1. Welcome to myturbodiesel.com, if this is your first visit, please read 1000 answered questions - TDI FAQ, DIY, and Wiki by clicking the link here or in the navigation bar above. Click the "Sign up Now" button to the right to create an account, registration is fast and free.
  2. After you create a free account, every subforum has reply boxes. Here is a thread showing how to create an account or post a new question, shown with pictures

injection pump removal without timing belt replacement: TDI ALH engine

Mar 8, 2014
injection pump removal without timing belt replacement: TDI ALH engine
  • VW TDI ALH engine fuel injection pump DIY removal and replacement
    difficulty: 3/5 because you must reset the timing belt

    Introduction

    The original procedure and pictures are from rocketeer928, thanks! He won the contest for excellent original writeup. This procedure requires resetting the position of the timing belt. See 1000q: timing belt removal for full details. I've added pictures to make it as complete as possible but please refer to both articles.

    All 5 speed ALH TDI engines (1998-2003) use a 10mm Bosch VE injection pump. The 11mm pump comes stock on automatic transmission ALH engines because they use smaller fuel injectors. The larger 11mm injection pump will increase the amount of fuel that can be delivered to the fuel injectors and support higher levels of power modifications. In theory, higher fuel pressure (everything else being equal) also lets you inject the same amount of fuel in a shorter duration and with better atomization. This can give greater fuel economy, less smoke, and more fuel injected (more power). However, the larger injection pump also creates more parasitic power loss to run it and because most of the fuel isn't used during normal driving, fuel economy could also be reduced, everything else being equal.

    NOTE - leaking fuel pumps can have some of their seals replaced while on the car. Switching to a high percentage of biodiesel may swell the seals and stop a small seep. A rebuild would also restore lost IP efficiency but isn't economical just for a leaking seal. The top cover seal can be replaced in 5 minutes with a special triangle and torx sockets, see 1000q: pump top cover replacement for the procedure. The middle seal requires a VCDS and the triangle security and torx sockets. The head seal can also be replaced while the pump is on the car although it requires you to disconnect the metal fuel pressure lines, here is the procedure from dieselgeek. The rest of the seals can be replaced with the pump off the car. Even a small leak can cause hard starting or lost efficiency and over time will melt the coolant hoses under the pump.

    This "how to" can be applied to the exchange or replacement of either the 10mm or 11mm injection pump on an ALH engine though the instructions will be slanted toward a manual transmission TDI. There are a few small differences for the automatic transmission and the Bentley manual should be consulted.

    Rocketeer928's disclaimer (In addition to the myturbodiesel TOS disclaimer)
    Anything you do to your own car is AT YOUR OWN RISK! I deny any responsibility or liability for anything that you may do to your car, and for any errors in the “How-To”. I'm not a professional mechanic; I just like tinkering with my car. Do NOT do any of this if you aren't comfortable with modifying your engine, and be prepared to deal with the consequences if you do something wrong. If you intend to use this document as a guide, READ THE WHOLE THING FIRST.

    Caution: I will not buy any part made by [​IMG] because they are probably low quality counterfeit parts. Many people have had bad experiences with this seller and his parts. I also had a bad experience so never again.

    Parts and supplies (click links to compare prices or have an idea of new part price)
    10 mm injection Pump with four (4) new copper washers: VW# 038 130 107 kx (the x in 038130107kx indicates rebuilt)
    or
    11 mm injection Pump with four (4) new copper washers: VW# 038 130 107 jx (the x in 038130107jx indicates rebuilt)

    Three (3) Injection Pump Sprocket Bolts: VW# n 903 285 04

    Metalnerd Part Nr. MNA4KIT7PC: A4 Timing Belt Tool Kit, which includes (or equivalent VW tools):
    MN3036 - Universal Sprocket Buster Counter-Hold Tool
    MN3418 - Universal Cam Locking Plate (or equivalent VW tool# 3428)
    MN3359 - Cam Sprocket Pin (also A4 TDI pump Pin)
    MN3333 - Compact 3-way Tensioner Wrench
    MN4001 - A4/NB Cam Sprocket Puller
    Metric ⅜-inch drive and ½-inch drive socket set, including deep sockets; ¼-inch drive may also be useful
    Metric Allen sockets; long
    Hose pinch-off clamps
    Metric open- and box-end wrenches
    17mm Flare-nut wrench
    10mm and 13mm offset box wrench
    Torque ratchet
    Hand operated vacuum pump (e.g., Mityvac Model 04000)
    Ross tech VCDS cable and software and laptop with Windows
    Disposable shop towels
    Suggested: Painter’s tape to label bolts/parts

