06 jetta brm tons of black smoke!!! Help!!

Discussion in 'Mk5 VW Jetta, Sportwagen, and Audi A3 TDI forum' started by mwood1164, Dec 15, 2011.

  1. mwood1164

    mwood1164 New Member

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    Car:
    2006 jetta tdi
    Hi everyone first post I have a 06 jetta tdi that im working on and egr cooler had worn shaft sticking and leaking exhaust. after repairing exhuast leak engine had no power and massive back pressure from clogged cat convertor. replaced cat now engine still lacks power and pumps black smoke out exhuast like a frieght train. has code for inactive o2 sensor data stays at 1.0 never moves. any help would be a life saver
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  2. Keithuk

    Keithuk Super Moderator

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    Welcome to the forum. welcometomyturbodies

    You could be with a VAG-COM Autoscan to see what error codes come back, I'm told there are accessory shops in the US that can do this for free hoping you will buy something of them.
  3. mwood1164

    mwood1164 New Member

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    Car:
    2006 jetta tdi
    Ok here's an update. if i shut vehicle off and restart with pedal down runs great until i release pedal and try to reapply. then its massive black smoke no power at all and will stall. if i remove & plug vacuum line off VNT actuator then runs fine idles fine in bay. i found much info on this site regarding VNT turbos and many references to n57 solenoid but could find nothing on proper operation. like when should vacuum be going to VNT and when should it vent? is it normally venting and sends power to solenoid to send vac to VTN? help please
  4. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
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    21,590
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    So no other codes? Bad camshaft? Sticking intake valve?

    N75 solenoid cycles back and forth to control boost. It releases vac when boost is lower than requested. It passes vac when boost is higher than requested. See the VNT actuator FAQ article for a video.
  5. cerro

    cerro New Member

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    Jan 17, 2012
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    Car:
    2006 jetta diesel
    Check vacuum to boost control (g500)at idle from (n75), also check egr may be stuck open. Remove valve cover and check cam,etc. Any codes?
  6. Frenchy

    Frenchy New Member

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    Jan 22, 2012
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    Car:
    Jetta/2005.5
    I am having the same problem with my 05.5 Jetta BRM engine. I bought the car knowing it needed the cam shaft replacement. Did the cam swap/timing belt/water pump while I was at it. The car drove great for about 2 weeks. As the weather turned cold I began getting the same symptom as described above.

    When the car first starts there is tons of black smoke and a lot of hesitation when I step on the pedal. Once warm the hesitation gets better as does the smoke, but there is still more smoke than there should be.

    As for power it started out very flat until 2000RPMs then the turbo would kick in. Now it seems to get no boost at all.

    Since this new problem began I have double checked the timing, removed/cleaned/tested/re-installed the EGR, pressure tested the boost lines, and inspected the turbo to find that it spins freely and has no play in the shaft. I am running out of things to check and looking for suggestions.

    I am thinking bad actuator??? Any thoughts???

    Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thankyou.
  7. anklebiter

    anklebiter New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2012
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    2
    Car:
    Jetta 2006
    EGR Valve

    Same problem, happened to me could not even see behind me....EGR valve replacement did the trick.
  8. mwood1164

    mwood1164 New Member

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    Dec 15, 2011
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    Car:
    2006 jetta tdi
    tdi write-up

    i have attached a pdf file detailing my experence with this vehicle. Please excuse any grammer or spelling mistakes, after all I'm a tech not a writer. thanks

    Attached Files:

  9. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
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    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    Thanks for sharing some wisdom, here's your story which should make it easier to search (pics are still in the pdf file). I had a car that was driven around on a major boost leak for months, when I fixed it, the car was bellowing smoke for at least 10 hard runs and smoking for at least another 10. It was all the carbon and oil built up in the intake and exhaust burning off.

    PS, you skipped chapter 3!


    My 1st VW TDI Turbo Experience!
    A.K.A. Oh my god please make it stop! Lol
    A true account of a +Auto Master Tech going back to school the hard way!

