2014 Golf TDI 4Motion

Discussion in 'VW Mk6 Golf, Jetta, Beetle, Sportwagen TDI forum' started by wimpog, Jan 29, 2013.

  1. wimpog

    wimpog Member

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  2. whatnxt

    whatnxt Member

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    About as likely as the president to get elected to a thrid term.

    I'd sign-up for a 4-mo with the 170 HP diesel today if they were coming here.
  3. Cogen Man

    Cogen Man Member

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    Not likely. We'll get it in Canada first. Ya right :panic:
  4. wimpog

    wimpog Member

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    Since JSW is built on the golf platform now, I wonder whether it will be the case with MK7.
  5. DAVE PARKER

    DAVE PARKER New Member

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    4Motion has been around for many years.
    In Europe, you could get a 4Motion Golf as early as 1992 (Mk II chassis).

    Chances that a Golf 4Motion TDI will ever be available in America? Slim to none at best.

    cheers
    dave parker
  6. wimpog

    wimpog Member

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    Why? Is it not up to snuff to the US standards?
  7. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

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    Any small change other than an option like different sized wheels or performance gearing = not certified.

    The B5 Passat 4motion was basically a reskinned Audi A4 but didn't sell well. Passat W8 sold horribly for the same reason, the price was getting up there.

    The current Golf R is a rare case because they pushed it through as a halo car. VW will probably lose money on the cars or break even at best.

    Don't forget that Euro cars are much much more expensive - cars in the US/Canada are very cheap but you have limited options.

    The GTD has a better chance since all the parts except the engine are already there, they just need to certify the car for the US. Since the engine might be used in other VAG products the GTD has the best chance.
  8. wimpog

    wimpog Member

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    I guess it makes sense, since it'd have to be tested, certified, crashed, etc. But at the same time VW wants to increase its market share in the US, so it may spend resources getting it here.
  9. speedracer1407

    speedracer1407 Member

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    If VW thought adding 4motion as an option on US TDIs would increase market share and/or be profitable enough to justify the cost of certifying it, you can be sure they'd do so.

    The problem is that the take rate for AWD TDI golfs is likely to be very low. Sure, some people would buy them. Hell, I'd buy one. But the fact is that the Golf TDI exists on the bleeding edge of the market for compact hatches when it comes to price. The TDI's inherent virtues ensure that it has a reasonably strong base of potential buyers who are willing to pay to own one. But only just. Add another $2000 option that most people don't seem to value in a compact hatch (everyone else but Subaru don't bother selling AWD), and VW will likely push the TDI into a price range that the vast majority of hatch-purchasing Americans won't pay for a Golf.

    Consider this. My 2011 had an MSRP of $25,000 with no options other than the dealer-supplied all-weather mats. Add AWD, and that's a $27,000 compact hatch that doesn't even have a sunroof or an automatic transmission. Add those things, and you're over $30,000 before you even get to the premium stuff like upgraded stereo and xenon headlights that other compact hatches offer for well under $30,000. That's a car for VW die-hards and others with a very unique sense of value. And there just aren't enough of those.
  10. xeno555

    xeno555 Member

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    Many reasons that it will not arrive to our shores. I think the biggest reason is because it will compete with Audi A4 AWD.

    And really, who would buy a $34,000 ish compact car (except us few). Which pushes in to $37k A4.
  11. 2011tdiproject

    2011tdiproject Member

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    I have no idea if AWD TDI Golfs will ever show up in America, but I know you can build one yourself!

    And probably a lot more easily than doing something like adapting a CRV drivetrain to an Integra, which people have done without too much fab work.

    But I think the AWD would be somewhat pointless unless it was accompanied by a lot more power. Like 250+hp out of the diesel motor. I live where it snows quite a bit, and I still would not want the AWD, I mean, why would I want it, so I can push snow with the bumper? The TDI is a commuter car, and AWD adds weight and divetrain losses, which hurt mpg. I think one big reason AWD cars are so popular in the snow states is people don't like to have 2 sets of tires, summer and winter. But they're paying more every time they drive the car, as far as mpg. Look at the WRX, Infinity G35x/G37x, etc, lexus IS350 with AWD, all those cars' AWD systems kill their mpg.

    But they all do have enough power to be able to take advantage of the AWD in ways other than pseudo-replacing the need for winter tires! The TDI does not have enough power for that. If you get the power up to the point where you're doing rolling burnouts in 2nd or 3rd, AWD would be worth it.

    I don't know if you guys agree with any of that, but that's just what I'm thinking.
  12. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

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    Still should have 2 sets of tires even with AWD since AWD gets you moving, does nothing to help you stop, that's all snow tire.

    Parasitic losses w/haldex AWD aren't that bad, VW uses haldex which is an electronic clutched diff which is mostly FWD vs. the old quattro which was all wheel all the time like Subarus.
  13. 2011tdiproject

    2011tdiproject Member

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    Well, how much heavier is the Golf R than the tdi? My tdi is about 3000, if I remember correctly, and I think the R is about 3400? I know the manual vs DSG makes a difference in the weight too.

    But seriously, 400lbs, that's like a piano sitting in the back seat!

    The haldex, I have read a little on it and I remember thinking I did like the design. But regardless of where the torque is going, all those parts are still moving, and that's definitely a big part of where that reduction in efficiency comes from. And does the haldex use a hydraulic pump and line pressure to control the clutches? More losses right there too if it does.

    Thinking about parasitic losses, I was amazed to discover that my truck's divorced transfer case would get warm even when it was 0 degrees out. Warm enough to melt the snow and ice right off of it, even with the cold wind blowing on it. Same with the differentials. So I went to a full synthetic, expensive fluid, and that added at least 2mpg, and 2 mpg in a big lifted truck that was only getting 7 or 8 is a big deal, percentage wise. I think the mpg loss in AWD systems comes from stuff like that a lot more than where the system is sending the torque, whether its sending it to the front, or the back, or 50/50, are those parts are still moving, pushing fluid around and incurring losses.

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