    Procedure
    * Engage the parking brake, chock the wheels, put the car in gear (if manual) or park (if auto) and place the front of your car on jack stands. If anything, this will save your back from aching. Make sure the car and jack stands are fully secure before getting under the car. See 1000q: mk4 Jetta jack points for where the points were on the myturbodiesel car and 1000q: wood blocks for another way to supplement jack stands.
    * Remove any installed skid plate or plastic splash shield. This is mainly in case you drop something through the engine compartment; it will be easier to retrieve.
    * Remove the upper engine cover (3x 10mm nuts) or pull it off if you’ve done the pop off modification, see 1000q: engine cover pop mod for details.
    * If you do not have a torque wrench that will accommodate the fuel lines, take a marker to indicate the current position of the nuts on both the injector nozzles and injection pump. Remove any alternative crankcase ventilation, CCV, system (e.g., my Agricultural Strainer CCV system).
    [​IMG]

    * Clean the fuel line nuts with a little brake cleaner, doing your best to collect dirt particles among disposable shop towels. Use a 10mm socket to remove the two metal/rubber clips (yellow arrows in the above picture) that brace each pair of fuel lines together. While it's not required it'll make removal of the hard lines slightly easier. The picture below shows one of the clips removed and you can see my fuel line nut markings better in this picture.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the braided fuel return line between the injection pump and Injector Nr. 4, including taking it off the plastic clip attached to the vacuum reservoir bracket. A shop towel helped catch leaking diesel fuel.
    [​IMG]

    * Using a 17mm open-end wrench, loosen the fuel line nuts. A 17mm flare-nut wrench will help avoid stripped nuts but it’s not absolutely necessary.

    I suggest putting a drop of PB blaster between the fuel line and fuel line union on the injection pump to help loosen them. Let them soak. Counterhold the 14mm unions on the injection pump when you loosen the 17mm nut. Do not reuse the metal fuel pressure lines if they get bent or twisted! Some PB Blaster or other penetrating lubricant at the fuel injector end of the fuel line nut too won't hurt but it doesn't have a clear shot at the threads. A single small drop on top should help.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the fuel lines (shown below) in the following order: Line Nr. 3, Line Nr. 4, Line Nr. 1 (hardest to remove from the injector; use the regular 17mm open-end wrench), and Line Nr. 2. While removing them, mark the fuel lines individually with their injector number and their position on the injection pump (e.g., Top Front, Bottom Back, etc.), respectively. Again, use shop towels to collect any leaking diesel fuel. Diesel fuel will melt things like coolant hoses so it's best not to let it sit.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    * Use twist ties or elastic (rubber) bands to wrap the four injectors with plastic wrap to keep dirt from inadvertently entering the injectors. Yes, my valve cover and intake manifold are now BLUE.
    [​IMG]

    * Pinch off the fuel supply and return lines with hose clamps. You can clamp them near the fuel filter or near the fuel pump (should let less fuel drip out).
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the braided fuel return line between the injection pump and Injector Nr. 4, including taking it off the plastic clip attached to the vacuum reservoir bracket. A shop towel helped catch leaking diesel fuel.