    I guess to begin this I should Qualify myself. My name is Michael Wood, I’m the head tech at American Auto & Imports ( Soon to be renamed in its 15th year to Marzocchi Imports). I am a 1989 UTI grad with a 4.0 gpa and have been getting paid to do this for 25 yrs now ase certified master tech. I work on all makes and models and specialize in diagnostics and electrical. But this is my first drivability encounter with the tdi diesel. And go figure it turns out to be one I could find no duplicate of on the internet or on the phone anywhere. I love this job because I never get to stop learning. So for the 1st time I’m going to share fully what I learned to maybe help others learn from me what all I have learned from this car.

    Chapter 1: New customer arrives for some maintenance.
    It was just normal early December day in sunny AZ. I got up, got my coffee and off to work I go. The day like every other day begins with Gerard (my boss and the shop owner) handing me 5 repair orders to start out with. 3 drivability diags and 2 that were already sold and needed the repairs done. I give each of the other 2 techs a vehicle to work on and make sure all the parts are on the way. Then precede to begin diagnosing the other three. I think nothing of the black jetta pulling in. And why should I, we work on lots of jettas. Little did I know what was in store for me.

    Gerard comes out and asks if we had the tools to do the timing belt on a tdi turbo diesel. I tell I’m not sure we haven’t done one of those yet but let me check. I go grab our vw/audi timing tool set, pull the car up on Mitchell and sure enough we have every thing we need. I go to the office and tell Gerard no problem and meet the new customer. They had a quote from a vw dealer for $4000.00 to do a clutch, timing belt, egr cooler, diag of some glow plug codes and a synthetic oil change. So Gerard worked up a price for these items and we were much much lower. So they decided to entrust us with the repairs.
    The parts are a day out so we do nothing on it that day or the next. The day the parts are to arrive I pull the car into my bay with the clutch making an awful noise. Not something I feel the need to test drive before hand and even if I did I wouldn’t know anymore than it definitely needs a clutch. So I pull the trans, parts show up and I swap them out. We replaced the dual mass flywheel clutch setup with a standard type flywheel and clutch assembly. It goes back together without any problems or issues.

    Then I move to the timing belt. I pull up the procedure in Mitchell read it thoroughly, as I have never worked on a TDI for anything before. But I am a firm believer in the fact that there is never any room for error so I read thru the procedure twice. Then gathered up all the necessary tools and got to work. It all went smoothly for the most part. I did have to do a little more than the procedure stated and remove the right side mount and engine bracket in order to replace the tensioner pulley as it is on a stud and there is not clearance to get it off without removal of engine bracket. But that was not a big issue and I could care less about trying to beat or match book time when I’m working on something I haven’t worked on before. Especially when it concerns the timing belt of a very expensive interference engine. So back together I go new water pump, timing belt, tensioner and idler pulleys. Getting the tensioner just right took 3 tries as after I would rotate the engine 2 times and try to reinsert the crank lock and pin for cam gear the pin would not slide back into position with ease which I attributed to the belt straightening itself out on the pulleys and having to retension the belt once so the tensioner arm was dead on center of the indicator. But after the third time I could rotate the crank 2 times and lock the crank pin slid the camshaft pin right in. I went ahead turned it around 4 more times and the pin still slid right in. Finally satisfied finished reassembly without a hitch. Turned the key and fired right up. Job well done. Took much longer than I would’ve liked but I’d much rather be right than fast.

    So I finally got to drive the vehicle. Now this is not only the first TDI I’ve worked on but it’s also the first one I’ve ever driven. So I have no point of reference go by to know how much power and pep this should have. Not to mention it’s got 174,000 miles on it. I take off down the road it is much more sluggish than the 1.8 turbo A4 I worked on last week. But as far as I know it’s what it should be, a little sluggish of the line but much better at higher rpms. The customer had requested being its almost Christmas that if something could wait then they would opt to wait to repair that till after the new year. So I call the customer and invite them down to drive it and see if its acceptable if it was then we would hold off on the egr cooler and glow plug issue for now.

