Rear Bearing Replacement Jetta 2000

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by chacaocop, Apr 14, 2012.

  1. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    DIY Rear Bearing replacement on a 2000 MKIV (This procedure will work on any Jetta, Golf and New Beetle 1999-2005 MKIV)

    Difficulty 3/5

    Disclaimer: Before you attempt any work on your car, refer to the factory service manual and follow all precautions. Any and all information presented on this website is superseded by the official service manual and is not a substitute for the services or advice of a certified professional mechanic. See the TOS Agreement for the full legal disclaimer. If installation is not done properly, it can result in an accident or loss of control so have your local garage do it if you're not qualified to work on the bearings.

    Introduction – This Article shows how to replace the rear bearings only.

    The front bearings differ from the rear ones quite a bit. The front ones are pressed into the knuckle by themselves, while the rear ones are part of a whole hub assembly. The inner and outer rear wheel bearing, abs speed sensor rotor (do not confuse with the ABS sensor) and hub are all combined into one single assembly.
    So you are not confused, the speed sensor rotor is the mesh looking like part surrounding the rear portion of the hub.
    Brake dust will be present all over the parts you will be removing. It will be recommended to use simple green or a similar cleaning product to clean all the surfaces and parts when exposed. I like to do that every time I work on any part of my vehicles.

    Parts for DIY Jetta, Golf and Beetle Rear Bearing hub replacement:

    Large flat screw driver
    Phillips P3 screw driver
    Hammer
    5mm Allen wrench
    8mm Allen
    30mm Socket
    3 Jaw puller (you can rent this for free at AutoZone)
    Kukko 204-2 Puller. The price is around 120-240 depending on the supplier.
    A wheel bearing hub.
    Dust Cap
    Stub Axle Bolt IDParts, ECSTuning, Autozone and many others sale the hubs and all the parts needed to be changed.
    Simple green spray (brake cleaner fluid will also work)
    PB Blaster

    Procedure to replace rear bearing

    Secure front wheels, put the car in gear and ensure the brake is not on since otherwise you won’t be able to remove the caliper. Jack up the end of the car you want to work on (using the factory jack points) so that the tire is just barely touching the ground.

    [​IMG]

    Remove the center cap to get to the lug bolts, and loosen but don't remove the bolts. I do this so that the car's full weight isn't resting on the wheel. This makes it easier to loosen the lug bolts. Do not completely loosen the lug bolts until the car is secure on jack stands. If you can't get the lug bolts loose, try using a breaker bar or your leg to increase leverage. Your legs will always be stronger than your arms.
    Make sure the car is secure before removing the lug bolts or wheel and going any further and see the legal disclaimer for the full TOS.

    [​IMG]

    Remove the tire.
    Once the tire is off the car, then remove the dust cap from the rotor. The Bentley manual states that it should be replaced every time.
    I used a flat screw driver and a hammer. A few gentle taps all around should take it out.

    [​IMG]

    Even though the Bentley manual does not ask to remove the emergency cable, I found that is simpler to remove it since there will be more maneuverability of the caliper once it is off if the cable is removed. To do that, remove the clip colored in yellow sustaining the cable and take the cable out. Based on my experience, it is better to remove rear lower shock absorber bolt and to take the shock absorber out colored in white from the lower base. In that way you will have easy access to the 8mm hex bolts
    Use the 8mm allen wrench to remove the caliper out. The two bolts colored in red are the ones that need to be removed. Once they are out remove the caliper and secure it with a rope or cord to the spring. Never leave the caliper hang by the brake line.

    [​IMG]

    Once the caliper is out, use a Phillips P3 screw driver to remove the screw holding the disc in place and remove the disc from the axle.

    [​IMG]

    Now it is time to remove the hub. Use the 30mm socket to remove the center 12 point nut at the center of the hub assembly. A breaker bar will be helpful since the nut is torqued at 130 ft-lb or 175 Nm.

    [​IMG]

    Once out, use the 3 Jaw puller to pull the whole assembly out.

    [​IMG]

    Now that the assembly is out you can see that the inner bearing race will remain at the stub axle.

