2005-2006 BRM engine timing belt replacement-VW Jetta TDI part 2/3

Jun 12, 2017
2005-2006 BRM engine timing belt replacement-VW Jetta TDI part 2/3
  • back to part 1/3: BRM timing belt removal

    Remove the crankshaft pulley/harmonic balancer pulley/serpentine belt pulley (4x 10mm triple square bolts). One of these 10mm triple square bolts is circled in the above picture. Caution: do not remove the 19mm 12 point center crankshaft sprocket bolt! To counterhold the 4x 10mm bolts, I suggest having a helper put the manual transmission in gear and step on the brakes. This will prevent the pulley from turning and it's easier than using 2 tools in a limited space. You can use a 19mm 12 point socket on the center crankshaft bolt to counterhold. As long as you don't apply great force to the center bolt, it will not damage the center bolt or crankshaft.

    Remove the middle and lower timing belt cover (5x 10mm bolts). Note how the middle piece overlaps the lower piece. Above the car: remove the upper timing belt cover (2 spring clips).
    [​IMG] [​IMG]

    You can now see the timing belt. (This picture was taken after motor mount removal for clarity). Set the engine to top dead center (TDC). The engine is at TDC if the crankshaft lock and camshaft sprocket pin fit correctly. This is detailed in the next few steps. If manual, put the transmission in neutral or else it will hold the engine. You chocked the wheels and put the parking brake on so it won't roll away.
    [​IMG]

    Test fit the crankshaft lock and camshaft pin for TDC. The service manual says to remove the motor mount first but I prefer to turn over the engine clockwise to insert the crankshaft lock and camshaft pin now because the engine is more stable before removing the motor mount. The crankshaft lock will only have the arrow correct and fit at TDC. The camshaft pin goes through the sprocket, through the camshaft hub, and into a hole on the cylinder head. This is detailed below.

    The reason why you must turn the engine clockwise is because there's a little play in the belt system. Although it seems tight, the service manual says that it's not reliable to set the crankshaft lock against the running direction. If you pass the mark and the sprocket moves too far, turn the engine counterclockwise at least far enough for any belt slack to be removed (about 1/4 turn) and try again in the clockwise direction.

    NOTE: According to the service manual, there may be a few very early production crankshaft sprockets that use VW tool# T10050. There have been a few out there, but most will use T10100. T10100 has the arrow at the 1 o'clock position between bolt holes and has a slightly oval sprocket. T10050 has the mark at the 12 o'clock position inline with a bolt hole and has a round sprocket. NOTE: The old metalnerd T10100 equivalent with the silver knob handle is shown. The VW T10100 has a black plastic handle which is not removable.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    When inserting the crankshaft lock, don't push it down onto the crankshaft sprocket teeth, slide the interlocking teeth of the tool forwards into the teeth of the crankshaft sprocket. In other words, don't push it down towards the ground, slide it in towards the engine. The teeth must match up. Also note the raised bump for crankshaft pulley-crankshaft sprocket alignment. The peg on the lock must fit into the hole on the front flange (the metal part behind the sprocket).

    Here is a picture of how it should NOT look. In this case, the teeth were pushed down onto the sprocket instead of being meshed with the teeth and slid forward. If it looks like this you're using the tool incorrectly. Refer to the videos in part 3 for a demonstration.
    wrong.jpg

    Because there have been a few reports of trouble using T10100 and T10050, I now recommend the metalnerd universal PD timing belt tool. On this tool, once the included bolts have attached the tool to the crankshaft sprocket, the pin slides into the index hole. The pin is a tight fit through the tool, so you may have to use a tiny drop of oil on the pin's shaft when inserting it. WARNING: Don't use other bolts because their bolts may be too long! If the bolts are too long, they can pass through the sprocket and damage the front crankshaft seal on the other side! When placing the tool, make sure the small bump on the sprocket is placed over one of the holes on the tool.
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Insert the locking pin 3359 into the camshaft sprocket. It should go in all the way. It goes through the sprocket, through the hub that the sprocket mounts onto, and into the hole on the cylinder head. Verify with a mirror that you see the cylinder head hole bracketed through the slot. Make sure that the pin is engaged into the hole!
    [​IMG]