    Chapter 2: The first day of school (a.k.a. the nightmare begins)
    So the customer arrives and pays for the repairs we did and leaves. Just another day at the shop. A few minutes later the car comes right back and the customer states that its not fixed that it drives like it did previously and was under the impression that the problem of the sluggish hesitation on take off was clutch slippage. So I drove the car with the customer riding with me. I pull out on to Guadalupe road and off we go no slippage and not even that sluggish. She says it didn’t do it that time. So I turn down the first side street and come to a stop and take off again only this time it hesitates and is sluggish. She exclaims see it did it the clutch is slipping. I explain that that was not the clutch slipping and that it was a engine hesitation that could be caused from a number of things one of which could be due to mileage and wear and tear. She assured me that that was not the case that this wasn’t a gradual problem, that it began quickly right before the clutch started making noise and that is why she assumed it was the clutch. I explain it was not the clutch. And that her old clutch was actually physically broken and missing some of the pressure plate fingers. So after a few more stop and go’s I realize that the hesitation coincided exactly with a strange noise from the engine compartment. Easy enough I figure find the cause of the noise and find the cause of the hesitation.

    We get back to the shop and I pull the car over our pit and have someone sit inside and rev the engine a few times until I can find the noise. Which was fairly easy to discover once I removed the cloth heat shield that snaps around the egr cooler vacuum actuator. The sound was exhaust leaking out of the cooler where the shaft that was operated by the vacuum actuator went through. The hole for the shaft was probably 3 or 4 times the size of the shaft
    and the strange noise would go away when the vacuum actuator could finally un stick the lever on the shaft and pull it over. Again I think ok easy enough replace the egr cooler as already recommended by the dealer and problem should be cured. I really had no idea of why that would cause her issue for certain but I could easily come up with a couple of different possible theory’s. 1 that the exhaust leak was not allowing the turbo to function as it should, 2 that the egr cooler was not allowing proper flow of exhaust gases and throwing the fuel delivery off. All I was certain of was that the noise and hesitation coincided exactly and that it needed to be replaced no matter what. So again we have to wait for parts. When they show up I replace the cooler and gaskets pretty easy job not much you can screw up with it. Let the car down start it and all is well right? Wrong this turned out to be only the real beginning of this saga. Now the real issues start to rear there ugly head and my schooling truly begins.

    Chapter 4: Is that a dragon or an old freight train
    I kick the rack out, hop in and put in gear. It seems to be idling fine. I go to back out and as I give it some pedal I feel it bog down. Now instead of being a little sluggish it flat will hardly move its got no power at all. I get out pop the hood have someone press the pedal and it almost dies! I walk around the back and sure enough there’s hardly any exhaust coming out the tail pipe. I raise it up loosen the exhaust up at the center joint and separate it still hardly any flow at all. I move forward to the front pipe and start loosening the clamp at the turbo and it starts whistling out before I even get the clamp loose. I thought wow how could a cat that plugged run as good as it did even with some exhaust leaks? I still don’t know the answer to that question but it is what it is. I was sure of 1 thing for certain and that’s that it needed a cat for sure. So I price out a catalytic converter from the local vw dealer, its over $1000.00. I called the customer to give them the bad news, and the poor woman starts crying on the phone. After all it is Christmas time and they’ve already spent quite a bit on the repairs and maintenance. I’ve dealt with upset customers before, but this is the first time I’ve had one start balling on the phone! I felt really bad for them. I’d rather deal with a angry customer any day that a nice one that’s in tears. I told her that I would see if I could find an alternative source for the cat the next day. And that I could probably find an aftermarket one for much less money.

    The next day I started the search and struck out with all our normal suppliers. I ended up finding a place that sold rebuilds for half the money. Smith Brothers Catalytic Converters in Chicago smithcat.com. Unfortunately they did not have one in stock but could outsource it and have it shipped out in a few days. Which would mean at least a week before it got to us in Arizona. Which being that it would save them about $400 dollars they preferred to wait. It ended up taking a week and a half before it got to us. When it shows up I have Mario, one of the other techs install it. When he’s done I go over to fire it up and expect to be able to take it for a test drive and say goodbye to this adventure once and for all. I turn the key it fires right up. It sounds good, idles fine, so I kick the rack out from under it. I cant help but smile as I climb in and get ready to pull out of the shop. I press in the clutch and put it in reverse give it some throttle, and instead of smoothly backing out of the bay it falls on it’s face, starts pumping out black smoke like a freight train, Dragon or like it was
    equipped with a James Bond smoke screen that’s malfunctioning badly! I couldn’t believe it. “Well” I said “at least the exhaust is definitely not plugged up anymore!”. My first thought was that something had to get screwed up in the install of the cat. I put it back on the lift and start looking for anything that might have been disconnected or damaged. My search revealed nothing. It is a straight forward out and in job. Pretty easy to do and pretty hard to screw up. So now is when the real research begins.

