Considering changing my own clutch(es)

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by RichmondVATDI, Mar 8, 2013.

  1. RichmondVATDI

    RichmondVATDI New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2013
    Messages:
    2
    Car:
    2003 Jetta TDI; 1996 Passat TDI
    I've got a 2003 Jetta wagon (265,000 miles) and a 1996 Passat (220,000 miles), both of which are beginning to show signs of needing a clutch. The Jetta is beginning to chatter a bit when starting out in first gear. The Passat clutch feels fine, but sounds like a throwout bearing going bye-bye. I do almost all of my own maintenance but am nervous about attempting this job. I'm searching forums now trying to learn as much as possible about the procedure. Is one of them easier than the other? I'd like to start with the easier one first :D
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  2. Seatman

    Seatman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2010
    Messages:
    5,215
    Car:
    2000 Mk4 Golf Estate 1.9tdi 174 bhp
    Location:
    Scotland
    Mods:
    PP764's, turbo and mapping
    Mmmm good question, I can only comment on the jetta though seeing as I just did my clutch in the golf recently. Anyway it's not a bad job, the worst part for me was just getting the box back in place and for that I'd recommend a friend or hoist lol. I have a weightlifter friend so that was handy.
    Per my experience I'd remove the left hand drive shaft for the access it allows, just unbolt it from the box, undo the hub nut then shove it out. You can also get it back in by turning the wheel full lock to the left.
    As for which clutch, if you're staying standard I'd highly recommend the sachs tdi kit with the G60 smf, that's the standard flywheel that'll be in your passat. I personally went with the sachs VR6 kit but I have my car tuned. Anyway the smf is really nice, much nicer than the dmf. I find the pedal feel nicer, more positive and also things like cruising, you can slow right down in 5th till the revs are at say 1500rpm then accelerate again and it's very smooth and quiet compared to the dmf.
    Some people replace the clutch fork as part of the job but that's up to yourself, I didn't and the old one looked perfect, also worth checking the little plastic bush the fork sits against.
    Oh yeh, use a cable tie or something to tie in the slave cylinder push rod, mine came out a bit to far when messing around and I ended up having to bleed it, no big deal but still.
    I think that's about all I can think of off hand.
  3. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    21,763
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    The wagon is definitely easier because the Passat has a support hanging off the framerail which makes clearance really tight. You have to rotate it, remove the backup switch, wiggle it back and forth, and it'll come out. Some just cut it off and weld it back, then it's easy. I prefer just to wiggle it. Just a little bit ;)
  4. Seatman

    Seatman Active Member

    Joined:
    Jul 9, 2010
    Messages:
    5,215
    Car:
    2000 Mk4 Golf Estate 1.9tdi 174 bhp
    Location:
    Scotland
    Mods:
    PP764's, turbo and mapping
    Come on now :D
  5. garcher

    garcher New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 22, 2012
    Messages:
    5
    Car:
    beetle/2000
    I've done a 96 Passat and a 00 NB. Start with the Jetta. Do not remove the axle flange. Just disconnect the exhaust and jack the engine toward the front bumper as far as you can (it will seem like a lot). If you jack it far enough forward, the transmission can drop down with only a little rotation.

    With the Passat, remove both axles and the passenger side axle flange. Jack the engine forward and be prepared to rotate the transmission as you drop it -- there is just so little room.

    Graham
  6. Mavrick

    Mavrick Member

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2012
    Messages:
    68
    Car:
    1999.5 VW Jetta TDI
    I dissagree. I recommend removing the passenger side axle flange, in order to clear the engine block - very easy, just a 6mm internal hex in the center of the flange. Beats removing any exhaust.
  7. Hanibel75

    Hanibel75 New Member

    Joined:
    Oct 2, 2011
    Messages:
    22
    Car:
    2003 Jetta Wagon GLS (Totaled 2/24/14)
    Location:
    Homewood, IL
    Just, well not just, but recently did the clutch on my 2003 MK4 wagon.

    Took both flanges to get it out.

    Had both flanges on it to put it back.

    The difference.. a transmission jack from harbor freight. It held it vertically so that I could raise it into place. And then rotate the differential down once I was past the subframe.

    And you will need to move the engine forward at LEAST an inch. Mine was closer to 1.5"

    Good luck. It was tough but fun.
  8. ljhfix

    ljhfix New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Car:
    jetta/2000/2002and 2003
    My 2000 Jetta TDI just started slipping at 220K...I am looking to replace clutch myself. I replaced an entire engine on a 97 passat but front end was completely removed so easy to access.

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