    Here is a closeup of the hole on the cylinder head on left, with the sprocket removed, and the pulley removed. The hub (pulley) should not be removed during this procedure, the pic is for illustration only. The pin goes through the sprocket, through the hub, and into the hole on the cylinder head to lock the camshaft at TDC. Make sure the pin doesn't go into the empty air space way below the hole. (If you've triple checked the hole position with a mirror and see that the pin won't go in because it's 1 or 2 degrees off, that's OK. Any more than a few degrees and something is wrong. Once you remove the timing belt from the sprocket, use the center 18mm bolt to wiggle the camshaft hub slightly to get the pin in.)
    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

    The camshaft toothed window should be on the upper half of the sprocket (green check mark on left picture). If the pin only goes in halfway then it's not in the hole or at TDC. If the toothed window is in the lower half of the sprocket (red x on right), turn the crankshaft 1 full revolution to get it correct. While you could also turn the engine over at the camshaft sprocket using those holes in the sprocket, this is not recommended. Despite having more teeth engaging the timing belt, it pulls on the tensioner side of the belt instead of the water pump side of the belt. This stresses the tensioner so don't turn it over there unless you're about to discarding the tensioner anyways.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The Bentley service manual mentions a "mark on the rear timing belt cover" but it's blocked by the belt. There is another mark "4Z" stamped into the rear cover which roughly lines up with the camshaft sensor tabs. These marks are highlighted in yellow below (NOTE: the picture below is from a Passat TDI engine. It's not possible to get a clear picture of this on a Jetta with the engine in the car. The only difference on your Jetta is that the lower-right tab is wide instead of both being narrow, and the lower tab is wide instead of narrow. It's otherwise the same.) You can ignore these highlighted marks because they're there to help locate the rough position of the pin hole. The toothed window is a much more visible guide and the camshaft pin is the final say in correct cam position.
    [​IMG]

    Set aside the fuel filter (pull up on the filter housing) and remove the fuel filter bracket (2x 10mm bolts, 1x 10mm nut). Some housings are a little different - if yours doesn't have the tabs for removing it, just unbolt the bracket and set aside.
    [​IMG]

    You must support the engine before removing the motor mount. The factory service manual says to use a support from above. I found that my engine support bar wouldn't fit without an extension because there was no space on the fender for it. You can use this style of engine support if you have an extension arm to move the support hook/chain towards the front of the car about 5".
    [​IMG]

    You can also make your own out of some sturdy wood and chains. Just remember that if you drill into the wood it is weakened. If you want to drill the main beam using two beams is suggested. Make sure to always have a backup!
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Put shackles or large+thick bolt/nut through chains and securely hang them by the lift points. The passenger side lift point is in front of the engine above the alternator (green highlight below) and the driver's side lift point is above the turbo (next few pictures). If you remove the bolt highlighted in red below you can put a chain/shackle through it as well.

    The official driver's side lift point is behind the vacuum pump. To get to the driver's side lift point, remove the turbo intake hose, crankcase vent heater plug, and breather hose (green arrow in the next pic). You need a remote operated hose clamp pliers to get to the lower clamp due to clearance. Because of the hassle, you should be OK to use the pass side lift point to support the weight of the engine + another backup.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    The official lift point is highlighted in green below. Because I was using the support bar as the additional method of supporting the car I just used the passenger side lift as shown above.
    [​IMG]

    I used a block of wood on the oil pan and a hydraulic floor jack as the primary method of supporting the engine and the engine support bar as an additional backup. Why use a backup? Hydraulic jacks are for raising, not holding, and can suddenly fail. Never put yourself in a position where you could be injured if a hydraulic jack fails. Never put the jack directly on an oil pan, especially because the oil pan is aluminum. You can also cut a small groove in the top of the wood to hold the oil pan securely.
    [​IMG][​IMG]

    Raise the engine slightly to get the engine's weight off the motor mount bolts. This helps prevent stripping the aluminum motor mount threads. I suggest a neutral position on the mount. If you lift the engine about 1/5" the mount will be about neutral.