    Chapter 5: The Search for Why.
    Anytime I’ve ever been asked why I do this job the answer is the same, and given without the slightest hesitation, “Because it’s one of the few things you can do for a living that you get to work with your hands and you never stop learning new things”. I absolutely love that no matter what I am always going to keep having to acquire new knowledge in order to do my job properly. The worst thing that I’ve seen in so many Tech’s thru the years is the “Master Tech know it all syndrome” A quick note to any up and coming Tech’s and to all the so called master tech’s out there, There is no place in this field for your ego! There is no possible way to know it all . I’ll take young 5 yr tech that understands that he’s still learning and isn’t afraid to ask for advice or instruction on a job over a 20yr “Master Tech” that thinks he know it all and is full of ego and foolish pride any day of the week. We as Tech’s have a responsibility to be humble and understand that we must always keep learning and researching and at times experimenting at the cost of ourselves and not the customer in order to do the job right. The best asset a Tech can have in my opinion is the ability to know when they need to set down the wrenches and start looking for more information. And know how to interpret that information into understanding. Understanding takes more effort than getting on identifix to see what’s the most common issue and selling it. That’s nothing more than a guided guess. And yeah maybe 90% percent of the time you get lucky and it does fix it. But if your having 10% come back to bite you you need a new career. Understand how and why. Take enough pride in your work to want it right. The customer is trusting us with not just their car but their livelihood, the safety of their spouse’s and children. They are entrusting us with an important and necessary part of their daily lives. Do not take that for granted or ever forget that we are in one of the most important service industries in the world and that we are counted on to do our job properly at all times.
    Ok sorry about going off on a tangent like that, back to the smoke belching dragon. So here is my dilemma. I have this car now for more than a couple of weeks. The customer drove the car to our shop spent a lot of money already and their car is in no way even drivable at this point. They are driving Gerard’s mother-in-law’s car around now. Not to mention they are first time customers, very nice and very understanding people. That have been incredibly patient with us. And I have no clue what’s wrong with this car or really even what all could be wrong with it. I’ve never worked on one of these before and know very little about the function of most the systems at work on a TDI, One thing I do know is that I have to fix it. First thing double check our work. I pull the timing covers back off and check that, it’s good. Check the cooler work and the cat work everything looks good. I hit the computer first stop The iatn database for similar problems. Found many that had similar symptoms. Read those and the fixes when they had them and every reply given. That led me to references of tdi forums and other web sites where I started gaining some understanding of how things worked on this motor and what all the different parts function and purpose was. It did start setting a p0305 trouble code for the o2 sensor. And I did find where replacing the o2 had taken care of that code in a few cases. But it was special order and rarely sold by the dealer and I believed the code was more of a symptom than the problem. The thing I really lacked the most was knowing what the data I was viewing on the vcds scan tool was supposed to look like. So I started experimenting. I found that when I removed vacuum to the VNT actuator that the car was drivable didn’t smoke anymore and drove about the way it did when I first drove it. So I pulled off the vacuum solenoid that I assumed was just your normal vacuum solenoid and tested it the way I would any other one. I applied power blew through it and blew through it with no power and got leakage either way. Great I thought here it is, problem found. I go tell Gerard what I found and he orders 1. What I didn’t know and found no reference to anywhere was that this is not a regular vacuum solenoid. It is a duty cycle solenoid. So when I replaced it it’s not a big surprise that it didn’t help abit. I found next that when the black smoke was pumping that the mass air flow readings were way low. And that coupled with all I’d read about the problems similar to mine being caused by bad maf sensors. I go to Gerard again and this time I’m certain that this is the problem. Gerard orders the part and once again no difference.

