Opinions on using anti-seize

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by Dave N, Jul 16, 2017.

  1. Dave N

    Dave N Member

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    Car:
    06 Golf TDI
    Location:
    Spokane Wa
    I am in the middle of rebuilding/rebushing, my front and rear suspensions as well as replacing bearings, etc. Taking them apart was a bit of a challenge and many of the bolt heads broke off or I ended up using a nut splitter to get lock nuts off of things to get them apart. The car isn't a rust bucket and I don't live near the ocean but we do get chemical deicer here and I have concerns about putting new hardware in dry. Most of the little stuff I'll put antiseize on with no worries but my concern is with all the new stretch bolts- especially the forward control arm bolts. The control arm rear bolts and the pinch bolts for the struts along with the rear shock lower bolts I will put in dry but anything that threads into the subframe and body are where I would like to use it because the thought of breaking off either of those inside the subframe or body scares the crap out of me. I know the antiseize would have the effect of lubing the threads and increasing torque but with a torque to yield bolt is that a problem? I've even thought about maybe using blue loctite or a thread sealant like loctite 542 just to keep the subframe and bolt threads from rusting together but even the 542 will have the same lubricating effect. Any thoughts or experience?
     
  2. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

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    Its a good idea to use lubricant/grease when assembling components under the car as corrosion from salt on the roads is destructive. Depending of the part no lubrication is needed as the recommend fitting dry.

    I use a special solution of Graphite and oil on exhaust nuts/bolts to make them easy to remove after a long life in service. The oil burns off but it leaves the Graphite behind, I have talked about this in threads.

    Loctite products are generally for preventing nuts/bolts from coming loose.
     
  3. Dave N

    Dave N Member

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    06 Golf TDI
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    Spokane Wa

    That's an idea. I imagine lock-ease would do about the same thing. The reason I thought about a medium loctite like blue or 542 is it seals everything out of the threads but still makes it possible to break things loose down the road. Plus you can put it on the bolt and let it dry before you use it so it doesn't act as a lubricant when putting things together
     
  4. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

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    There are plenty of anti-seize, easy removal products you can google it. Plus gas is an old one that I have.
     
  5. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

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    I would be very careful when using anti-seize products on any fastener that has a torque rating... depending on the product, you must lower the actual torque by a certain percentage, and unless you're certain of what you're doing, you could be setting yourself for a major failure.

    I would install dry unless the spec calls for lube... (it would also be a good idea to double-check the torque spec with a different reference or edition, as sometimes things are revised or printed in error... AHU crankshaft bolts come to mind - most books have them installed lubed except one major reference... YMMV...)

    Yuri
     
  6. crsmp5

    crsmp5 Well-Known Member

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    not supposed to use anti seize on tty bolts... supposedly "lubes" them up.. but imo a little is good.. alot is bad... the lower motor mount into subframe... broken those bolts a few times trying to get them out... if breaks off flush in subframe your screwed.. so a titch on threads.. alot on bolt shank.. the shank corrodes into the mount vs threads into subframe more often then not.. i cut the mount flange to get it off the shank else if breaks off flush gotta put different subframe in as cannot drill/retap those 2 holes cause they are pinched together thread
     
  7. Dave N

    Dave N Member

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    Car:
    06 Golf TDI
    Location:
    Spokane Wa
    Well that's my fear- snapping bolts off in the subframe. As it was all my ball joint bolts snapped, as well as one of my pinch bolts. Luckily I was able to just take the steering knuckle/strut into work and use the EDM to remove it without risking damage to the steering knuckle. I could do the same with the subframe if it happened but not anything on the body. I just ended up using some lockease and then putting spray undercoat on top of everything after it was torqued to try and keep things sealed.
     

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