    * Loosen and pull back the spring clamps on the fuel supply and return lines (white arrows). Then remove the fuel supply and return lines from the injection pump and keep them to the side, making sure you have shop towels handy to catch or clean up spilled diesel fuel. I suggest twisting the lines back and forth where they connect before pulling them off. This will help break the seal so the hoses aren't stressed as much when you pull them off.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    * Remove the banjo fuel return line cap with a 17mm socket while counter-holding with a 17mm open end wrench.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the fuel supply line connection from the top of the injection pump with a 17mm deep socket.
    The original author removed the bumper cover and the passenger side headlight. This is not required for just removing the injection pump. See 1000q: front bumper removal for more details.
    * Remove the upper intake pipe and hoses from the EGR valve or race pipe (the aftermarket silver pipes, shown below) to the intercooler. It's easy to remove a race pipe because it's not attached to the EGR pipes but if you have an EGR valve I would leave it in place unless you strip the valve cover bolts next to it.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the upper timing belt guard, five (5) clips.
    [​IMG]

    * If you have a manual transmission, remove the three coolant glow plug wires in front of the vacuum pump, labeling the wires and glow plugs (e.g., Front, Center, and Back).
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the vacuum reservoir ball with a 6 or 8mm socket. Remove the vacuum line underneath the vacuum pump and its support bracket with a ¼-inch drive 10mm deep socket and 10mm offset box wrench, which has two bolts.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the three vacuum pump bolts with a 13mm deep socket and/or 13mm offset box wrench (manual transmission cars). One of the bolts is normal while two of the bolts have a threaded top for the vacuum line support bracket. Remove the vacuum pump and place it to the side. Don’t misplace the vacuum pump seal. You may want to replace it with a new seal.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Here is another view of the 13mm support bracket bolt and the 10mm nuts sitting on top of them. An offset wrench is also shown.
    [​IMG]

    * Clean the area around the edge of the valve cover. You want to remove it and don't want dirt falling into the engine. If you have VW tool# 3428, you don't have to remove the valve cover. Remove the seven valve cover bolts with a long 5mm Allen socket. You can also use a long ball end allen wrench to reach the harder to reach bolts. If any bolts get stripped, use an EZ-out or wrench to grip the outer diameter of the bolts.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    * Lift off the valve cover and set it aside; keep it clean. The car has a Dieselgeek oil by-pass filter which required removal of the connection on the valve cover from the line on the top of the oil filter.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Set the engine to top dead center TDC. There are 3 checks for TDC: the #1 camshaft lobes (on the timing belt side) should be pointing upwards like a V when viewed from the side of the car, the groove in the end of the camshaft for the vacuum pump is horizontal, and the TDC stamp on the flywheel is lined up with its index mark. These are detailed in the next few steps.

    The normal way of turning the engine is with the 19mm triple square bolt on the crankshaft. This is supposedly the least stressful on the timing belt tensioner. If you have a manual the transmission must be in neutral when you turn the engine over or else the transmission will hold the engine. Since you chocked the wheels and applied the parking brake it won't roll away. The crankshaft bolt is a one use only stretch bolt so don't use an impact wrench on it. It's safe to use the bolt to turn the engine over by hand because the force is low compared to the bolt's torque value and this is how the service manual says to turn the engine over. Because it's more accessible and as a matter of opinion, I feel that using a sprocket counterholding bar on the camshaft sprocket is safe and may be better for this procedure because you don't have as much access to the 19mm triple square crank bolt. If you feel otherwise, rotate the engine by the large crankshaft bolt.

    Using the Metalnerd Universal Sprocket Buster Counter hold Tool or equivalent, rotate the camshaft sprocket clockwise until the Nr. 1 cylinder cam lobes are pointing upward and the groove in the end of the camshaft is horizontal. Do NOT turn the cam sprocket counter-clockwise. Be certain to place plenty of shop towels underneath the injection pump because it will expel diesel fuel while the camshaft sprocket is turned.
    [​IMG]

    Both of the camshaft #1 lobes (closest to passenger side on a North American left hand drive car) should be pointing up in a "V" shape, brake booster vacuum pump slot at the other end of the camshaft should be horizontal (marked with red lines in the pic below). The reason why the camshaft lobes should be pointing up is because this indicates that they are not pushing open the valves. The camshaft lock should fit in the machined slot at the end of the camshaft. If the camshaft lock is in and the #1 lobes are pointing up, the TDC mark on the flywheel should be close to the viewing window on the transmission. If you see the TDC mark and the #1 lobes are pointing down, rotate the engine until you see the TDC mark and #1 lobes are correct.
    [​IMG]

    Now look below the coolant flange. Remove the rubber plug on top of the transmission bellhousing. (red arrow, similar engine pictured below, yours is a newer engine but the plug looks the same)
    [​IMG]

    Turn the engine slowly until the TDC index mark that's stamped onto the flywheel is centered in the window. I painted mine red for faster identification. Pictured below is a manual transmission. For the automatic transmission, Bentley Page 23-15 indicates to align the mark on the torque converter with the lower edge of the opening on the transfer case. The "0" and dashed stamp should be at the frontmost edge (closest to front of car) of the rectangular hole, not the center.

