Replacing turbo

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by chacaocop, Apr 16, 2017.

  1. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    122
    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Good day:

    I bought a 2000 Jetta with a blown turbo for my son. Car is very well maintained and is also in due for a new timing belt. I already removed the turbo and yes the blades are damaged and they move all over. I already cleaned the intake manifold as well as the EGR valve. When I removed the exhaust manifold, I encountered lots of oil down the exhaust pipe as well as inside of the intercooler.

    I am replacing the intake oil line, plus the turbo as well as timing belt as I already mentioned.

    My question is, is it necessary to clean the intercooler and the pipes of oil? What happens if I dont? Wont the oil be simply burnt out? If I do have to clean it, what products should be used since I am working out of my garage. Am I missing something that should also be replaced, cleaned?

    Thanks for reading.
     
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  2. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,315
    Car:
    85 kubvan
    remove bumper to remove hedlight.. this way you can remove the ic to let it drain in a oil pan/bucket... this way it can be tipped to drain it.. imo in car is not nuff..

    no reason to make it like new.. the breather will fill it with oil vapor.. but any pooling of oil is bad.. with it outta way and all.. makes the timing belt job easier due to the pipe that connects to the top of it can be removed with ease once headlight out

    the exhaust full of oil... no way to clean it out.. it may cook/bake the oil onto the cat... plugging it up :( but the rest will blow out under hard boosted driving where the egt is high and the turbine is pushing lotsa air out the tail pipe... the bad.. your going to cover the rear in oil... ive had it fill up the inner bumper due to pointed down tail pipe tips.. just ozzes oil in your parking spot... it will smoke pretty good if full of oil till burnt out... think in dark.. get on it.. cars headlights behind you dissapear in the dark... get off the freeway to a stop light.. watch the gas station on the corner go missing like if you were inside it be a spilbergh type "fog" movie.. quite impressive :) think for you power outtage cover eyes dark... them inside.. everything just a big fog you cannot see the gaspumps thru winows... quite immpressive..this was a saab that ate a turbo.. and ill admit.. most fun ever... only way id ever do that job a 2nd time.. is just to unfill the exhaust of oil... the guy who pulled up next to me before the cloud over took... his face was priceless till he was going going.. gone... LOL

    i also suggest a set of glass lense e code headlights.. since for your son.. better light output to see in the dark.. glass does not turn yellow.. reflector puts light in good places vs the crap the usa put in stock... e code = European and well worth the investment.. ive run e codes since i got my licence in 89.. ive played with high wattage bulbs, the hid stuff so on... but unless you have a lense and reflector put light in the right places.. nothing will help..

    those $5 bell deer whistls... put a set on.. will fit in the lower center grill and hides well.. test them out at 35mph by driving past a dog.. if it buries its head in the dirt.. they are working... walmart/autozone sell them.. the $5 cost is moot vs a deer hit
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2017
  3. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

    Joined:
    Oct 5, 2011
    Messages:
    122
    Car:
    Jetta/2000 (totalled by my son) Jetta/2006 (not letting my son drive this one) Jetta/2000 This will be my third TDI.
    Location:
    McKinney, TX
    Cool. Thanks a lot. I was thinking on using engine degreaser and a bunch of other chemicals. I will just simply drain it. In regards to the headlights, good tip. I saw them before on an online retailer, but as of now I will see if the kid takes care of the car first.

    I personally will get the smoke burn from the exhaust. :)

    Deers? We are in Dallas. We have cows. No point on wasting 5 bucks. :D

    There is another question:

    When I removed the turbo I did it without paying too much attention as of which gaskets were being used and where they were used.

    The EGR valve, sure it is only a rubber gasket.

    But the other gaskets I need to ask the following:

    Intake and Exhaust manifold, do they have an specific way to fit? they are not flat and both have an indentation to one of the sides. Does it make a difference if placed in the wrong way? Please help.

    There are 3 paper gaskets and one metal gasket, is it ok to assume that the three paper gaskets will go on the numbers 1, 2 and 3 on the picture and the metal gasket will go on position 4? Also, the metal gasket has an indentation, does it matter where the indentations face?

    Thanks for your help.

    upload_2017-4-18_21-44-10.png
     
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2017
  4. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 14, 2012
    Messages:
    1,315
    Car:
    85 kubvan
    id not use paper gaskets on the exhaust/head area.. yes they make them.. they work great on non turbo cars.. but a turbo will blow them.. they make a metal/paper one.. at min use those.. but they also make double metal and even a 1 piece all 4 in metal.. if you use the 4 singles.. 2 go one way.. 2 go the other... skinny side up.. to put in wrong will blow it too.. why the 1 piece one is nice.. prevents a oops..

    spots 1-4 in your pics should all be double metal.. no paper... i think the oil return line off turbo is the only paper gasket of any item in the pic besides the egr o-ring..

    like i stated in some other thread recently.. the groove is a crush area in the intake gasket... if either manifold or head has wear/notch.. id face the top of the ridge on the flat side so the other side will seal over the rough
     

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