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Hello All! I have a 2006 Jetta Tdi and need to replace the front wheel bearing assembly. Can anyone tell me what the torque specs need to be? Especially the 12mm triple square bolts. Thanks!!
 

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They are stretch bolts (torque to yield bolts) so don't reuse them.

front hub:
12 point bolt:
Tighten to 70 Nm with wheels off the ground.
Lower car to the ground and tighten a further 90°.

Hexagonal bolt:
Tighten to 200 Nm with wheels off the ground.
Lower car to the ground and tighten a further 180°.

Front hub - wheel bearing housing bolts:
70 Nm+1/4 turn

Brake caliper to carrier:
30 Nm
 

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I know this is an old thread but i see there is a lot of debate on the values for the differet bolts. Do we have any updated info on this? Seems there is a huge difference in torque on the two.
 

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I think Chitty has got the hub and axle description confused, I believe the axle should both be 200NM+180 regardless of whether they are hex or triple square ( 12 point) both should be a 16mm bolt. Note the manual says it should be tightened fully in 2 stages both OFF the ground

70Nm +90 is for a 12mm hub bolt

Here attached a pdf for the front suspension Mk5 Golf 2004-2009, its from the official VW ERWIN factory manual
 

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I just replaced the driver's side front wheel bearing on my early 2006 (uses the early fuel filter) VW Jetta TDi (120K) today. The bearing I got from IDPARTs (
OE Part Number: 5K0498621
Manufacturer's Part Number: WBK5456
Front wheel bearing by *** for the 2005-2014 Jetta and Sportwagen, 2011+ Golf, 2011+ Jetta, 2012+ Passat TDI and 2013+ Beetle TDI. Also fits the 2010+ Audi A3 TDI. )
had T60s for the 4 hub bolts. I hope the torque specs were supposed to be the same (70Nm +90) because that's what I used. The old part did have the 12mm triple square bolts.
 

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I think Chitty has got the hub and axle description confused, I believe the axle should both be 200NM+180 regardless of whether they are hex or triple square ( 12 point) both should be a 16mm bolt. Note the manual says it should be tightened fully in 2 stages both OFF the ground

70Nm +90 is for a 12mm hub bolt

Here attached a pdf for the front suspension Mk5 Golf 2004-2009, its from the official VW ERWIN factory manual
The confusing thing is that the bentley paper manual shows the values I put in the writeup and that the car has to be on the ground. It's such a high torque value that I would feel more comfortable torquing against the ground and weight of the car and transmission vs. just the transmission counterholding it. At this point I'd use your values as it could have been a typo from bentley. Also, one bolt has a washer on it, the other doesn't. It would change the torque felt by the bolts. Not sure which is correct but I'd feel more comfortable using the higher one.
 

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I realize that this is an old thread, and I'm not intentionally trying to reenergize it, but I would like to post the latest information on this for people that may be looking for torque values concerning the Mark V drive axle bolt. I don't like to post things anymore as there are so many 'know-it-all' types that are constantly looking for opportunities to chastise people, but I just wanted to clarify this information for others in the future.

Last October I used the 70 Nm torque on a 12-point bolt when changing out a drive axle. Not even 5 months after installing the new 12-point bolt at 70 Nm with the 90 degree turn, the bolt has 'backed out' and destroyed the bearing. After doing more research on this to try and figure out what I did wrong, this is the information that I came up with. (In a nutshell, gerrywac's post above is accurate)

There were 3 different drive axle bolts made for the Mark V:

1. The hexagonal bolt with washer and smooth seating flange, which was the first bolt VW used and the one mentioned in the Bentley service manual. The correct torque for this bolt is 200 Nm (148 ft lb) with the tire OFF the ground and an additional 180 degree (1/2) turn with the tires ON the ground.

2. The 12-Point bolt with locking ribs on the seating flange. The torque for this bolt was lowered to 70 Nm, tires off the ground, with an additional 90 degree (1/4) turn with tires on the ground.

3. The 12-Point bolt with smooth seating flange. The torque for this bolt is like the hexagonal bolt. 200 Nm (tires up) + 180 degree turn (tires down).

The hub/housing mount bolts are still the same: 70 Nm + 1/4 turn.
The rear bearing/hub bolt is still 180 Nm (133 ft-lb) + 1/2 turn....as far as I know.
Always replace ALL hub/bearing and housing bolts, as they are stretch bolts.

Obviously, all of the past confusion on this has been because of the reduced torque requirement for the ribbed 12-point bolt. I'm assuming that the heavier torque requirement was not needed because of the locking ribs on those bolts. I'm not even sure if the ribbed bolt is available anymore. The one I installed last October was a smooth 12-point, and in my case the 70 Nm with a quarter turn was not enough. Also, since all of the bolts appear to be grade 8.8, even the ribbed bolt could be torqued down to 200 Nm as well, but I guess it wasn't necessary for that bolt.

The real challenge is getting the bolt to turn 180 degrees after the torque of 200 Nm has been acquired. I ended up using a 40 inch long breaker bar to do it. It is so incredibly tight, I thought I was going to break the bolt, but it didn't and everything seems to be okay. The bolt stretches, and I think the final 1/2 turn is what does the trick.

Anyway, if you're here looking for torque settings on the Mark V (2005.5 - 2010) drive axle wheel bearing bolt, you need to install them at 200 Nm (or 148 ft lbs.) with the wheels off the ground and someone holding down on the brake pedal, plus and additional 1/2 turn after you lower the car back to the ground using a BIG breaker bar.
 
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