    Below right is a flywheel removed from the car w/red mark. On a manual transmission car, you won't be able to see the "0", you'll only be able to see the stamp. If you see the TDC flywheel stamp but the #1 camshaft lobes are pointing down, just turn the engine until you see the flywheel stamp and the camshaft lobes are pointing up like the picture above.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    At the end of the camshaft is a slot parallel to the valve head cover surface. Test fit the camshaft lock bar into that slot and shim it with business cards or feeler gauges to center it. Do not torque the camshaft lock bar or use it to counterhold the camshaft sprocket or timing belt because it can break the camshaft or tool! The service manual says that if you use the camshaft lock bar to torque, "camshaft damage will usually result", the metalnerd tool also says "not for torque". The camshaft pulley may have to be moved one way or the other slightly to get the plate in place so if the other marks are slightly off, remove the lock and just reinsert it later.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    If you have VW tool# 3428 you don't have to remove the valve cover. In a later step (after the engine is set to TDC) you screw it into the bolt holes for the vacuum pump and tighten the top bolt.
    [​IMG]

    * Lock the injection pump sprocket with the A4 TDI Pump Pin. Note - if you're removing the pump you don't need to index its position by locking it but it's good practice to know how it fits and looks for installation of the new pump.

    The pin must be aligned with the center of the square mark on the injection pump cover and the sprocket center bolt. Use a mirror to make sure that the pin is actually in the correct spot and not to the left or right of the hole. The pin will go through the sprocket, through the pump's grey hub, and into a hole on the injection pump body. Insert the pin all the way. Again, the camshaft pulley may have to be slightly moved to insert the pin all the way.
    [​IMG]

    View of the holes with mirror and on an engine out of the car.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Remove the three injection pump sprocket bolts with a 13mm socket. (shown below with white arrows, one isn't visible) These bolts should be replaced with new sprocket bolts upon reinstallation. Do NOT loosen the large center sprocket nut.
    [​IMG]

    * Mark the position of the belt tensioner nut in relation to the tensioner’s setting. Loosen the nut on the timing belt tensioner with a 13mm boxed-end wrench. Do NOT remove the nut or tensioner.
    [​IMG]

    * Relieve the tension on the timing belt using the tensioner wrench by rotating the wrench COUNTER-CLOCKWISE. According to the Bentley Page 23-18, it looks as though an Allen wrench is used on the tensioner for an automatic transmission.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the A4 TDI Pump Pin, slip the timing belt off of the camshaft and injection pump sprockets, and remove the injection pump sprocket. The pump pin is no longer needed on the old pump. Make sure the camshaft lock is in place and shimmed for centering.
    * Remove the three (3) front injection pump mounting bolts with a 13mm socket. (white arrows, one is hidden)
    [​IMG]

    * Unclip the harness connector for the injection pump from its retaining bracket (located towards the back of the oil filter housing) and disconnect. It has a lock clip on the plug - pull the clip back to release the lock.
    [​IMG]

    * Remove the rear injection pump mounting bolt from the support bracket with a 13mm socket. It’s the greenish bolt in the below picture.
    [​IMG]
    * Carefully slide the pump shaft out of the assembly bracket and lift the injection pump out of the engine compartment. Be sure to clean up any diesel fuel that may have spilled. There will be plenty of spilled fuel. Access to the thermostat and its housing is optimal when the injection pump is removed so if you need to change it, now is a good time to do it. See 1000q: thermostat change for more details.
    [​IMG]

    End of injection pump removal. Procedure continued at 1000q: injection pump installation part 2.