    Remove the motor mount alignment plate (2x 13mm bolts), (2x 16mm) fender-mount bolts, and the (2x 18mm) mount-mount bolts. Ignore the torque specs, they are for installation. Loosen all the bigger bolts before removing them to help hold the mount steady while you loosen the other bolts. Note the alignment of the mount and bolt holes. You can put a dab of paint on the 18mm bolts-mount joint to index the bolt position to the motor mount. Once you remove the bolts you can see the marks from the old bolt heads too. Basically, the upper part of the mount has oval holes for the 18mm bolts so that the engine can be aligned relative to the mount. More details on this in part 2- installation.
    [​IMG]

    Now remove the 3x 16mm mount-block horizontal bolts. Remove the upper-right longer bolt from above. The lower shorter bolt can be removed from below. The middle longer bolt can be removed through the access hole pictured earlier. You should be able to access it without removing the entire plastic wheel well liner. Remove the mount-block mount. If you can't get it out, just work around it.
    The timing belt is now ready for removal. Loosen the (3x 13mm) camshaft sprocket bolts (pictured earlier). You may notice that the sprocket has oval holes around the bolt. The oval holes let the sprocket move independently of the hub/ camshaft within the range of the holes. The bolts are threaded into the sprocket hub. and do not move with the sprocket unless they are tightened. The best position for the hole in the toothed window is in the middle. This indicates that the bolts are in the middle of their range.
    [​IMG]

    Loosen the (1x 15mm) timing belt tensioner nut. Insert a 6mm allen wrench in the tensioner and turn counter-clockwise until you can fit VW tool# T10115, the triangle handle pin, in its hole. Then turn clockwise until it hits the pin and further until it hits the stop. This should give you a little bit more slack so you don't need to remove the camshaft sprocket when removing the belt. If you can't figure it out, you'll be discarding the tensioner anyways so just get the belt off as instructed in the next few steps.
    [​IMG]
    If you have the old style tensioner that uses only a spanner wrench, use a 2 pin spanner wrench to turn the tensioner counterclockwise to loosen. The new one should have the allen wrench hole. There's no difference in using the spanner wrench or allen wrench to tighten or loosen the tensioner since they act on the same piece of metal and the spring/pointer is what determines belt tension.

    Remove the timing belt. The factory service manual suggests removing the belt starting at the water pump. I found it much easier to first remove the 13mm nut holding the idler pulley and remove the pulley. Then remove the 15mm tensioner nut or the 3x 13mm camshaft sprocket bolts. (Removing the pin won't cause the camshaft to move if it's not connected to anything via the timing belt, assuming you don't rotate it). Now slip off the tensioner and camshaft sprocket at the same time. This will give you plenty of play to get the belt off. After the belt is off, replace the camshaft sprocket and make sure pin 3359 still locks the camshaft sprocket and the hub underneath. If it did move, use the center bolt to adjust the hub's position.

    If you want to leave the 3x 13mm camshaft sprocket bolts on and leave the camshaft sprocket on, you can do that too, I've just found it easier to get the belt on with removing the camshaft sprocket and the bolts are already loose anyways.

    Now remove the lower roller/idler pulley (1x 13mm nut) and the water pump, see 1000q: BRM water pump removal. End of part 1- removal.

    For timing belt installation, see BRM timing belt part 3/3. The rest of the detailed installation procedure, pictures, and checks are in the premium content forum, please join our forum and upgrade to a premium account to view. Here is how to upgrade: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/account/upgrades, thank you for your support!
  • Loading...
Jerry Klinesmith and mordoramor like this.