secure, anything jerry rigged is fine, just make sure it's safe. Combined with some support from below and the pendulum (dogbone) transmission mount, it should not twist much. When you go to put the mount bolts back you'll notice that there is some play though so note their alignment before removal. There are pics of this in the writeup.

If the cam seal is leaking you could replace it but you would need the special camshaft tools mentioned in the camshaft replacement article to get access to the seal. If not leaking I wouldn't touch it.
I saw there was information about camshaft replacement on the BRM engine (06 Jetta TDI). Is it possible to replace the stock cam with a "hotter" cam to increase performance like the old US V8 iron engines, or does the power chip/reprogram do all that for the engine? A dealer told me I needed to replace the cam, lifters, etc due to excessive lobe wear (140k miles). I love the car but was surprised to hear about all that wear on a properly maintained engine. Any ideas? catnip
 

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Colt makes regrinds for these engines that will make a small bump. A chip reflash will do a lot more though.

Sorry to hear about the wear but they are right. If worn, replacement is the only remedy.
 
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