    [​IMG]

    In order to remove it you have 3 options:
    The first is to use a Dremel drill and cut very gently to break it off the stub. I personally do not like this method since it can potentially ruin the stub axle itself if miscalculated, but it is an option if you trust your pulse.
    The second option is to use the Kukko 204-2 puller by grabbing the inner race by the upper lip. Ensure it is tight so it doesn’t slip and then pull the race out of the stub. Spray PB Blaster and let it soak for 10 minutes before trying to pull it out. It will help it slide smoother.
    The third option is to remove the axle stub by removing the 4 screws holding it to the Axle Beam, the ABS sensor by removing the 5mm hex nut and the splash guard.
    Once it is out, you can hang the axle stub facing down and by the use of an acetylene torch, heat the bearing race to expand it until it drops by itself. For me this is the safest and easiest option. You local machine shop can also do it for you for 10 bucks.

    [​IMG]

    If you choose the third option, the surface between the axle beam and the axle stub must be free of rust; the bolts must be replaced and tied to 44 lb-ft or 60Nm.
    At this moment Simple green can be sprayed all over to clean the area. Be sure to follow the instructions as of how to use it.
    Now that the inner bearing race is out it is time to install the new axle hub.
    First install the Axle Stub, splash guard and torque it at 44lb-ft. Now install back the abs sensor using a 5mm allen wrench.
    Now insert the wheel hub bearing. If you place a little bit of grease it should slide all the way back. Ensure it is straight and you should have no problem.
    Now it is time to place the NEW axle nut back and tight it to 129 lb-ft. Once it is done you can place the caliper back and torque the 8mm allen bolts to 44 lb-ft.
    If you removed the shock, place it back in place. Remember to re-attach the parking brake cable and clip to secure it., place the NEW cover over the bolt.

    [​IMG]

    Place the tire back, tight the nuts at 89lb=ft, and cover with the center cover if you have one.

    My own disclaimer is that this procedure is for informational purpose only. If you choose to follow this procedure is at your own risk.
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  2. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Thanks for the upload!

    However: you make life much too complicated, IMHO...

    First of all, it's not necessary to disconnect the shock absorber, and as for removing the inner bearing race: I would never remove the stub axle for this... for starters, I've never had good luck trying to remove ABS sensors... they're usually destroyed in the effort... the race is made of a fairly brittle material, and if you score it with the Dremel, a cold chisel will easily crack it loose*... (I also don't bother disconnecting the emergency brake cable... it helps "hang up" the caliper...)

    As well, one can use the old 30mm nut to drive in the new hub/bearing... it doesn't usually (in my experience) want to push to the back gently... but then again, we live in the "rust belt"...

    All the best,

    Yuri

    * see comment below
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2012
  3. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    Hi Yuri:

    You may be right, but I guess my tools were the ones not helping. At the begining I tried to remove the hex 8mm bolt with an allen wrench and was a pain you know where.... Then I tried to use an impact wrench to loosen it and an allen socket and the extension was too short. The only way to properly seat the allen socket inside the bolt properly was to remove the lower shock. After that it was very easy.

    My experience with the dremel tools are, to be honest none. I have seen other tutorials and they use dremel without a problem. I don't have one and have the torch instead. If the axle is removed it only takes 5 seconds for the torch to heat up the race and it drops very easy and wihtou risking to damage or scratch the axle itself.

    The emergency brake cable.... well I needed to caliper out of the way to use the impact wrench, so I think that was the reason I did what i did.

    I have to admit, I was expecting the hub to be a pin to slide in, like for example what i had to do with the frint bearings which would only go pressed in.

    This thing did slide in and out. I was surprised too, but again, no rust for me here in Texas.

    I guess you are doing the 2+2=4, while I did the (10-8)+(7-6)+10/10=4 :D

    Both produce the same results.
  4. rmchambers

    rmchambers New Member

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    Good write up

    There are many ways to skin a cat and if everything is clean and rust free the minimalist method probably works. Where I live in CT the roads get salted in the winter and rust is the result so chances are I'd have to go a bit more aggressive on it.

