2003 TDI Jetta into 2002 Gas Wagon

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by AFBrann, Dec 26, 2011.

  1. AFBrann

    AFBrann New Member

    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2011
    Messages:
    1
    Car:
    2003 VW Jetta TDI
    My 2003 Jetta GL TDI sedan met with a guard rail and shall never see the highway again. I bought the car back from the insurance company because the engine still starts and runs strong. I have since picked up a 2002 2 ltr gas Jetta GLS wagon with a clean rust free body. I am interested in swapping engines. I am now just starting the research on how to do this. So far it looks as though the mechanical portion is the easier half, I'm only now learning about ECU's and immobilizers. If any one has recommendations/experience I'd appreciate the advise.
    login to remove this ad
  2. YMZ

    YMZ Super Moderator

    Joined:
    Sep 22, 2010
    Messages:
    1,950
    Car:
    Jetta 2003, Golf 2001
    Location:
    Latitude 44.407959, longitude -76.018369.
    First: check with your state's Motor Vehicle department to see what will need to be filed or inspected in order for your wagon to be recognized as a Diesel...

    After that: you may wish to transplant everything from the TDI... engine and transmission (different gear ratios), ECU, wiring harnesses, instrument cluster, possibly even the fuel tank...

    Good luck!

    Yuri
  3. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    22,071
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    What is your experience level? Do you have the space to work and maybe an occasional helper?

    What is left over from the donor car?

    You'll need engine bay wiring harness, preferably the dashboard wiring harness, (ECU, instrument cluster, and key swap means no immobilizer problems) and fuel lines. The fuel tank pump will be too high pressure for a TDI since it's designed for a gasser but I think most people just ignore it. Personally I'd put in some check valve to limit it to no more than 5 psi and make sure that if the pump fails the engine won't get starved of fuel.

    While engine is out, I'd also do the timing belt and preferably the clutch if needed.

    Most states will allow engine swaps as long as the car passes emissions for the year of manufacture.

Share This Page