    Now at this point even though Gerard has full confidence in my abilities he’s beginning to lose patience and starts calling the dealer to see what their top diesel tech thinks. Comes back and has me check the timing belt again. Its still checks ok. I read about what the torsion value was and that it should be optimally for this engine around .5 and it was at -2.5. So back off I go with the timing cover and adjust the cam gear. It took a few trys of moving the gear putting it back together, running it, and reading the torsion value to get it at .5. Very touchy it turned out to be. What would seem like a little movement turned out to change the torsion value by a lot. Still no difference. I pulled the egr cleaned it out. Check the egr cooler vacuum solenoid it checked good. So all this testing and searching for info was eating up not just hours at this but days. Finally Gerard makes me take it to the dealer for diagnosis. Which I hated doing but I understood that at this point the had no choice. I drop it off talk to the tech that is supposed to be the tdi guy. I tell he everything Ive tried and tested. The next day they say they got it figured out. They tell us it’s the egr switching valve and hit us for $123. Now we thought they meant the egr valve and ordered it. Put it on the next day no change. Gerard calls the dealer and they tell us to bring the car back. As soon as I leave Gerard calls tells me go back and get it. They tell me that they weren’t talking about the egr valve but rather the egr cooler vacuum solenoid I’ve already tested this part and say as much. But at this point my credibility with the tdi is very much suspect. Which I understand. Grerad knows I’ve never tackled this beast before and I havent been right yet. So I bring back the car he orders the part that is a day out. Back at the shop I swap the soenoid with one I have in my box that I know is good even though its from a totally different car it’s still just a on and off switch that also vents when off. Run a couple of jumper wires and just like I knew already knew no change. I tell Gerard he tells me we still have to change it. Which I do the next day.
  10. chittychittybangbang

    chittychittybangbang Administrator

    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Messages:
    21,590
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDI
    Location:
    CT
    part 2 of your story



    Chapter 6: “YOU CAN’T FIX IT”
    Now at this point Gerard is out of patience and his and my frustration is extremely high
    with this whole ordeal that is now approaching a month, countless hours wasted with no end in site. I knew that the tech over a the dealer did not do any type of proper diag on this car. If he had he never would have sold us a vacuum solenoid that worked fine. It doesn’t take much to power it up and blow through it. But I know that he could just throw stuff at it and if that wasn’t it return it and throw something else at it. Sooner or later he’d change the right part . That’s not diag, so when I’m told to take the car back to the dealer I start protesting. It gets heated and Gerard yells at me “YOU CAN’T FIX IT!!!!” I yell right back “I CAN FIX IT!!!!!”. He storms back up to the front while I pace back and forth calming myself and regrouping. I know I’m out of time to figure this thing out.

    I have gone thru this car with a fine tooth comb over and over. All I could do really at this point is relax and think. I started looking under the hood yet again. Touching nothing and testing nothing. Just going thru everything in my head as my gaze ever so slowly moves across the engine. As I move my eyes I’m mentally recalling every test of every part and the results of those tests. Somewhere between everything I’ve done and every scrap of info that I had spent hours apon hours tracking down and analzing I’ve missed something somewhere. To me it had to have something to do with ethier the egr system or the changes in exhaust flow. I knew timing and compression were dead on. And even though it had obvious fueling issues as it poured out black smoke I was certain this was more an effect and not the cause. I called Mario over to help me and showed him exactly how to duplicate the problem from the drivers seat. Then went back under the hood and began looking for the elusive cause of my on going challenge. And that’s when I caught it in action. I was watching the VNT acutator when I noticed it start to move on throttle then it dropped and bounced a little. And the black smoke started pouring out again. Finally after all this time and effort something went my way. I tested that actuator many times with a hand vacuuum pump for smooth operation many times and did so again now. The results were still the same, it moved smoothly without any binding whatsoever. So I set it up to be able to run it and operate it manually and bingo no smoke! Now I had tested the control for this many times as well and even replaced the solenoid and that all test fine. Only one thing left to do pull the turbo and clean it out and check something that was being effected by turbo pressure. There had to be sometype of mechanical failure.

