Replaced Camshaft, Some Concerns...

Discussion in 'Mk5 VW Jetta, Sportwagen, and Audi A3 TDI forum' started by mattredmond, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. mattredmond

    mattredmond New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    21
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
    I replaced my camshaft (with a Colt - Frank06 was out of stock) and did a timing belt change.

    The car started on the first crank despite my having removed the tandem pump and runs well. It's got more power than it ever has. Two lifters were holed and one is badly dished.

    I'm about 20 minutes runtine plus 35 miles into this and all is good so far, but I have a couple of concerns.

    First, when I set the timing, I did so using the write-up here. Locked crank, locked cam and had hole in the cam pulley about 1/4 of the way from the left side of the toothed window on the cam sprocket. Installed belt from crank to water pump then to cam sprocket and pulled out all slack. Got it over tensioner, etc. and then installed idler. Tensioned and then turned crank over twice. After that the the crank lock installed but the cam was off. How much, not sure. So I re-did it.

    The second time, with the crank locked the camshaft locking pin went in, but it was HARD to get it in. Off by a few thousandths I figure. I didn't try to rotate the camshaft to get it in. It went in, I just had to really force it.

    On a related note, the hole in the cam hub is fairly left of center in the toothed window. I expected it would be further toward the center.

    I know I'm not off a tooth but I'm concerned there might be a little too much tension on the front side of the belt. Like I said, thousandths. Is this something I should worry about?

    On another note, I used the "Shortcut" method of removing the tensioner (pulling the stud) which was convenient, because the stud came out on its own when I tried to remove the nut. The problem with this method is that when you put it all back together there is no way to torque the tensioner to specs. There's just not any room between the engine mount and the tensioner to get a torque wrench with a socket. So I just got it gutentight. With a 6" wrench I estimated 30 pounds (2x 15 ft/lb) and gave it an extra 1/8 turn. Any worries here?

    Like I said, it runs great so I'm sure the timing is good. I'm just worried about the belt or tensioner failing given what I've described.

    Thanks!
     
  2. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2010
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    7,128
    Car:
    2010 Golf GTD (170) CBBB
    Location:
    Stoke on Trent, England
  3. mattredmond

    mattredmond New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2011
    Messages:
    21
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Dallas, Texas
  4. terpsgeorgia

    terpsgeorgia Member

    Joined:
    Nov 26, 2016
    Messages:
    42
    Car:
    06 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    Cleveland, Georgia
    Regarding the torque on the tensioner, yeah, I went with feel as well since there was no way to get a torque wrench in there. I need to do the timing belt in the not too distant future, figure it will be ok for a while.

    Regarding the timing, measure the torsion value and see where it is. If it is around 1, from other posts, this seems to be the optimal setting. Although I don't know if the colt cam has other optimizations. I personally found it very hard to tell if the hole was in the right place due to the parallax. The torsion value seems to be the source of truth.
     

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