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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey,
My son recently picked up a 2005 Passat TDI and although it has some miles, it is in great condition both physically and running. Just this past weekend, as my son was getting ready to head to work, he noticed that there was coolant on the ground under the car. This is the first time this car has leaked anything. We check it "religiously" because his previous vehicle had a number of issues.

After some investigation we determined it was coming from water pump, so we ordered up a timing belt/water pump kit and started on the process. While removing the lock carrier, disconnecting the lower radiator hose at the thermostat housing, I noticed a small pool of coolant had collected below the thermostat housing as well.

I don't want to read too much into anything, but finding two sources of leaking coolant has made me start wondering if something else has caused it.

Has anyone experienced symptoms like this?

Thanks for taking a look

Joe
 

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Premium Member
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25 Posts
Hey,
My son recently picked up a 2005 Passat TDI and although it has some miles, it is in great condition both physically and running. Just this past weekend, as my son was getting ready to head to work, he noticed that there was coolant on the ground under the car. This is the first time this car has leaked anything. We check it "religiously" because his previous vehicle had a number of issues.

After some investigation we determined it was coming from water pump, so we ordered up a timing belt/water pump kit and started on the process. While removing the lock carrier, disconnecting the lower radiator hose at the thermostat housing, I noticed a small pool of coolant had collected below the thermostat housing as well.

I don't want to read too much into anything, but finding two sources of leaking coolant has made me start wondering if something else has caused it.

Has anyone experienced symptoms like this?

Thanks for taking a look

Joe

Sounds like you found another leak. While you have the carrier out, I would just change the thermostat and o-ring. Plus make sure it's not leaking directly behind the thermostat as there is a hard pipe, that runs to the oil cooler I believe, that has a double o-ring that could be mistaken for a thermostat leak. Either way good luck!
 

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First posts normally go in introductions else you could get a free fix and we never see you again!!!

Forum Rules and Guidelines

Any problems search TDI Wiki as that covers write ups and forum posts.

You need to find where this coolant leak is coming from? Get the cooling system pressure tested. Cylinder head gasket is a common problem.
 

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99 Posts
No one but Keith will catch that first post business, rules are off in another forum.
It could have been one leak, no matter now. Don't know this engine, but if the thermostat mounts with that plastic neck, get a new one of those as well. And don't cheap out on the thermostat.
 

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No one but Keith will catch that first post business, rules are off in another forum.
That rule isn't off any forum only this one. Its this forum that got me dismissed/fired.

I use that rule on the other 2 forums I look after. One rule for one the same rule for everything.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I've read the Wiki about bleeding brakes on the 2004-2005 Passat and noticed that these particular models require the pressure to be at 2 bar/29 psi.

There is mention of using the Motive Power Bleeder. Their documentation recommends 15psi, with a max of 20 psi. Has anyone used the 0100 or 01o9 Power Bleeders at 29 psi on the Passat? Any gotcha's or things to look out for. Or a different model of power bleeder?
 

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I can tell you that the gauge on the small Motive goes to 30. 29 seems high, but if that what it is, that's what it is.
That rule isn't off any forum only this one. Its this forum that got me dismissed/fired.

I use that rule on the other 2 forums I look after. One rule for one the same rule for everything.
Keep up the good work Keith! We really appreciate all that you do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Continuing with my brake questions, we're having some odd behavior with the brake pedal after swapping out the rear brake pads. The pedal won't return back to the top of the stroke after depressing the pedal. (The brake pedal action was fine prior to swapping the pads.)

The behavior is as follows when bleeding. I'm using the manual (helper) process at the moment.

With car off, helper pumps up the pedal, then I open the bleeder until pedal is almost to the floor, then close the bleeder screw. We repeated this several times. I ensured that the reservoir remained topped up with Pentosil Super Dot 4 from a sealed bottle. After doing this the pedal would return to normal position.

We start the engine and the pedal applies the brakes but does not return. The action is definitely different between when the car is running and when it is not.

As I think about this, please correct me if I'm wrong, but the only difference that comes to mind between when the engine is running and when it is not is the brake booster. Or, is the ABS pump involved as well (even though it isn't activated)? Honestly, I've never run into this when replacing pads on any previous vehicle so I'm a bit stumped.

What might cause the pedal not to return following a brake pad replacement?
 

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I am an "upgraded" member
You still haven't made an intro? Upgraded member means nothing.

When you bleed brakes manually you just keep pressing the pedal up and down, you don't close the bleed nipple every time. On a tandem brake system the pedal will only go down half way. Make sure the master cylinder is topped up.

The brake pedal should return, check the pedal operation and lubricate.

Rest your foot on the brake pedal and start the engine. The pedal should go down slight as the vacuum is applied to the brake servo. If it doesn't check the vacuum supply from the tandem pump.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
You still haven't made an intro? Upgraded member means nothing.
I have, right after you mentioned it.
https://www.myturbodiesel.com/threads/new-member-from-the-kc-area-2005-passat-tdi.34938/

but hey, I don't want to be a stickler for the details. And if paying to help support the site and forums means nothing....why offer it? I'm not looking to get into a disagreement with you over posting a question before posting in the introductions.

Thanks for posting your thoughts on the brake bleeding and pedal operation.
 

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Ok sorry I misted that, all other posts are in this thread.

That upgraded member was something Chitty added but the new site owner it means nothing. They do nothing asked only make the Seat and Skoda sub forum.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Well, it wasn't the master cylinder.

Replaced with new, matching, TRW master cylinder, pressure bled with 29psi, and the pedal behavior is still the same.

Using my recently acquired VCDS cable and software from Ross-tech (top notch kit), the ABS pump doesn't run when the output test is attempted. The ABS module has a fault code, that I cleared once already, it is 65535 - Internal Control Module Memory Error.

Using a suggestion from the Ross-Tech forums, I unplugged the module then replugged it in to see if it would initialize the pump. Although there is a "click" sound when I connect to the ABS module via VCDS there is no other noise or functioning. The only selectable option for the output test is "Sequential" and it returns with "Test Completed" after only a couple of seconds.

I'm hoping that someone may have run into this before. And, not having an advanced knowledge of the bosch 5.7 abs, I'm left wondering how swapping the rear pads caused this. Is there something in the ABS pump that could have been damaged, forced, stuck, by pushing the pistons in without the bleeders open and the cap still on the master cylinder?

As an extra bit of information, my son informed me that when he got in the car and depressed the pedal (pushing it all the way to the floor) after the pad change, the pedal did not come back up. He had to pull it up. I would think the spring pressure from the master cylinder would have brought it back up. It pushes the actuator rod back out out of the car.

If there is anyone who has any thoughts/insight into this odd behavior. Please post up a comment.

Thanks for reading.
 

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I too have this issue, but it was due to my introduction of Air in the lines as I let the master cylinder reservoir get too low during a break fluid flush. 2 rounds of bleeding later... and I still have this issue almost licked.
 
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