    Lots of good pictures too. Dremel type tools are wonderful things, I have a little one that runs off my air compressor which can spin up to 10,000 rpm and with a composite wheel can cut just about anything. I understand your not wanting to nick up the bearing stub using one though, it's a case of being careful and working slowly. Rushing while doing automotive work is the cause of many a cut knuckle and broken part.

    Thanks for sharing it.

    Robert
  5. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

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  6. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

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    already noted, no need to post it in the other thread, the other thread is more of an announcement thread.
  7. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    Really? I did not know there is a contest for best write of the month... I was just trying to help in the same way I have been helped by the awesome procedures listed in this forum. Honestly, I just wanted the satisfaction of someone having success by following what I documented, and of course being added to the DIY section and have some bragging rights.:D

    I do appreciatte all the documented processes.

    You guys are doing a superb job.

    I will be replacing the front wheel hubs of my MKV soon. Expect that procedure as well to be posted.
  8. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Hub-ba, Hub-ba...

    Yuri
  9. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Revised my commentary

    Well... wouldn't you know it? 3 days after commenting on this, the left rear bearing on my wife's car was almost seized... with internal damage... (we arrived home late last night, and when she was going to leave this morning, the car had other ideas...)

    For the first time I was unable to crack the inner race by hitting it with a chisel... I don't know if the 2003s have a different design, but this particular race had a wide "washer-like" lip (extension) behind it... perhaps that's why it didn't want to crack... (it could also be that I'm getting old...) In any case, having dremeled a slot into the race, I was able to rotate it about the stub axle with the chisel to get it loose (put some penetrating oil in there as well), and used a 4-inch 3-jaw puller to remove it... (had to borrow the puller from a neighbor, as I'm always missing the sales at Princess Auto and Harbor Freight...)

    Never a dull moment with these cars... (this bearing lasted 461,600 miles... I wonder when the other one will go... in any case, I now have to order a new hub and nut to keep in stock...) I'm also debating whether to replace the ABS sensor since the hub's off... decisions, decisions...

    Yuri


    PS: getting the new hub assembly on the stub axle was also far from routine... needed to get some heavyweight "persuasion" to drive it far enough so that I could use the old axle nut to push it to the end...
    Last edited by a moderator: Apr 17, 2012
  10. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    Wow. I hope the pictures worked for you...
  11. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Well, I've done this 6 or 7 times before, so I've got the procedure pretty well learned... this was the first time that I wasn't able to crack the old bearing race, though... However, 2 days later I drove past a Harbor Freight, and they had a small set of pullers on sale... so I finally have a couple...

    Yuri
  12. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    Which pullers? Do you have the link of them?
  13. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Well, as you're no doubt aware, H-F only sells the highest quality tools they can find... There was a set of 3 pullers for about $18... (I'm guessing 3, 4, and 6 inch)... I'm very far from them at the moment, so I can't give you much more info than that... sorry... (I'm also struggling to type on this German keyboard that has the y and z reversed...)

    All the best,

    Yuri
  14. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    The set of 3 pullers I bought on the 19th was their catalog number 32184... normally $24.99, was on sale for $18.99...

    Today, passing by the same Harbor Freight on my way back from the airport, I saw that the 4 puller set was on sale... so I returned last week's purchase and got that one... for $24.99... catalog # 40965... (3", 4", 6" and 8" pullers... not the greatest quality, but... when you need one...)

    Yuri
  15. chacaocop

    chacaocop Member

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    Hey guys. Was this article good enough at the end to be included in the FAQ section? Has a winner been picked yet? I would not mind using a gift certificate to buy more parts :)
  16. williamgd2

    williamgd2 Member

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    Ymz good luck

    I am doing my front right bearing now and unless you have a cutting torch your not going to get the bolts that secure the bearing out.The torx bolts just shread.Your supposed to replace them but they shouldn't make them a ***** to get out.
  17. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    Thanks, but... I was able to do the job...
    This thread was about replacing the REAR bearing and hub on a MkIV... different animal...

    Good Luck!

    Yuri

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