    So off I go back up front to tell Gerard my findings. He was skeptical at best and I couldn’t really blame him for that. After all I hadn’t been right yet but niether had the dealer, which was enough to convnce him to allow me the time to take this apart and inspect it. I also knew there was no way I was going to be able to call this customer and sell them a turbo if that is what it turned out to be. So I turned to the task at hand determined to fix this issue somehow without spending anymore money. Time to say a little prayer and hope and get busy pulling the turbo out. As soon as I got it out I discovered the problem. The stop screw for the VNT lever was gone completely. There is noway to see this with the turbo in the car. The piece of the turbo casting that retained the stop screw was broken off completely. As you an see in the image below. Which was allowing the lever to go beyond its range of
    travel. What I really don’t understand is that they put a sensor on the VNT actuator so why is there no code that corresponds with the lever moving beyond its normal range? I am sure that that was addressed with the newer electric VNT motors.
    Back to the task at hand. I had the turbo out so I went ahead and torn it down and cleaned all the carbon out. I really wanted to see first hand the internals anyways. Even though I had found many very informative forums, articles and even some great videos and knew the how’s and why’s of this turbo system. I think it’s always best, when given the opportunity, to see hands on how something functions and what it’s cabilties are and are not. And besides I had to try and determine where this lever needed to stop before I could determine how to make it stop. With it apart it was very easy to see exactly where the vanes needed to travel and stop. It’s really an incredible thing to see how something can have such an effect on so many different things when were only talking maybe 10mm, 12mm at the very most of movement of one little lever. But it did, it effected almost every other critical sensor that’s used for the operation of this engine.

    Chapter 7: THE FIX!
    AKA: Why I love what I do
    I clean the guts of this turbo spotless and dang near polished on the inside. Reassemble the
    turbo, except for the actuator for now, and start figuring out what to do about this broked housing and missing lever stop. I decide that the best way to go is to make a stop out of some ¼” steel and mount it on top of the oil return where it bolts to the turbo. As you can see in the picture below the fix was really simple and easy. Now I thought about the fact that I could have just adjusted rod for the acutator and let the actuator itself be it’s own stop. But that raises way to many questions with unknown answers until putting it back together. So to me the best solution is to trust the engineners leave the rod where it was and just make a new stop.
    Now it’s Christmas eve after today we are closed till after the first of the year, Thank God! I’m totally confident that I’ve fixed the problem. So I reinstall the turbo, which goes nice and smooth. Fire it up hit the pedal and wah la it revs up! Woo hoo party time! Hit the pedal again and once again to my dismay it falls on it’s face and pumps out black smoke! Oh man what a total horrifying nightmare! I know Instantly where I went wrong. When figuring where the lever needed to stop I failed to factor in the effects on exhaust and turbo pressure would have on the lever. But it was the end of the day and I was out of time. Gerard of course was not happy and very doubtful that I had a clue what was causing the problem.

    There was no possible way I could enjoy my vacation with this unresolved. So Christmas day after the morning celebration and opening of presents I took my daughter and went to work. I had no need to remove anything from the engine this time to change the stop. A long extension and socket from the underside and I had it off in no time. Added 5mm to the length of the stop and tossed it back in. Fired it up and finally it was fixed! And that’s when I got to see just how much pep these motors have. Off with the traction control and on with the e brake and smoked the tires thru three gears with no problem. I sent a text to my boss that it was finally fixed and verified that it was fixed. Ha told him I could fix it! May have took awhile. But I learned so much about so many things that I feel it was worth the whole experience. Moral of the story: Just because you don’t know doesn’t mean that you can’t fix it. There’s no way for anybody to know it all in this field. The good techs are the ones that know this and know how to gather and comprhend information and apply it. And sometimes it means you lose your ass on a job but if you walk away with more knowledge and the satisfaction of fixing a tough one it’s worth it. The love of learning is why I do what I do and even after all these years I still have to go back to school regularly. The only difference is the beauty of the internet allow me to be the teacher as well as the student.

    Writen by: Michael E. Wood
    Head Tech Marzocchi Imports formally American
  11. maloon

    maloon New Member

    Joined:
    Mar 27, 2012
    Messages:
    2
    Car:
    06 jetta
    great post! love your attiude.;)
  12. orange spitfire

    orange spitfire New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 1, 2012
    Messages:
    3
    Car:
    2006 Jetta TDi
    Clean your EGR valve! If the Cat was plugged, chances are the EGR valve is too. I can sell you mine....:D I did away with the EGR and cooler altogether. In Florida, we have no inspections so you may be able to benefit from this. Let me know!
  13. fichfarm

    fichfarm New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10
    Car:
    2006 jetta tdi
    my 2006 jetta tdi with manual trans does about the same, but no black smoke, just sounds like an air compressor then suddenly it stops and the car takes off. Like some flapper someplace being shut not letting air thru. then all of a sudden the it must open and starts working right. What could cause this?

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