2000 Bora 1.9 TDI SE cam belt argument!

Discussion in 'VW Mk4 Jetta, Golf, New Beetle, Passat TDI forum' started by warrenc, Apr 15, 2012.

  1. warrenc

    warrenc New Member

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    Bora 2000
    Hi guys. I've joined up as I've just had an almighty argument with my brother whilst changing the cambelt on my 2000 Bora SE 1.9 yesterday! Hopefully someone here can help me win the argument and prove he's a muppet :)

    We had a crank locking tool and cam locking tool in place and had got the new belt on the sprockets ok and were at the stage where the belt needed tensioning. He wanted to loosen the three bolts that hold the camshaft on (the ones for altering the cam timing) so he could tension the belt. I told him not to as it would alter the cam timing and could cause all sorts of problems. He couldn't see this and that's when the foul language started! I let him do it just to get the job finished, but I marked the pulley first in case it did move. It moved a bit, then returned to its original position so all is well.

    So, am I right in thinking it was a bad idea, bearing in mind that we didn't have any equipment to check the cam timing? Is it better to just remove the locking tools and wind up the tensioner?

    Thanks.
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  2. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

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    Is this a pumpe duse engine? procedure should be similar to this: http://www.myturbodiesel.com/1000q/a4/vw-jetta-tdi-timing-belt-change-replacement-bew-engine.htm Sorry but you're wrong and here's why.

    Correct way is to loosen cam so that when you tension belt, tension is even across the entire belt. It will move as shown in the videos. Then you tighten it so that crank and cam are both at index TDC position. If done right, engine can be turned 2x and tools will slip in.

    Now if you don't loosen the cam, when you tension the belt, the cam will rotate (retard) since nothing is holding it in place. It doesn't matter if you count the teeth or use the pin, when you pull on that side of the belt, the cam will move. If the tools still fit after turning the engine over you got lucky.

    So as you can see, if you do it VW's way tension is set evenly and everything is at index position. If you try to do it another way, the cam will move and will not be at index position. If you have VCDS and look at cam timing sensor you can see how much a small difference makes.
  3. Seatman

    Seatman Active Member

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    Ha ha told you lol, you owe your brother a pint :D
  4. warrenc

    warrenc New Member

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    I'll have a pint and a slice of humble pie with him :) It all makes sense now. I was working on the theory that moving the pulley would alter the cam timing, but I see now that with it all locked up and the pulley moving during the tensioning, all should be spot on. Thanks guys. Next question will be on alternator pulleys...
  5. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

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    I just googled Anglesey...if Wales is filled with Katherine Jenkins-es (from Dancing with the Stars) I'm moving there! :D
  6. Seatman

    Seatman Active Member

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    PP764's, turbo and mapping
    It's mostly sheep in frocks but there is the occasional woman :D
  7. warrenc

    warrenc New Member

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    Its a great place to live, but not many Katherine Jenkins lookalikes :-(

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